Member Huntington Bank commits to major bump in hiring, lending

Center for Operational Excellence member Huntington Bank on Nov. 22 announced plans to add 1,000 jobs in its home city of Columbus in the next several years and boost its commitment to lending in low-income area neighborhoods.

Huntington BankHuntington said it plans to achieve its jobs push by 2024, adding 1,000 workers to its Columbus-area payroll of about 5,600, according to data from Columbus Business First. Huntington today ranks as the 15th-largest employer in the Columbus area, just ahead of COE member Cardinal Health Inc. The bank also said it will commit to lending $300 million to low- and moderate-income areas of the city over the next five years, with a focus in the Linden and Northland neighborhoods.

“Columbus is our home, for the past 150 years, and we’re stepping up to help transform an important area because we believe in helping small businesses grow and families prosper,” Huntington CEO Stephen Steinour said in a statement. “The city has been an outstanding partner and we’re proud to support the Mayor’s vision to revitalize key growth neighborhoods.”

For more details on Huntington’s announcement, including its plans to consolidate jobs in a brand-new office, check out reports in Columbus Business First and the Columbus Dispatch.

Keynote, tour details emerge as registration for COE summit approaches

Ready to make your Leading Through Excellence game plan?

Registration for the Center for Operational Excellence’s fifth-annual summit is set to open Friday, Dec. 2, when COE will be hosting its final event of 2016. Leading Through Excellence will take place April 11-13, 2017, at the Fawcett Center in Columbus, Ohio, and is expected to attract nearly 400 process excellence leaders from around the country. Once again, the summit will bring a blend of dynamic keynotes and breakout sessions from researchers and business leaders, hands-on workshops, and off-site tours, all focused on developing key problem-solving and leadership skills.

More information on the summit, including a new keynote addition, will be announced at the Dec. 2 seminar, but here are some speakers, events and other key details you should know:

Chris Yeh
Chris Yeh

Co-author of bestseller ‘The Alliance’ set for closing keynote: COE is thrilled to announce Chris Yeh, bestseller of The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age, will be serving as the closing keynote of the summit on Thursday, April 13. Yeh’s book, which he wrote with LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha, debuted in 2014.

A collaborator with high-tech startups since 1995, Yeh’s mission statement as described in The Startup of You is “To help interesting people do interesting things.” He has been blogging since 2001, both on his personal blogs and as a guest author in outlets like TechCrunch, Mashable, and VentureBeat. He’s also the author of the popular blogs Adventures in Capitalism and Ask The Harvard MBA.

More keynote information will be announced Dec. 2 and posted on our summit website.

cleveland-clinic
Image source: CNBC

Tour highlights Cleveland Clinic’s lean office excellence: Cleveland Clinic isn’t just one of the best hospitals in the country. It’s also a model of how a culture of excellence and continuous improvement can grow and sustain across a massive organization that sees more than 5 million patient visits a year and employs more than 3,000 caregivers. Leading Through Excellence attendees will have the chance on Tuesday, April 11, to head to Cleveland and get a look at how the organization has rolled out operational excellence in its back-office functions. This all-day opportunity is a must-see for process excellence practitioners in service and transactional environments. It’s one of more than a dozen tours and workshops being hosted on the first day of the summit, most of which are posted on the summit website.

Bose, FedEx, IBM leaders among breakout session hosts: Head to our summit website now for an early look at confirmed hosts of the breakout sessions that fill out April 12-13 at the summit. The sessions once again feature the summit’s signature mix of insights from Fisher College of Business researchers and transformation stories from business leaders. This year, participating organizations include Bose Corp., Fedex Corp., IBM, ThedaCare, and more.

Best group discounts end Dec. 31: The first four weeks of summit registration offer member and non-member attendees the chance to save up to 15% on summit registration by registering five or more employees at one time. A smaller early bird discount runs Jan. 1 – Feb. 13, though groups of five or more save an additional 5% during the entire registration period. Check out our pricing info for more details.

Don’t miss your best chance to save the most on what will mark the biggest event in COE’s 25-year history!

Event preview: Keys to collaboration in any industry

As a researcher, Prof. Aravind Chandrasekaran doesn’t hang his hat in one particular industry.

