Upcoming supply chain event keynote wins major industry award

Don’t just take it from us that our featured keynote for next month’s Center for Operational Excellence supply chain event is a big deal.

chris caplice
Chris Caplice

The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals at its annual conference in Orlando this week awarded Dr. Chris Caplice the Distinguished Service Award, the most prestigious honor around for supply chain professionals. Caplice, the executive director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Transportation and Logistics, is the keynote at COE’s Oct. 21 supply chain forum. Registration is open now, though seating is restricted to employees of COE member companies.

Speaking of Caplice, CSCMP CEO Rick Blasgen said that Caplice “from his involvement in education, to his innovative work in identifying and developing technologies that have contributed to the improved efficiency and effectiveness of transportation, logistics, and supply chain processes … has had a dramatic impact in shaping the supply chain discipline as we know it.”

Caplice has contributed to our growing knowledge on supply chain management from the industry and academic side, placing himself in what CSCMP calls an elite group. In addition to his MIT role, he has worked at Logistics.com, Sabre Holdings, the Virginia Military Institute and the U.S. Army, where he served as an officer.

At COE’s event next month, Caplice is addressing a serious challenge for many organizations today, which lack supply chain designs that can suitably adapt to disruptions. He’ll be highlighting four oncoming trends – miniaturization, virtualization, decentralization and digitization – that will alter the competitive landscape as companies devise new ways to serve their customers. This session will provide supply chain managers and others with new insights as they rethink assumptions in their partner selection, distribution network design, and chosen service platforms.

Read more about the event here or register now.

Member news roundup: Huntington-FirstMerit deal, Cardinal Health leadership

Center for Operational Excellence member companies have made headlines in the past week. Here are the highlights:

Cardinal Health steps up commitment to women in leadership roles (Columbus Business First)

Cardinal Health Inc. is making a concerted effort to promote women because that will bring it closer to its customers in health care, said Paul Gotti, vice president of nuclear pharmacy at the Dublin health care giant.

Crown Equipment honored for commitment to hiring veterans (Lima News)

Crown Equipment was honored Wednesday by the Ohio Department of Veterans Services for its dedication to hiring and retaining military veterans. Chip Tansill, director of the the Ohio Department of Veterans Services, traveled to Crown’s headquarters in New Bremen to thank the veterans for their service, and to acknowledge the company’s consistent recruitment of Ohio’s military servicemen and women.

Huntington sets sights on converting FirstMerit branches (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Columbus-based Huntington announced its $3.4 billion purchase of FirstMerit in January. The deal closed two weeks ago and FirstMerit will be converted to the Huntington brand in full early next year. Until then, Huntington is asking FirstMerit customers to continue using existing FirstMerit branches.

Wexner Medical Center revenue tops $3B (Columbus Business First)

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center had $3.21 billion revenue in its first full year with the James Cancer Hospital tower and doubled emergency department, a 9 percent increase over the prior year and passing the $3 billion milestone for the first time.

DHL Supply Chain adding to payroll in central Ohio with tax-cut help (Columbus Business First)

An unidentified beauty products company will receive a six-year, 1.485 percent tax credit in a pass-through by third-party logistics partner DHL Supply Chain. The company, formerly known as Exel, will add $13.31 million in annual payroll as a result of the project.

Scotts buying 90 acres in Marysville (Columbus Business First)

A Marysville hospital system is scrapping plans for an expansion in the city, opting instead to turn 90 acres of undeveloped land back over to Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. for product testing. Memorial Health will sell the land bordering Route 33 to Scotts (NYSE:SMG) for $4 million, both organizations said.

Goodyear’s SVP of global ops on way out (Crain’s Cleveland)

The tiremaker this week disclosed that Gregory L. Smith, senior vice president of global operations, will leave the company Dec. 15. Joe Zekoski, the company’s chief technical officer, took over his duties earlier in August.

Greif tops earnings estimates in latest quarter (Yahoo! Finance)

The Delaware, Ohio-based industrial packaging maker said it had profit of 78 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, came to 91 cents per share. The results exceeded Wall Street expectations of 72 cents a share.

Fisher collaboration brings op-ex tools to realm of education

An unconventional effort to reform Ohio’s K-12 education system is sending a new pack of leaders out with more than an MBA from Fisher College of Business and a certification to serve as a principal.

They can wield some foundational operational excellence tools, as well.

bright student fisher mba
BRIGHT fellow Shaun Mitchell, right, shares the results of his A3 problem-solving project.

