Posts Tagged 'Ohio State'

The Start-up Nation and Spring Break

Israel has recently received the nickname “The Start-up Nation” thanks to Dan Senor and Saul Singer, authors of a book with that phrase as its title.

israel 3As part of an international innovation and entrepreneurship course here at Fisher, I had the chance to travel to Israel over the break to learn more about its unique business environment. The trip was an incredible experience full of learning and networking opportunities.

As a group, we spent the first few days in Tel Aviv. I was surprised at how modern and diverse the city was. People from all walks of life lived in Tel Aviv and worked in various industries. As part of our visit, we met with many businesses in the high-tech industry. Some of my favorite business visits in Tel Aviv were to Venture Capital firms or the small business in which so many VC’s invest.

In addition to visiting traditional businesses in Tel Aviv, we had the opportunity to visit an Israeli Air Force base. It was enlightening to learn about the strategy and tactics that the Air Force uses in defending its land and country. On a daily basis, Israel faces threats from various enemies and needs to be ready to perform efficiently at any given moment. I was most impressed by the rigorous amounts of training that take place on a daily basis so that pilots and ground crew are always on top of their game in case they are quickly called into action.

Jerusalem was a totally different experience than Tel Aviv. The City is surrounded israel 1with conflict, history, and media. Because of this, it is harder for flourishing businesses to remain in the Jerusalem. Many successful companies head towards Tel Aviv once they have reached a point where they can afford to do so. However, on small business that we visited is focused on creating and keeping entrepreneurs in Jerusalem. The business helps budding entrepreneurs flush out ideas, provides them resources, and at times, invests in them during their early stages. This is all done in hopes to improve the local economy in Jerusalem, but to also show entrepreneurs that they don’t need to pack up and head to Tel Aviv to be successful.

Many of the cultural, religious, and historical site visits were also very fascinating. Even though the weather didn’t completely cooperate with us, we still had an incredible time in one of the most historic regions on earth. I’d definitely recommend the Innovation Israel class to future students at Fisher.

 

 

 

 


The Man with a bowtie

As a Buckeye undergrad, I am no stranger to Dr. Gee and his adorable bowtie. He was President of Ohio State for my entire undergraduate career and the first year of my MBA program. On November 18, some Fisher students has the pleasure of having lunch with Dr. Gee and learning more about his background, views on OSU and how to keep energy and passion in your life.

Dr. E. Gordon Gee has been president of West Virginia University,  Vanderbilt, Brown and Ohio State (twice – because we are that awesome). In 2010, Time Magazine rated Gee one of the top 10 college presidents in the United States.

During the lunch, Dr. Gee talked about his love for Ohio State. He explained that it was a challenge, and opportunity, to pull together all the departments at OSU. The diversity allowed for connections to be made  by the OSU Medical Center, the College of Law, the College of Engineering and the Business School. He outlined his view of Fisher being tied to the integrity of the University and that it is essential for the university as a whole to constantly reinvent itself.

I thought it was refreshing to hear a leader talk openly about making mistakes – but also about learning from the past and moving forward. Dr. Gee emphasized the need to stay true to yourself, “Even if I failed, I made sure  I was going to do it having fun and with personality.” Students asked about dealing with criticism – and in typical  Gee fashion – the man just laughed. He said that he has received enough criticism till fill hundreds of books and that it typically isn’t about you as a person, but your actions.

Gee’s 5 keys too success:

  • Have self-confidence
  • Play to your own strengths
  • Have thick skin
  • Have a sense of humor
  • Have nerves like sewer pipes
  • Keep your passion – “If you don’t believe in what you’re doing, you want last very long”

Gordon Gee Brutus!
Could this man be any more adorable!?

My favorite takeaway from the entire lunch was Dr. Gee’s take on family and balance. He told how he is a workaholic, but looking back, regrets missing some important family moments. As he said, there is no substitute for a loving family, a good home and caring friends. 