In the 12 years he’s been contributing to our knowledge on issues such as innovation, knowledge creation and health-care delivery, he’s walked the floor in manufacturing plants, chased high-tech electronics as they move through the R&D pipeline, and scrutinized discharge instructions for kidney transplant recipients.

At the heart of his research is the question of handoffs: How can we move information more efficiently? How can we bring products to market more rapidly? How can we discharge patients and ensure they won’t be readmitted days later?

Prof. Chandrasekaran is bringing key insights from his research across this variety of industries to the Center for Operational Excellence’s Dec. 2 seminar, where managers can learn how they can collaborate across departments – even across their supply chains – and avoid common roadblocks such as employee burnout, intellectual property leaks, and scope creep. His 10:30 a.m. presentation is followed by a 1 p.m. keynote from Pete Buca, a top executive at manufacturer Parker Hannifin who’s giving an inside look at the company’s remarkable collaboration with Cleveland Clinic.

COE spoke to Prof. Chandrasekaran about his research and what attendees can expect at his Dec. 2 keynote.

COE: This summer, you led a three-part “Innovation Summer” series for COE. How does your upcoming keynote build on that?

AC: We focused this summer specifically on product and process innovation by looking at companies such as 3M and Johnson & Johnson. This keynote is meant for the R&D folks that attended this summer but a much broader audience, as well. I’ll be sharing keys to the “perfect handoff” by looking at examples in manufacturing, health care and IT services, not just R&D. There’s not a single COE member that wouldn’t benefit from it.

COE: Let’s talk about health care, specifically what non-health care companies can learn from your extensive research in that field.

AC: A lot of discussion in recent years has centered on what health care can learn from other industries, particularly manufacturing. I think the reverse is true, too: In health care, you have specialists – physicians, nurses – who are extremely skilled at what they do. At the same time, you have a complex ecosystem with tons of variation across patients, even caregivers. Those two components are present in just about any industry. As a result, many of the tools and processes I’ve worked with caregivers to apply in health care can be easily transferred to other settings.

COE: Speaking of handoffs, what are some of the biggest mistakes companies make when collaborating across departments or the supply chain?

AC: I think a really common one is that departments or companies take for granted that the other party has a clear understanding of the process. This is at the root of so many problems I’ve seen in R&D and health care. There’s also a misconception that the rules and requirements established at the beginning of a process don’t change. They can, sometimes in a way that can take us by surprise. I’ll be sharing insights in my keynote that can help managers address both of these common missteps.

COE: What’s causing more of these surprises?

AC: The increasingly global nature of business plays a not insignificant role here.  More than ever, companies are dealing with language and cultural barriers, regulations and political risks – and the stakes for success have never been higher.

To register for Prof. Chandrasekaran’s keynote and the entire Dec. 2 seminar, click here.

Parker Hannifin, Cleveland Clinic partnership focus of Dec. 2 keynote

Being a top hospital in the country, Cleveland Clinic is home to countless great ideas poised to transform into life-altering, even life-saving, medical advancements.

Getting those ideas out of the heads of its top-ranked physicians and onto the market has been the focus of a remarkable collaboration between the hospital and one of its neighbors in the Cleveland economic scene: Manufacturer Parker Hannifin Corp.

pete buca
Pete Buca

This partnership, which began quietly nearly a decade ago and was formally announced in 2014, is the focus of the afternoon keynote at the Center for Operational Excellence’s Dec. 2 seminar. At the event, Parker Hannifin VP Pete Buca will share details on the Cleveland Clinic collaboration, which has become a bustling pipeline of medical device ideas the company is working to bring to life using its own product development process, dubbed “Winovation.”

Recently ranked the No. 2 hospital in the country, Cleveland Clinic sees more than 5 million patient visits a year and employs more than 3,000 caregivers. That same U.S. News & World Report ranking called it the No. 1 hospital in the country for cardiology and heart surgery and one of the top five for diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, orthopedics and pulmonology, among others.

Parker Hannifin, meanwhile, is an $11 billion-a-year maker of motion and control technologies that spent about $360 million on research and development in its latest fiscal year. It’s a supplier to more than 400,000 customers that span just about every significant manufacturing, transportation and processing industry in the economy: Food and beverage, life sciences, renewable energy, agriculture and aerospace, just to name a few.