Fisher this summer graduated 30 students as part of the BRIGHT New Leaders for Ohio Schools program after they spent nearly a year working as administrators in high-poverty schools around the state and completed an accelerated MBA program at Fisher. The program, launched in 2015 with $3.5 million in state funding and help from Fisher and the Ohio Business Roundtable, takes business professionals from a variety of backgrounds – largely non-education – and deploys them throughout the state as principals. BRIGHT fellows, as they’re called, must serve as a school administrator for at least three years after graduation.

At a presentation prior to graduation, a number of BRIGHT fellows showed the results of their work tackling the A3 problem-solving methodology, one of a few tools Center for Operational Excellence Executive Director and BRIGHT educator Peg Pennington introduced to the curriculum.

“The BRIGHT program itself is an experiment, so I thought to myself, ‘Why not do an experiment of our own here?’” Pennington said. “These problem-solving skills – A3s, root-cause analysis – are powerful tools anywhere, and I think they can really help cut to the heart of some of issues that plague our education system.”

For the BRIGHT fellows, those issues included lagging math and reading scores, a lack of collaboration between upper- and lower-grade students and educators, truancy, and discipline referrals, among others. Pennington in her classes with the BRIGHT fellows showed how the A3 and root-cause analysis can properly define the problem and, medically speaking, move past managing symptoms to truly treat the underlying ailment.

David Maile, a longtime plant farm owner who transitioned out of the business two years ago, signed onto the BRIGHT program and found himself as an administrator at Highview 6th Grade Center in the Cincinnati suburb of Middletown, where the poverty rate has jumped from 9 percent to nearly 14 percent in about 15 years. Maile leveraged root-cause analysis and A3 problem-solving to improve math scores in the school, where he said much of the challenge was in bringing a level of consistency and precision to data collection.

Other process-improvement projects were of a more qualitative nature. Jeff Greenley, a lawyer by training, worked in the Switzerland of Ohio School District in Appalachian Ohio, the highest-poverty region in the Buckeye State. Greenley’s school housed a wide age range of students that rarely interacted, in large part because they didn’t see the value in it. Greenley did.

After defining the problem via an A3 and enacting countermeasures, Greenley finished the school year with more than four in five upper-grade students helping out and interacting with elementary-age students. The A3 process, he said, was eye-opening.

“There are not a lot of tools at our disposal in education to think about operational problems,” he said. “This is a hammer we can use to hit the nail.”

Regardless of the challenge, the BRIGHT fellows discovered very quickly that data was a crucial asset in their problem-solving journey – even if it wasn’t used as such in their schools. Astrid Arca, an economist for the state of Ohio, served in the same Appalachian school district as Greenley and took on the challenge of improving reading and math schools in a student population with a high percentage on so-called individual education plans. The data needed to cut to the heart of the problem, Arca found, existed – but weren’t being analyzed to inform instructional practices.

“There was almost a fear of the data,” she said, “and most of my job was removing those barriers.”

BRIGHT leaders are hoping that spirit has a transformative effect in the schools where its graduates are heading this fall and beyond, even if the difference in background for many fellows hasn’t gone unnoticed. Deborah Copeland, a BRIGHT principal coach with a nearly 30-year background as an elementary school principal, acknowledged a level of skepticism around “outside” people taking a leadership role in education. Often, she said, it just takes spending time alongside the fellows to see that they have the skills and capability to drive change.

“It’s been a joy watching these fellows coming in with a different perspective, full of hope and promise and not weighted down by the barriers that those of us who’ve been in the trenches often get blinded by,” Copeland said.

The BRIGHT fellows themselves are the source of a telling data point: About 90 percent had K-12 principal or assistant principal jobs locked in at the start of the school year.

Nationwide, Owens Corning make ranks of best places to work in I.T.

A pair of Center for Operational Excellence members have landed on ComputerWorld’s annual ranking of the best companies to work in information technology.

nwide oc logosThe magazine’s 23rd annual ranking placed Toledo-based COE member Owens Corning fourth on its large-company list, up from No. 7 in 2015. Columbus-based Nationwide landed at No. 36 on the list, up from 49th in 2015.

ComputerWorld’s rankings surveyed nearly 25,000 I.T. staffers at the nominated companies to rank the list, culling details on office culture, benefits, and training/career development opportunities.

The magazine singled out Owens Corning’s “dynamic environment that offers employees opportunities to grow professionally.” Nationwide received plaudits for its learning and innovation events, “hackathons” and peer-led educational sessions.  The company also is active in COE’s IT Leadership Network, a group of IT leaders committed to implementing process improvement principles in that space.

Coming in at No. 1 on the large-company list this year was Detroit-based Quicken Loans, whose president spoke for COE members in 2012.

Explore the list here or download a PDF of the detailed ranking here.

What COE members made the Fortune 500?