 

 


Let’s Do Lunch

Jesse Tyson (left), former Global Aviation Leader for ExxonMobil came to speak at a Cullman Luncheon in late September 2013

Recently, I had the opportunity to attend a Cullman luncheon with the former President and COO of Wilson’s Leather, Dave Rogers. Earlier this fall I participated in a Cullman Luncheon that featured Jesse Tyson, Global Aviation Leader for ExxonMobil. The Cullman Executive Luncheon Series is designed to bring 10-15 graduate students and senior executives, many of whom are also graduates of Fisher, together in an informal setting. Past executives have identified their current roles, discussed work history, and have provided insights into business in general. There is also a time for Q&A at the end.

Personally, it was hugely beneficial to interact with and glean “best practices” from these executives who had 35+ year careers to draw upon. Jesse and Dave both shared things that they did well and also shared about things to avoid as a manager and an executive. The questions asked by my fellow classmates were also very informative and brought out the richness of their experiences in business.

In an age where there seems to be a lack of either good or ethical leadership, the luncheon was a great way to get face to face with an executive who led well and could share those experiences and lessons learned along the way.

Jack Detzel, Director of Supply Chain Capability & Baseline Optimization/Productivity for PepsiCo, is coming to speak at a Cullman Luncheon in October

Craig Bahner, Fisher alumnus and Wendy’s chief marketing officer came to speak at a Cullman luncheon in April 2013

 


OSU Sites to See Before Graduation

It’s not too late to see some of the best spots on OSU campus!  Here are some of my favorites from undergrad and this past year in the Fisher MAcc:

Orton Hall

I love hearing the chimes of the Orton Tower bells when I’m walking along the Oval on campus.  If you’re lucky, you can hear them playing “Carmen Ohio,” our school’s alma mater.  One of my favorite memories from my time here as an undergrad was walking across the Oval back to my dorm on South Campus with my sister one winter evening.  It had just snowed, so there was a foot or two on the ground.  We proceeded to drop our backpacks and make snow angels in the fresh snow when “Carmen Ohio” started playing on the bells.  I’ll never forget times like that when I felt so happy to be a Buckeye!

For anyone interested, you can actually climb the Orton Bell Tower next Wednesday, May 1, from 6-9 PM, as part of OSU Commencement Week!

The beautiful Orton Hall (photo courtesy of Ohio State)

Ohio Stadium

I can’t think of any fall quarter or semester here at Ohio State without recalling some incredible football games in the ‘Shoe.  I walked across the field at convocation to start off my freshman year at Ohio State, and I cannot believe it’s already next Sunday when I’ll be crossing the field again, this time as a graduate.  This is definitely a must-see on any tour of campus, and I highly suggest taking photos outside the ‘Shoe on graduation day!

The ‘Shoe at night (photo courtesy of Ohio State)

Mirror Lake

This area of campus is special to me, because South Campus was my home as a freshman.  I crossed the South Oval and saw the fountains of Mirror Lake every day walking to class.  Although the most memorable time at Mirror Lake for many students is the Mirror Lake jump before the Michigan game, it’s definitely still a great place to check out on any spring day.

Thompson Library

Any tour of campus is incomplete without stopping into Thompson Library to see the giant book stacks and take a trip to the 11th floor Reading Room.  The 11th floor offers 360-degree views of campus and downtown Columbus.  But be careful – this is a quiet study room, so you might get glares from students trying to study during finals week if you’re too loud!

Thompson Library on a spring day (photo courtesy of Ohio State)

There are plenty more special spots for OSU students.  That’s one of my favorite things about being part of such a huge campus:  50,000 students all love something different about this university.  You can actually take a “Things You Never Got To See” Tour during Commencement Week as well to check out some of the more popular buildings.  For all of you graduates – don’t leave campus without at least taking a stroll through the Oval and soaking up some sun with your fellow Buckeyes before taking off and starting your new careers!