Parker and Cleveland Clinic began collaborating several years ago in an effort to connect the engineering and product development prowess of the former with the critical insights into health-care challenges at the latter. To translate these two capabilities into action, Parker employees sat in on surgeries and communicated with surgeons, leaders told Crain’s Cleveland Business. Interactions like these spawned the 100-plus ideas that initially populated the partnership’s pipeline.

One product seeking to eventually make its way to the market is what’s called the Cleveland Multiport Catheter (CMC), a bold attempt to advance the treatment of brain cancers. Gliomas – a type of tumor in the glue-like supportive tissue of the brain – are resistant to radiation and other common therapies, largely because of the natural barrier in the body that keeps circulating blood out of the brain.

Surgical catheters that pump cancer drugs directly into the brain have been used on a trial basis for the past few decades, according to an October 2015 article by a CMC inventor, but have key limitations. Two in particular, according to the article, must be used in a special operating room, and left in only for several hours. The CMC, which began development in 2009, can be implanted in any neurological OR then be left in place for several days, ultimately delivering more cancer drugs, wrote inventor Dr. Michael Vogelbaum.

Cleveland Clinic partnered with Parker Hannifin to manufacture the CMC and treated its first patient with the device about two years ago. A March update revealed seven patients have undergone treatment with the CMC, which now has an Investigational New Drug application formally on file with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Vogelbaum said in a CMC update video that the device ultimately could help treat other neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease and epilepsy.

At COE’s Dec. 2 seminar, Buca will share other exciting developments with Cleveland Clinic and detail how other organizations can learn from their collaborative innovation efforts. The featured keynote at the seminar’s morning session is Fisher College of Business Prof. Aravind Chandrasekaran, an award-winning researcher who will be sharing keys to collaboration.

Head to COE’s website to read more about this members-only session, or register now.

New Fisher program seeks to fill pipeline of women supply chain leaders

While only about two in every five undergraduate supply chain-focused students at universities are women, they hold a scant 3 percent of executive-level leadership roles at Fortune 500 companies. The Management Sciences department at Fisher College of Business this fall has launched a new initiative seeking to grow those numbers at both ends of the pipeline.

pathways scholars
This year’s Pathway Scholars with representatives from Motorists, Wendy’s QSCC and Management Sciences.

The department this academic year welcomed its first round of scholars in the Pathways for Women’s Excellence in Supply Chain program, a group of eight first-year undergraduate women at Fisher College of Business. Each student has received a $2,500 scholarship, funded by this year’s Pathways Scholars sponsors: Columbus-based Motorists Insurance Group and Wendy’s Quality Supply Chain Cooperative.

Management Sciences Department Chair Ken Boyer said he worked to launch the program for reasons both personal and practical. He’s the son of one of the first women to earn a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin 60 years ago.

“Barriers to women in a variety of professions have been greatly reduced in the intervening decades,” Boyer said. “Unfortunately, this is far different from saying there are no challenges.”

Indeed, data from research firm Gartner shows women staff only 20 percent of supply chain leadership roles at the director level and higher. This comes as the nation’s supply chain workforce faces a troubling shortage as waves of baby boomer retirements crest.

Krista Pohlman, senior director of program management for Wendy’s QSSC, said developing the company’s talent pipeline was a key motivator in signing on to fund the Pathways Scholars program.

“We really want to be a world-class supply chain organization,” Pohlman said. “To collaborate with Ohio State in an effort to bring more women into this industry is something we’re immensely proud of.”

Ralph Smithers, assistant VP of Associate and Community Engagement at Motorists, said the company approached the opportunity with similar goals.

“We’d like to increase the number of women in the supply chain management field, and it’s a great opportunity to work with Fisher on this,” he said.

The scholars in the program, in addition to their funding, connect with mentors from Motorists and QSSC over the course of the year and receive coaching from Fisher professors. They also connect with supply chain organizations through several exclusive events hosted throughout the year. Already this fall, the students have toured Wendy’s and Wendy’s GSCC, attended a National Association of Women Business Owners conference, and met with supply chain leaders from JPMorgan Chase & Co., Nestle USA and DSW Inc.

Ultimately, Boyer said, the participating students will be well-positioned to find supply chain leadership roles as they enter the workforce.

For information on the Pathways program and sponsorship, check out its website or contact Ken Boyer at boyer.9@osu.edu.

L Brands CEO Wexner shares leadership lessons from storied career

les wexner
Les Wexner’s September keynote attracted a record audience for a COE event.