Nearly half of COE’s member companies or their parent organizations made the ranks of the 1,000 largest companies in the U.S., with 10 cracking the Fortune 500.

cardinalThe magazine’s much-hyped annual list was released earlier this month, with Dublin, Ohio-based Cardinal Health cracking the Fortune 25 at No. 21, with $102 billion in annual revenue. Cardinal Health is the highest-ranked COE member company on the list and the second-highest Ohio-based company, behind No. 17-ranked Kroger ($109 billion).

Other COE members and member company owners in the Fortune 500:

  • 58. FedEx Services parent FedEx ($47.5 billion)
  • 69. Nationwide ($40.2 billion)
  • 128. Emerson Climate Technologies parent Emerson Electric ($22.3 billion)
  • 137. Progressive Insurance ($20.9 billion)
  • 138. Abbott Laboratories ($20.7 billion)
  • 165. American Electric Power Company ($16.9 billion)
  • 169. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. ($16.4 billion)
  • 224. Parker-Hannifin ($12.7 billion)
  • 480. Owens Corning ($5.4 billion)

Member companies that fell outside the 500 but made the ranks of the Fortune 1,000 are

  • 540. KeyCorp ($4.3 billion)
  • 580. Hexion ($4.14 billion)
  • 628. Greif ($3.62 billion)
  • 698. Huntington Bancshares Inc. ($3.15 billion)
  • 724. Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. ($3.02 billion)
  • 864. Mettler Toledo ($2.4 billion)

Click here to view and sort the full list.

J&J exec, Buckeye football greats fill out summer innovation series

Whether it’s at a $70 billion-a-year consumer products conglomerate or a fledgling business in the heart of the Buckeye State, innovation is the fuel that keeps organizations moving and evolving.

The Center for Operational Excellence is continuing its three-part “Innovation Summer” series in July and August with a look at two very different organizations of vastly different scope and how best practices in product development are helping them grow.

meri stevensOn Wednesday, July 13, COE welcomes Meri Stevens (pictured, left), the vice president of supply chain strategy and deployment at Johnson & Johnson for Innovation Summer, Part 2: Innovation Beyond Your Four Walls. Building on a June 16 keynote from Mark Anderson of 3M Co. on R&D collaboration inside the company, Stevens will share how the maker of Tylenol, Listerine, and countless other products is collaborating upstream and downstream to fuel radical, breakthrough innovation.

For Johnson & Johnson, even the very concepts of “upstream” and “downstream” are changing in an era of unprecedented consumer involvement as products such as 3-D printers extend value creation beyond the company’s borders. Stevens will share how this shift has brought about major cultural change for J&J’s thousands of supply chain employees as they work to “move the needle” for the Fortune 50 business.

Stevens’ presentation will be followed by a trio of TED Talk-like presentations from Fisher College of Business researchers, led by “Innovation Summer” organizer Prof. Aravind Chandrasekaran, on the latest insights into collaborative innovation.

Click here to register for this 8:30 a.m. to noon event at Ohio State’s Fawcett Center, exclusively for employees of COE member companies. This session is recommended for those interested in either innovation or supply chain management.

carpenter schlegel“Innovation Summer” concludes Thursday, Aug. 18, by exploring principles of the “lean startup” with a presentation from Buckeye football greats Bobby Carpenter (pictured, far left) and Anthony Schlegel (pictured, immediate left). Both Carpenter and Schlegel, Fisher College of Business MBA graduates who played for the Buckeyes and went on to be drafted in the NFL, founded The Difference USA LLC, which makes and markets a portable striking machine. Schlegel, who invented The Difference, will share along with Carpenter his journey to bring the product to life and the lasting lessons the team has learned about the process of innovation.

Registration for this event is set to open Wednesday, July 13.

For details on these events and save-the-dates for additional COE opportunities, check out our events page.

Fisher students in 1st wave of new professional certification

A group of undergraduate operations students at the Fisher College Business bear the distinction of being the first in the world to earn a new professional certification seen as a stepping stone another key resume-booster.

A total of 15 Fisher students recently passed a version of a new exam through the American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS) to earn the “Global Supply Chain Associate” (GSCA) designation. This brand-new designation is the culmination of a year’s work among faculty at several universities nationwide, including Andrea Prud’homme, a clinical faculty member at Fisher who also serves as an associate director for the Center for Operational Excellence. The Fisher students took part in a test launch of the program, which is set to roll out internationally this fall .

Prud’homme said a key motivation in creating the GSCA designation was the fact that undergraduates often don’t have the time or money to pursue the well-known Certified Production and Inventory Management (CPIM) designation.

“This gets them started should they wish to pursue CPIM certification,” Prud’homme said. “Additionally, many of the companies that hire our undergraduates provide incentives and support for new hires to become CPIM-certified.”