Finish Out Strong

For the last couple of weeks, I have had to be “on guard” against the temptations to shirk (Thank you, Prof. Chuck S. ) my graduate student responsibilities.  For the most part, the weather has been cooperative at best – cooperatively trying to lure me into postponing some of my final papers and presentations in order to indulge in some short-term fun in the sun now that the swimming pool at my apartment building is open :/ Amidst all the lures of life, the last two weeks have sweetly and politely reminded me of this one thing:  I am not done…yet.
Like any graduate student at this time, I have contracted an acute case of GMTHOH-itis.  For those of you who aren’t terribly astute, here is the more pedestrian exegesis:  Get-Me-The-Heck-Outta-Here-itis. As much as I “want” to be done with spring quarter, I must come to terms with the fact that I am not.  Despite my course workload being easy, it still can be tempting for anyone (even yours truly) to avoid, dodge, duck, cheat, evade, eschew, elude, skulk, malinger, slough, sneak, snake and/or pussyfoot the last leg of the race we call graduate school.
So while I cut this blog short in order to attend to my graduate student responsibilities, let’s remember to finish the final two weeks of graduate school out strong!

Ohio State vs. Michigan: A Time-Honored Tradition

I am proud to say that I have never been a student at OSU to witness a defeat to “that team up north.” I was a little worried this year that tradition might come to an end, but this Thanksgiving weekend the Buckeyes did not fail to produce a big W. There is so much team spirit at the game before and after that is makes for quite an experience.

There are so many incredible traditions that come with this game, that an entire week is dedicated to following these traditions exactly as they have done for over 100 years. This week was the annual Mirror Lake Jump in which thousands of students descend upon teeny, tiny mirror lake to jump in the water for what is supposed to be a good-luck charm to defeating M*ch*g*n. The weather is always below or at freezing, which makes for quite the evening. People usually start jumping in at about 9pm and people jump probably until around 2am. There are police and ambulances all over in case of an emergency as well as those who just want to watch the mayhem and not participate by jumping in the lake. It is normally on the Thursday before the game, but since this year was Thanksgiving, the jump was scheduled for Tuesday before the game. Also a tradition is the many rivalries that occur between both schools through various student organizations. Fraternities have blood drives to try to beat other fraternities from M*ch*g*n in blood giving. Finally, OUAB (the student activities board) hosts a Beat M*ch*g*n crafts night, for students to prepare items for the game.

There are some things about this game, that as an OSU student, must be observed. As seen above (in the previous paragraph), the word M*ch*g*n should be spelled in writing with stars or referred to as “that team up north” instead of using their actual name. Also, stores that carry Big Ten items with all of the schools, are supposed to place the M*ch*g*n flag upside down.

This year there were a few new traditions that were added to the continuously growing list. One of my new favorite things I saw this year for Beat M*ch*g*n week, we the “Dump the Blue” campaign at some of the local bookstores. Students had the option to get rid of any blue clothing they had in exchange for a red rally towel to be used at the game on Saturday. Another of my other favorite things about this years game was the chant at the end of the game that was, “SEVEN STRAIGHT” alluding to the fact that OSU has beaten these opponents seven times in a row.

Here’s hoping it will be eight straight next year…. Go Bucks!

The first picture is from the OSU vs. UM 2006 #1 vs #2 “game of the century” after everyone rushed the field.

Tim and Rebecca

Another from 2006….Thank you to “Block O” for creating this gem…..

No to Michigan

Finally, we made it to AA deck!!! Picture from the 2010 game….

view from seats

OSU vs. UM 2010 view from our seats


Penn State vs Ohio State

Football season is one of the best parts of autumn quarter at Ohio State.  Ohio is plagued by awful NFL teams – specifically the Browns but I guess the Bengals also need to be put in this category.   Despite the Browns and Bengals struggles, the OSU Buckeyes are consistently a powerhouse in college football.  This helps my sanity as the Bengals season continues to implode.

Although the Buckeyes won’t battle for the national championship this January, they still have a great shot to represent the Big Ten in the Rose Bowl.  This past weekend the Buckeyes played the Nittany Lions and came out victorious despite a few first half scares.