Even as an icon in leadership circles who’s built a thriving, multibillion-dollar retail business, L Brands Founder, Chairman and CEO Les Wexner stays true to his roots – and is quick to acknowledge them.

“But for The Ohio State University, I wouldn’t have been able to go to college and get the basic education that helped me so significantly in my career,” he said, opening his featured keynote at the Center for Operational Excellence’s September seminar. “Every time I come back on campus, I smile to myself.”

Wexner came back on campus to headline a leadership seminar that attracted nearly 300 attendees, making it the largest in COE’s nearly 25-year history. Here’s a look back at some of his best insights over a wide-ranging discussion that covered his personal philosophy on leadership – what he called “a lifetime executive education program you have to master for yourself” – along with his outlook on the retail business and his verdict on crucial past decisions he’s made:

On the value of leadership education: “I firmly believe leadership is not just an important thing – it’s the most important thing, and it’s undervalued in high schools, colleges and universities. If there’s a single thread of teaching and learning that I try to influence at our university, and influence other educators to think about, it’s the importance of leadership as a subject.”

On what makes a great leader: “Leaders come in all shapes and sizes with virtually every characteristic and kind of personality, but they all have the ability to influence, and influence is the foundation of leadership – whether it’s by pushing from behind, coalescing the middle or being an insurgent, General Patton-type. I always default to the front; I like to churn things up and say, ‘We can take that hill, let’s charge.’”

On the virtue of adaptability: “Leaders that continue to grow are optimistic but they’re professionally curious about society and they think about adapting, trying new things, and understanding things they can’t so they can be continually relevant in their own lives. … In my thinking, the only way to test my adaptability is to do something different. It’s very important mid-career not only to have a good understand of yourself, but to think about how to exercise that curiosity muscle between your ears and be adaptive.”

On why brick-and-mortar retail is here to stay: “We’re pack animals. People like to be with people; that’s part of the human condition. It’s what they buy that changes, and one of the things that’s interesting to us is how the Internet has changed lifestyles, communication, and the consumer. … Still, we find that shopping has to be fun and interesting, and we’ve been experimenting with that for several years.”

les wexnerOn his game-changing decisions to spin off brands such as Abercrombie + Fitch, The Limited and Express: “I believe in life cycles. I look at those cycles and say, ‘OK, when’s the next wave coming, and is that a good or a bad thing for us? Those were very tough decisions I thought over for a long time. I gathered in my own mind the information and had to suck up some courage to do it. It turned out to be the right thing to do and it did take our business to a better place.”

On the inevitable challenge, and opportunity, of risk: “Leaders have to have a pretty good instrument on risk. We remember generals that won wars, not the ones that got killed doing foolish things. There’s that notion of knowing yourself, and leadership is about change, taking people to places that haven’t imagined. That means risk. … Leaders have a vision that’s a little different than the one that’s popular at the moment, and in that you have to assess failure. If I didn’t screw up some things, that means I didn’t push hard enough.”

On why aiming high matters: “I try to encourage our enterprise to really dream. If you don’t have a dream, you can’t have a dream come true. Still, you have to focus on ambition, in part, and separately think about the resources you need, and the risks. … The world’s changing while we’re here and it’s just going to get faster in the future. Are we stimulated by that? I am.”

On how he stays busy – and grounded: “What I worry about is running out of work – it would just be a terminal thing. I like the idea of work, and I have a substantive to-do list that’s more than I can finish. … I made a decision in my early 40s that I could make more money but I couldn’t make more time. Nobody can make more time. If I was effective and efficient, I could do more with the limited time I have.”

On why he enjoys leading: “People ask me when I’m going to retire, and I say, ‘When I’m unhappy.’ I like the people I work with, the challenges, the changes. Leaders have to be happy with themselves. If they’re not, they can’t lead themselves, let alone others.”

On the ultimate test of a leader: “The simplest measure of leadership is this: Did you actually take people to a better place? Are we better off today than we were yesterday, whether that’s in business, family or community? It’s not about how many people followed you blindly. Did you actually improve things in hindsight?”

Employees of COE member companies can revisit Wexner’s full keynote, along with the morning “Authentic Leadership” keynote by Fisher Prof. Tony Rucci, by logging into the members-only area on our website.

