Kathleen R. Keeler

Assistant Professor

Management & Human Resources

Background

Kathleen Keeler is an Assistant Professor of Management and Human Resources at the Max M. Fisher College of Business at the Ohio State University. She received a PhD in Organizational Behavior/Human Resources Management from Virginia Commonwealth University and a MA in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from George Mason University.

Dr. Keeler's research focuses on understanding the benefits and drawbacks of listening to music in the workplace. Specifically, she is interested in the reasons why people listen to certain types of music, how objective characteristics of music influence employee behavior and emotions, and the conditions under which music is most or least effective for various types of performance. Her theoretical account of how different characteristics of music (e.g., musical key, tempo, etc.) may differentially impact various types of job performance outcomes via self-regulatory processes was recently published in the Academy of Management Review. Her research interest in music in the workplace also ties with her research interests in organizational health climate and the work/non-work interface.

She also does research on various issues relating to research methods and statistics. Her work in this area has been published in Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of ManagementOrganizational Research Methods, and Psychological Methods. In 2017, she and coauthors won the Sage Best Paper award for their paper "Degrees of freedom in SEM: Are we testing the models that we claim to test?" published in ORM

Areas of Expertise

Human Resources Management
  • Compensation
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Performance Management

Education

PhD in Organizational Behavior/Human Resources Management - Virginia Commonwealth University

MA in Industrial/Organizational Psychology - George Mason University

BS in Psychology - George Mason University

Publications

Cortina, J. C., Koehler, T., Keeler, K. R. & Pugh, S. D. (In Press) Situation strength as a basis for interactions in psychological models. Forthcoming in Psychological Methods.

Cortina, J. M., *Sheng, Z., *Keener, S. K., *Keeler, K. R., *Grubb, L. K., Schmitt, N.,Tonidandel, S., Summerville, K. M., Heggestad, E. D., & Banks, G. C. (In Press). From alpha to omega and beyond! A look at the past, present, and (possible) future of psychometric soundness in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Journal of Applied Psychologyhttps://doi.org/10.1037/apl0000815

Keeler, K. R., & Cortina, J. M. (2020). Working to the Beat: A Self-Regulatory Framework Linking Music Characteristics to Job Performance. Academy of Management Review, 45(2), 447-471. https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.2016.0115

Keeler, K. R., Kong, W., Dalal, R. S., & Cortina, J. M. (2019). Situational Strength Interactions: Are Variance Patterns Consistent With The Theory? Journal of Applied Psychology, 104(12), 1487–1513. https://doi.org/10.1037/apl0000416

Cortina, J. M., Koehler, T., Keeler, K. R., & Nielsen, B. B. (2019). Restricted Variance Interaction Effects: What They Are and Why They Are Your Friends. Journal of Management, 45(7), 2779–2806. https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206318770735

*Cortina, J. M., *Green, J. P., *Keeler, K. R., & Vandenberg, R. J. (2017). Degrees of Freedom In SEM: Are We Testing the Models That We Claim to Test? Organizational Research Methods, 20(3), 350–378. https://doi.org/10.1177/1094428116676345

Courses

  • BUSMHR 4326 - Compensation and Benefits Administration

    Provides a comprehensive framework and state-of-the art tools for designing compensation systems via assessment of organizational needs, internal and external equity, and compensation administration. Prereq: 2291 or 2292 (BusAdm 499.01); and 3200 (701), and AcctMIS 2200 (211), 2300 (212), and BusMgt 2320 (330), 2321 (331). Not open to students with credit for 762.

  • BUSMHR 7313 - Total Rewards/Compensation

    Introduction to pay systems; including job evaluation, pay surveys, performance appraisals, and benefits. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 865.