Regardless of the win, this weekend was really great because a few of my undergraduate classmates came to town to visit and watch the game.  I wasn’t able to get tickets for everyone, so I sold my ticket and we all went to the Varsity Club to watch the game with hundreds of other fans.  If you ever aren’t able to go to a game, I highly recommend you watch at the Varsity Club.  It turns into quite the scene by the fourth quarter.


A day in my shoes

I’ve always wanted to record a day in my life, but my life has generally been too boring to record.  I’m not saying that my life is now any less boring, but it is a lot busier.  Here is a general layout of my Mondays & Wednesdays.

———————————

6:40 – Alarm clock rings.  I quickly turn it off and roll back over for a few more minutes of sleep.

6:45 AM – Phone alarm sounds.  This alarm I can’t ignore since my phone is on the other side of the room.  I get up, turn off my phone and quickly browse the 13 emails I received overnight.   Most of the emails are from the university… they get deleted.  A handful of other emails are regarding group projects, so I hold off reading them until later in the day when I am more alert.

6:50 – I quickly eat breakfast even though I am not hungry – I realize in a few hours I’ll be starving if I don’t eat.

7:00 – I jump in the shower.  I’m already running late.  I quickly dry off, dress, pack my books and head out the door to the Fisher College of Business.

7:20 – I roll up to the St. John’s Arena/ ROTC parking lot and claim one of the best spots since no one else is awake – even the army reserves.

7:27 – I stroll into Schoenbaum Hall to teach the BA499 recitation.  About 34 of my students are already there.  It will be another 10-15 minutes for the next 6 to show up.

7:30 – 9:18 –> I start teaching the BA499 class.  Today each student has to turn in their first paper of the quarter and they also have to do their elevator speech in front of the class.  Overall, everyone does a great job and we manage to have fun in the process.

9:30 – 11:18 –> I start my second BA499 recitation class.  This time most of the students are on time.  This class is livelier since they were able to sleep a few additional hours.  I’m significantly better teaching this class since it is my second time through the material.

11:30 AM – 12:10 PM –> I arrive at Gerlach Hall and spend a half hour replying to emails and making sure I’m prepared for classes.

12:20 PM – 1:20 –> I meet with fellow members of FGSA and interview a classmate about a new student organization focused on Risk Management.  The meeting goes well and we determine that the group has merit but we need to gauge student body interest before we approve the organization.

1:23 – 1:27 –-> I inhale a PB&J sandwich I packed the night before.  I recently bought a plastic container to protect my sandwich from getting smashed.  Unfortunately I have been unable to successfully remove the Crayola sticker on the front of my container so I take a ribbing from a few classmates.  This doesn’t bother me because my sandwich is 3 times thicker now that it can’t get smashed while in my bag.

1:30 – 3:20 –> I attend class on Organizational Turnarounds taught by Jeff Rodek, former CEO of Hyperion.  In this class, we analyze the decisions Professor Rodek took while he was the Chief Executive of Hyperion.

3:30 -5:45 –> Standing meeting with my finance group to go over the next day’s homework for Dean Wruck’s valuations class.

6:00 – 7:45 –>  Attend Jay Barney’s Advanced Strategic Analysis class.  Professor Barney cold calls students based on names he randomly selects before class.  This makes me nervous because I usually have a good response to half his questions.  The goal is get selected for a question you can answer, otherwise you get labeled “the stupid kid.”

7:47 – I quickly run downstairs to grab a cup of coffee because my day is still not over.

8:00 – 9:45 PM –> Attend Steven Young’s Financial Institutions class.  At this point, I am on the verge of falling asleep despite the coffee.  It has nothing to do with the Professor or the class.  In fact, I think it is one of the more interesting classes I have taken at Fisher.  It really doesn’t matter how much coffee you drink, at this point I have been up since 6:40AM and have only had a bowl of cereal and a triple stuffed PB&J sandwich.