(Author’s Note: Quotes have been lightly edited and condensed)

Below the equator, a classic process problem

The next time you think your organization’s process problems are so singular they couldn’t be happening anywhere else, ask Joe Langlitz and his colleagues how they spent the first month of their summer this year.

botswana students
From left: Bi, Langlitz, Goetter

Langlitz and fellow Fisher College of Business MBA students James Goetter and Wenzhao Bi closed out their first year in the program with an 8,000-mile trip below the equator to Gaborone, Botswana. They were one of eight groups of students sent overseas through Fisher’s Global Applied Projects (GAP) program to work up-close with a corporation to solve a business challenge. Sponsoring the students’ gap team was the Botswana arm of British banking giant Barclays, where Fisher alumnus Jeff Davis serves as Chief Risk Officer.

Looking back at the work Langlitz and his team completed, Davis says they’ve helped lay the groundwork for some major improvements in Barclays’ business loan approval process. Getting there, however, entailed a frenzied three-week mission to hunt down process waste that put to work what each team member brought from the classroom and enlisted the help of a few Center for Operational Excellence members, too.

‘I wanted a revolution’

Davis cut his teeth in the birthplace of lean manufacturing, working with automakers and suppliers as they applied lean/Six Sigma principles. Today he’s a top officer at Barclays Botswana, which employs 1,200 at its corporate office and 42 branches and ranks as the second-largest bank in the market.

“When I got into financial services later in life, I would see our processes through the lens of the learnings I had in the automotive industry and would get frustrated at our inability to do true lessons and root-cause analysis in our pursuit of simple, repeatable processes.”

A particular target of Davis’ frustration was the corporate loan approval process at Barclays Botswana, which could – and often did – take as few as two days but also could stretch past six months in some instances, putting average turnaround just shy of four months.

“I wanted a revolution,” Davis said. “I wanted 500 percent better.”

Project Firefly

Davis took his first steps toward a solution by connecting with the GAP program at his alma mater, eventually bringing the trio from Fisher to Gaborone and pairing them with two MBA students from the University of Botswana. The project team had zero formal corporate banking experience – and that’s exactly what Davis wanted.

“We wanted an injection of new ideas,” he said.

(From left) Langlitz, Bi and Goetter taking a break from the office at Botswana's Mokolidi Nature Reserve
(From left) Langlitz, Bi and Goetter taking a break from the office at Botswana’s Mokolidi Nature Reserve

Langlitz admits to a dose of culture shock upon arrival. Gaborone is the governmental and economic capital of a country with a fast-growing economy, but one that also still relies heavily upon mining and the cattle trade. It’s the latter – particularly their penchant for wandering onto busy roads in Gaborone – that struck the team in their early days.

“The first week we were there, it really sunk in: ‘We’re on the opposite side of the equator,’” he said.

The more time the team spent in country, however, the more familiar it became – and the more Langlitz and others saw how universal challenges such as those at Barclays are.

“They’re just like any institution,” he said. “They’re trying to figure out better ways to serve the customer.”

The GAP team and their University of Botswana colleagues took on what Barclays dubbed “Project Firefly,” an extensive effort to visualize the loan approval process flow in the form of a value stream map and, importantly, flag non-value-added elements therein. The long-term goal is to slash average loan-processing time a staggering 90 percent to only 10 days.

Mapping the process required interviewing numerous stakeholders across different offices and navigating at-times fraught situations.

“With the overall process so fragmented, teams tend to be myopic when dissecting which processes are adding to uncompetitive turnaround times,” Davis said. “We asked the team to hold a mirror up and tell our people what’s going on without placing blame, and they did a nice job of lowering defenses.”

Enlisting help

In addition to receiving regular coaching from COE Executive Director Peg Pennington, the Project Firefly team also sought insights on the challenge at hand from two member companies: Huntington National Bank and KeyCorp.

“A lot of the pain points they had,” Langlitz said, “were pain points Barclays has been dealing with.”

Jeremy Winstel, a senior manager of enterprise lean/Six Sigma for Key, said reducing customer hassle has been a regular focus for the bank in its process improvement efforts. His insights served as a key early benchmarking opportunity for the project team before and during their stint in Gaborone.

“Providing this knowledge transfer assistance has been a great way to get plugged in to Fisher and try to help out,” Winstel said. “That’s what the COE’s about, holistically.”