COE summit highlighted on ‘Manufacturing Tomorrow’ podcast

manufacturing tomorrow
Have five minutes to spare?

The Ohio Manufacturing Institute just released the latest edition of its semi-monthly Manufacturing Tomorrow podcast, which they recorded at the Center for Operational Excellence’s Leading Through Excellence summit just last month.

Podcast Executive Producer Kathryn Kelley in this edition interviews a trio of COE members – Agrana Fruit’s John Labrador, Crown Equipment’s Craig Wreede and WillowWood’s John Matera – on what operational excellence means for them. Listen here, and check out the podcast’s website here.

COE regularly partners with OMI to bring speakers to Manufacturing Tomorrow. Past COE collaborations have resulted in podcasts interviewing Goodyear’s Norbert Majerus, COE Executive Director Peg Pennington, Snap-On Inc. CEO Nick Pinchuk and more. They’re all on the podcast archive.

Special thanks to Kathryn Kelley and the OMI team for visiting the summit and featuring our members.

 

Lean IT, innovation, women’s leadership sessions on COE summer slate

Following a record-breaking Leading Through Excellence summit in April, the Center for Operational Excellence is gearing up for a busy slate of summer events.

Spotlight on MassMutual at IT Leadership Network forum

Dalton Li
Dalton Li

After a visit from Menlo Innovations CEO and Joy Inc. author Rich Sheridan May 13, COE’s popular IT Leadership Network forum series returns June 3 with a presentation from Dalton Li, a vice president who leads the continuous improvement practice for $29 billion-a-year MassMutual Financial Group.

In this session, which kicks off with a networking breakfast, Li will provide an inside look at MassMutual’s approach to lean deployment, its coaching strategy, and its support system for sustaining gains. Li began his career as a nuclear submarine officer based in Annapolis and later served as an assistant professor for the U.S. Navy before working at consultancy McKinsey & Co. for six years. He joined MassMutual in his current role in 2012.

Formal invites for this session are set to go out early the week of May 2.

Innovation Summer series

B. Carpenter, A. Schlegel
B. Carpenter, A. Schlegel

Just a few weeks later, COE kicks off a three-part “Innovation Summer” series led by Associate Director Aravind Chandrasekaran. This series, set for June 16, July 14 and Aug. 18, tackles questions including: How can companies leverage lean/Six Sigma practices to build more agility for innovation teams inside their organization? How can they carry those across the supply chain? And how can these best practices cultivate an idea from its earliest stages?

Across this trio of sessions, you’ll hear from innovation icon 3M, Buckeye/NFL greats and business owners Bobby Carpenter and Anthony Schlegel (pictured, left), and more.

Registration for the first of the three sessions will open the week of May 9.

‘Build Your Brand’ workshop

Krista Neher

COE’s semi-annual Women’s Leadership Forum series returns June 24 for a workshop with Krista Neher, CEO of Boot Camp Digital. This “Launch Yourself” session will help attendees define, design and deliver a powerful personal brand online.

Registration for this limited-capacity session will open the week of May 16.

Check out COE’s events page for save-the-dates on additional events into the fall and through 2017.

‘Joy Inc.’ author, former summit keynote Sheridan returning in May

Miss last year’s Leading Through Excellence summit? Looking to revisit one of our most popular keynotes?

Rich Sheridan during his keynote at Leading Through Excellence 2015
Rich Sheridan during his keynote at Leading Through Excellence 2015

The Center for Operational Excellence is partnering with Fisher College of Business’ Master of Business Operational Excellence program to bring to campus Rich Sheridan, CEO of award-winning software developer Menlo Innovations LLC and author of Joy Inc. Employees of COE member companies are invited to join MBOE program alumni the morning of Friday, May 13, for a keynote by Sheridan, who kicked off the 2015 Leading Through Excellence summit and led a half-day workshop.

A programmer by trade, Sheridan entered the corporate world and found at the midpoint of his career that he no longer experienced the joy that had drawn him to the industry. After losing his job as a software development executive when the dot-com bubble burst, he founded Menlo Innovations in 2001, saying the company’s purpose was to “bring joy to the world through software.” Menlo has gone on to win the Alfred P. Sloan award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility for eight straight years and has earned five revenue awards from Inc. magazine.

In his keynote, based on Joy Inc., Sheridan will offer an inside look at the culture that’s flourished at Menlo over the last 15 years that leverages visual management, an open and collaborative workspace, and a “fail fast” ethos that has garnered attention nationwide. All attendees will receive a complimentary copy of Sheridan’s book, Joy Inc.

Click here to register for this limited-capacity event.