Fisher Follies

While the Fisher College of Business has many excellent clubs and organizations that work to benefit its student’s professional and cultural experiences, only one organization is focused on providing students with financial support when they fall under some unexpected misfortune.

Fisher Follies is a student-run organization whose focus is on providing bridge funds to students who need help when the unexpected takes place. These unexpected costs range anywhere from car repairs and broken laptops, to providing support for students who need to move due to issues with their apartments.  Due to its philanthropic initiatives and student focus, it is one of the most highly regarded and actively involved organizations on campus.

To help fund these activities Fisher Follies hosts one of the most exciting and highly anticipated events of the year, the Follies Auction.

The Follies Auction is generally held in the Autumn Semester  and is primarily funded through donations from students, alumni, and faculty.  In the silent auction phase of the night, attendees have the ability to make bids on a variety of items and experiences that can range from cooking classes and Airbnb stays, to outdoor adventures including trap shooting and rock climbing.  Some of our most popular items this year included babysitting and dog sitting provided by students, as well as a homemade OSU quilt.  During the live auction half of the night, the bigger donations are put up for bid.  This year, the big-ticket item was a suite at the Schottenstein Arena for up to 12 people with food and drinks included, donated by OSU Athletic Director, Gene Smith.

With the funds raised through this night, Fisher Follies continues to be of great help to the student body, while providing one of the most unforgettable evenings of the school year!

Neighborhood Feature: German Village

Graduate School is a comprehensive experience that encompasses so much more than just the classroom learning.  For Fisher MBA students, the experience is enhanced by the vibrant city surrounding us.  The city of Columbus is an amazing city comprised of small neighborhoods that offer a wide array of things to see and do. Each neighborhood is distinct, with its own unique feeling, history, restaurants, and places to hangout. While working on your MBA, it would be a shame to miss out on experiencing everything that make Columbus the #1 city for young millennials.  Each month, I will be featuring a different neighborhood and explore how each of these unique communities come together to make Columbus such a diverse and distinctive city.

First up is German Village, as this is where I have lived for the past three years. German Village was settled in the early 1830’s by a wave of German immigrants who came to Columbus to work in the factories and industrial sector. They moved to the southern side of downtown, as at the time this was open farm fields and the cheapest place to buy land for the largely poverty-stricken immigrants. By the end of the Civil War, almost 40% of Columbus was of German ancestry, German language newspapers outnumbered English newspapers, and the neighborhood flourished. Large brick houses were built along quaint brick streets lined with trees and flowers. After WWI, anti-German sentiment increased dramatically. German language schools were closed down, German newspapers were burned, German street names were changed to more “American” sounding names like Liberty, Main, 3rd, and High street, and many of the German immigrants moved out of German village. By the 1950s German village had become a slum, and the city demolished 1/3rd of the neighborhood to build Interstate 70. In the 1970s, a young architect named Frank Fetch realized the potential of the beautiful old derelict brick houses, and bought a house in the middle of German Village, renovated it, and created the German Village Society to convince other wealthy Columbus families to buy and restore these beautiful houses. Today, German Village is once again thriving and has retained much of its original character.  In fact, it is now one of the largest historic districts in the country!

Suggested things to do in German Village:

  • Walk the brick streets and enjoy the traditional German-American architecture, checking out local shops and art galleries along the way
  • Explore Schiller Park, a large quiet green oasis full of people, dogs, and compelling art installations
  • Try Schmidt’s Sausage House or Valther’s for a hearty German meal
  • Need caffeine or a place to study?  Stauf’s Coffee house is a local coffee shop and roaster
  • Get lost in literature at the Book Loft, an enchanting brick house that’s been converted into a unique book store, featuring 32 rooms overflowing with books for sale
  • Experience the German Village “Haus und Garten Tour” where local residents open up their house to give guests a look inside their beautifully restored brick mansions.
  • Find the Little’s House on 3rd street; the mouse’s house is usually decorated for each holiday.

Whether you want to walk around brick streets enjoying the view, get a good cup of coffee, find a new book to read, or eat some good German food, there is something for everyone in German Village.

Doubling Up: Becoming a Double Buckeye!

I didn’t know what being a Double Buckeye meant until I truly started to embrace the meaning of one earlier this year! You see, returning to Ohio State to pursue an MBA on Fisher’s renowned campus was a journey home for me. I grew up an hour west of Ohio State and later graduated from here with a degree in Industrial & Systems Engineering in 2012, so I was already familiar with Ohio State’s highly ranked football team, the vast resources accessible to OSU students, and the surrounding city of Columbus.  What more was there for me to experience here, I thought?  But that question disappeared as quickly as it came and I soon discovered that coming back to Fisher for my MBA was an entirely new and exciting experience.

In March 2019, I got a chance to experience Fisher’s culture firsthand by meeting with my new classmates and friends while dining over the football stadium. Through the Red Carpet Weekend Experience, Fisher’s Graduate Programs Office confirmed for me the main reasons I came back to Ohio State: the people and the culture. The culture at Fisher is both collaborative and diverse while maintaining a spark of competitiveness, which speaks to the high level of intelligence that I am surrounded with every single day!