9:50 – Leave Gerlach, head to my car.  On the walk I start to plan out my dinner options.

10:00 – Eat dinner, respond to emails from students in my class, complete my homework for Dean Wruck’s class tomorrow, and organize the assignments from the two classes I taught earlier in the day.

1 AM – Finish Dean Wruck’s assignment.  Convince myself that I’m actually too tired to do anything else.  End up going to bed.

1:01AM – Fall asleep


The End of Summer

After a summer absence from blogging, I’m officially back.   Why the long absence you wonder?  My answer is two parts: first, when the weather is nice I try using my computer an absolute minimum.  Second, my computer had a hardware malfunction and I couldn’t type anything without wanting to slam my computer against a wall.  For a few months I thought I had set my default settings to the “sticky key” format but after several long phone calls with Dell, it turned out my computer keyboard was shot and my DVD reader was also broken.  Fortunately I was able to replace the parts before my warranty expired.   Now business school is in full gear and this blog will become part of my routine again, especially as the days slowly become shorter and colder.   Since so much time has elapsed, I’ll give some quick updates.

  • Cardinal Health- This summer I spent 12 weeks interning at Cardinal Health in the Nuclear Pharmacy Services Division.  This finance internship drastically improved my excel skills and I was able to apply several business school concepts to the position.  Overall the internship went very well and I am going to stay in conversations with Cardinal Health about a full time position next year.
  • Teaching Assistant – I accepted a TA position for an undergraduate class taught by Dr. Tansky.   This is a 20 hour TA, so I won’t have much free time this year, but I couldn’t pass up an opportunity to have my tuition waived.  I also see this as a great opportunity to practice my own public speaking skills.
  • FGSA –  Last spring, I was elected President of FGSA.  Over the summer I spent several hours each week preparing for the upcoming year and planning endless meetings.  Between my TA and my involvement with FGSA, I will have little to no free time.
  • Upcoming classes – I’ll be taking four classes this quarter.  Two finance classes, a strategy class and a leadership class.  I’m going to major in Finance and Strategy, so this year will be mostly quantitative.

That’s pretty much it.  I think we are all caught up on my last three months.  Overall my summer was really busy, but I was able to get a lot out of it and even sneak in a few relaxing weekends.  My goal now is to start blogging once a week.  Stay tuned.


March Madness

Two rounds into the NCAA basketball tournament and I can officially throw my bracket in the trash.  I picked Kansas, Kentucky, Vanderbilt and Villanova to make it to the Final Four… only Kentucky remains alive.  You might be curious why I didn’t take the very talented number two seed Ohio State Buckeyes to go to the Final Four instead of Kansas.  My answer is three-fold.  First, it is a well-known fact that my teams never do well in the NCAA tournament.  I am cursed.  If I pick you, then you lose… usually in a painful, last second choke kind of way.  Second, Kansas is a tough team and I really questioned Ohio State’s ability to beat perhaps the best team in the tournament.  It is no secret that Ohio State relies too heavily on Evan Turner to get them out of sticky situations.  Why should I have believed that Diebler, Buford, Lighty and Lauderdale would all of a sudden make meaningful contributions to the team at clutch points in the game?  Third, I figured everyone who I was competing against would have Ohio State beating Kansas out of some sense of pride and loyalty to the University.  It’s not that I don’t have these things; it’s just that I really, really wanted to win the prize money and the ability to boast about my basketball picking ability.  If Ohio State would have lost as I predicted and if Kansas would have won the tournament, I would easily have won the pool since no one else would have had similar picks.  It’s too bad none of my strategies ever seem to work as I envision.  Fortunately this time the results aren’t entirely negative… Ohio State is still in the tournament and most of the really good teams that would have posed a challenge to them have already been knocked out.  Sure my bracket is complete garbage, but maybe this March might just be the month of the Buckeyes.

Worst Bracket Ever

Worst bracket ever

Joseph Fahrendorf

OSU's William Buford giving a #1


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