Kevin Plaugher, senior vice president and business banking credit manager at Huntington, also spent time walking the team through the credit approval process and imparting a key bit of wisdom:

“It’s like physics,” Plaugher said. “If you want to extend credit to the customer, there are certain things you have to do, and you can’t pretend steps in the process can be skipped or eliminated. Still, even with the most manual processes, there are tools to make it faster, simpler, and clearer.”

Langlitz said benchmarking with Huntington and Key “sent us down the right path” to ultimately making this key discovery: More than half of the time Barclays Botswana spent processing loans was non-value-added. This opened the door to substantial improvements.

Just the beginning

The Project Firefly team capped their nearly three-week stint with Barclays Botswana by reporting out their findings and recommendations to the bank’s executive leadership team and its Managing Director, the region’s top-ranking official. Langlitz said the team took particular pride in the fact that none of its recommendations came strictly from qualitative information.

“All our recommendations were data-driven,” Langlitz said. “These weren’t just because we heard someone say it was a good idea.”

The results and recommendations provided major clarity for Barclays going forward, even if Davis and his colleagues already knew process waste was a problem.

“We knew there was a lot of waste in the system, but we’d never been able to measure it,” he said. “They did a great job of taking a complicated set of data from a lot of locations and distilling it down to a very clear story to tell.”

Through the summer, Barclays Botswana began hiring additional associates and making its first strides in implementing some of the Project Firefly recommendations. Improvement efforts are set to ramp up through the fall, Davis said, for what is expected to be an ongoing process.

As for the students, Langlitz said he and his colleagues gained invaluable process improvement skills, through an unforgettable experience, no less.

“Being able to say I’ve been there, done business in a different culture, I’m a lot more comfortable now.”

For more behind-the-scenes details on Project Firefly, check out the blog the students maintained for the trip. For more details on the GAP Program, click here or play the video below:

Member news roundup: OSU fundraising tops $3B; Progressive makes hiring push

Center for Operational Excellence member companies have made headlines in the past week. Here are the highlights:

BMW Financial looking to innovate in auto-finance sector (Automotive Management Online)

Columbus-based BMW Financial has selected five startups to join an Innovation Lab, dubbed the automotive sector’s first financial technology business incubator. “The five finalists,” according to AM Online, present a range of innovations that could revolutionize how consumers own and insure cars in the future, from opening up entirely new types of leases to consumers, through to tackling the barriers young drivers face.”

FedEx Services Co-CEO to lead solo next year (Bloomberg)

FedEx Corp. this week unveiled a number of changes in its C-suite, led by news that FedEx Express chief Dave Bronczek will become president and COO of the parent company. This makes him primed to succeed CEO Fred Smith. FedEx also announced the retirement of Mike Glenn, whose roles included co-CEO of FedEx Services. The other Co-CEO, Rob Carter, will become FedEx Services CEO in 2017.

KeyCorp clears major hurdle to purchasing First Niagara (Albany Business Review)

Cleveland-based KeyCorp this week received clearance from the Office for the Comptroller of the Currency to buy Buffalo-based First Niagara Financial Group. It’s the last step in a nearly yearlong process to merge the banks’ assets.

Nationwide in deal to buy Jefferson National (Louisville Business First)

Columbus-based Nationwide is buying Jefferson National of Louisville, taking on the company’s portfolio of investment and fee-based advisers. Nationwide said the deal marks a major expansion of its sales reach in the financial services market. The transaction, which will make Jefferson National a Nationwide subsidiary, is set to close early next year.

Ohio State fundraising push tops $3B (Columbus Dispatch)

The “But For Ohio State” fundraising campaign launched under former Ohio State University President Gordon Gee is coming to a close with a haul past the $3 billion mark. OSU President Michael Drake on Thursday told major donors that the university brought in $3,004,563,961. For scale, that’s about half of the university’s annual top line.

Progressive Insurance mounts big hiring push (Insurance Networking News)

Cleveland-based Progressive Insurance said it plans to hire about 1,300 people by the end of the year, mostly information technology positions. Jobs will be added at its headquarters and other offices around the country. That’s an increase of about 5 percent over Progressive’s headcount as of June 2016.

Wexner Medical Center chief outlines path forward in Q&A (Columbus CEO)

Dr. Sheldon Retchin, CEO of OSU’s Wexner Medical Center, said in a recent interview that he’s seeking to “make Ohio State a place where innovation and research are really top of the chart.” Growth areas, he said, include research in addictive medicine and health policy.

Upcoming supply chain event keynote wins major industry award

Don’t just take it from us that our featured keynote for next month’s Center for Operational Excellence supply chain event is a big deal.

chris caplice
Chris Caplice

The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals at its annual conference in Orlando this week awarded Dr. Chris Caplice the Distinguished Service Award, the most prestigious honor around for supply chain professionals. Caplice, the executive director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Transportation and Logistics, is the keynote at COE’s Oct. 21 supply chain forum. Registration is open now, though seating is restricted to employees of COE member companies.

Speaking of Caplice, CSCMP CEO Rick Blasgen said that Caplice “from his involvement in education, to his innovative work in identifying and developing technologies that have contributed to the improved efficiency and effectiveness of transportation, logistics, and supply chain processes … has had a dramatic impact in shaping the supply chain discipline as we know it.”

Caplice has contributed to our growing knowledge on supply chain management from the industry and academic side, placing himself in what CSCMP calls an elite group. In addition to his MIT role, he has worked at Logistics.com, Sabre Holdings, the Virginia Military Institute and the U.S. Army, where he served as an officer.

At COE’s event next month, Caplice is addressing a serious challenge for many organizations today, which lack supply chain designs that can suitably adapt to disruptions. He’ll be highlighting four oncoming trends – miniaturization, virtualization, decentralization and digitization – that will alter the competitive landscape as companies devise new ways to serve their customers. This session will provide supply chain managers and others with new insights as they rethink assumptions in their partner selection, distribution network design, and chosen service platforms.

Read more about the event here or register now.

Member news roundup: Huntington-FirstMerit deal, Cardinal Health leadership

Center for Operational Excellence member companies have made headlines in the past week. Here are the highlights:

Cardinal Health steps up commitment to women in leadership roles (Columbus Business First)

Cardinal Health Inc. is making a concerted effort to promote women because that will bring it closer to its customers in health care, said Paul Gotti, vice president of nuclear pharmacy at the Dublin health care giant.

Crown Equipment honored for commitment to hiring veterans (Lima News)

Crown Equipment was honored Wednesday by the Ohio Department of Veterans Services for its dedication to hiring and retaining military veterans. Chip Tansill, director of the the Ohio Department of Veterans Services, traveled to Crown’s headquarters in New Bremen to thank the veterans for their service, and to acknowledge the company’s consistent recruitment of Ohio’s military servicemen and women.

Huntington sets sights on converting FirstMerit branches (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Columbus-based Huntington announced its $3.4 billion purchase of FirstMerit in January. The deal closed two weeks ago and FirstMerit will be converted to the Huntington brand in full early next year. Until then, Huntington is asking FirstMerit customers to continue using existing FirstMerit branches.

Wexner Medical Center revenue tops $3B (Columbus Business First)

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center had $3.21 billion revenue in its first full year with the James Cancer Hospital tower and doubled emergency department, a 9 percent increase over the prior year and passing the $3 billion milestone for the first time.

DHL Supply Chain adding to payroll in central Ohio with tax-cut help (Columbus Business First)

An unidentified beauty products company will receive a six-year, 1.485 percent tax credit in a pass-through by third-party logistics partner DHL Supply Chain. The company, formerly known as Exel, will add $13.31 million in annual payroll as a result of the project.

Scotts buying 90 acres in Marysville (Columbus Business First)

A Marysville hospital system is scrapping plans for an expansion in the city, opting instead to turn 90 acres of undeveloped land back over to Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. for product testing. Memorial Health will sell the land bordering Route 33 to Scotts (NYSE:SMG) for $4 million, both organizations said.

Goodyear’s SVP of global ops on way out (Crain’s Cleveland)

The tiremaker this week disclosed that Gregory L. Smith, senior vice president of global operations, will leave the company Dec. 15. Joe Zekoski, the company’s chief technical officer, took over his duties earlier in August.

Greif tops earnings estimates in latest quarter (Yahoo! Finance)

The Delaware, Ohio-based industrial packaging maker said it had profit of 78 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, came to 91 cents per share. The results exceeded Wall Street expectations of 72 cents a share.