The first four months have been life-changing as I have explored areas through this program and within myself that I never would have dreamed. I am using this journey to create, lead, and inspire others, which is what I have always wanted to do. I do this every day in my classes, but also through the passion projects that I work on outside of the classroom.  In August, I got to soar high at Summit Vision to face my fear of heights, and trust in my classmates to get me through.  I have toiled through my core courses together with classmates during long nights of studying for exams that felt like they would never end at times.  Sometimes this results in a euphoric breakthrough.  Other times it means being encouraged by a classmate to persevere when I want to quit.  In either case, this is our collaborative Fisher spirit shining bright.  We celebrate each other’s victories and we fight for each other in the face of challenges.

Most importantly, to me, is that the journey to finding out the type of leader I am is ever more lucid. Every single experience that I have with my colleagues, and now friends, is shaping me into the person I want to be every minute of every hour of every day.

The biggest thing I have discovered in returning to OSU is that this is not simply a walk down memory lane or a homecoming.  No, this is a continuation of my journey filled with unique adventures serving as the gateway to my future.  While I don’t know where the journey will end, I do know where it begins – and that’s with me! I am flying first class into the future.  Why?  Because a Double Buckeye would do it no other way!

Global Applied Projects | New Delhi

Global Applied Projects (GAP) is a first-year MBA elective that allows small teams of students to tackle real consulting projects with international companies. The class is structured in two distinct blocks, with the first block comprising 7 weeks of class sessions aimed to develop critical skills and remote work on projects. For the second block, students travel to the client’s country and spend 3 weeks working with them on site.  Past locations include Brazil, Tanzania, France, China, and India.

This past May, I had the opportunity to travel to New Delhi, India along with 6 of my classmates for my GAP assignment.  It is one of the greatest highlights of my first year at Fisher. My team and I worked alongside leaders in the partnering company, contributed to an industry-wide analysis, and helped finish a complex project that was months in the making. In addition to the hands-on business experience, there was ample opportunity to broaden our cultural knowledge.  GAP allowed me to learn about the work culture in India and how it differs from the US.

Friday night rush hour traffic heading towards New Delhi

While our project was the primary focus of the trip, we still found time to take advantage of the weekends and sneak in some personal travel to explore New Delhi, Mumbai, and Agra. These trips made for some unforgettable experiences, including a trip to the Taj Mahal, the completion of a ghost pepper chicken lollipop challenge, and numerous rickshaw rides.

Overall, GAP was an amazing culmination of everything we learned in the first year of the MBA program.  Working through an engaging project with talented classmates in a beautiful country was the perfect conclusion to an incredible year.

Super Spicy Lollipop Challenge!

 

 

 

 

 

 

And, on to the Next Chapter

To say the Fisher MBA program has been a whirlwind is most definitely the understatement of the year. It has been the opportunity of a lifetime, the chance to pivot my career trajectory back toward social impact, an environment of experiential learning and continuous growth, one of the hardest things I have ever done, and, ultimately, an experience I will never regret, but rather, value now and into the future.

Looking back, I wonder how well prepared I was for this experience. The first year was definitely challenging and included many ups and downs. From constant interviews and internship rejections to an amazing entrepreneurial summer internship with NAWBO and a global consulting experience in Ethiopia and Kenya through GAP, first year included both some of the hardest and most rewarding parts of the program.

Going into the second year, after taking time to self-reflect and refocus over the summer, it was a slightly easier transition back into the academic world. However, the hunt for a full-time job was overwhelming at times. With the constant pressures surrounding us in this program, I found the time to take a step back and self-reflect to be essential for my journey.

Now, looking back, I wish I would have taken more time for this, as well as more time to develop relationships outside of student organizations/course work. This 2-year experience not only provides an education and opportunity for career growth, it is a chance to build and grow your network of personal and professional relationships with some of the most intelligent individuals you’ll ever meet.

Sitting in Gerlach Hall on this beautiful spring morning, I cannot help to embrace the bittersweet feeling of graduating and heading into the next chapter as an OSU alum. I am so excited for this next part of our journey, as my husband and I will be moving to Washington, DC where I recently accepted my dream job! I will be working with Management Sciences for Health (MSH), a global health NGO, in their operations and business development team. Without a combination of the experience in this program, along with taking time to self-reflect on why I came back to school in the first place, I would not be in this position today. To all pursuing this journey in the near future or finishing the program next year, I wish you all the best!

Silicon Valley Venture Capital Trek

The week after spring break, myself and a few of my MBA peers were fortunate enough to go on the Silicon Valley Venture Capital Trek in various cities – San Francisco, Santa Clara, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, and a couple others. As members of the student organization, Fisher Entrepreneurship Association (FEA), our goal is to learn about Entrepreneurship, Start-ups, Venture Capital (VC), and Investing through networking, events, and experiential opportunities. This was my first time on the trip, and it was by far one of my favorite MBA experiences so far. We met with Managing Directors, IPO Lawyers, Venture Capital Partners, and Founders & CEOs from various companies: Wilson, Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati (WSGR), Google X, EY (Ernst & Young), DFJ (now Threshold Ventures), Prevedere Inc., and Aeris, and a couple others.

Listening to professionals in this space was eye-opening. There were so many questions myself and my peers had as young minds interested in learning how to get into the start-up space and understanding what type of professional experience and knowledge you need to be successful in it. Hearing success stories, failure stories, stories about the “grind” of this world, and honest perspectives about the start-up and venture capital industry gave many of us the ability to narrow in on what we would love to do professionally in this space. For me, after a few years working in tech and sports/entertainment, I would like to start my own company which will tie my passions together.

Most interesting things I heard during the trip:

  • Most of successful companies created their own market (ex: Facebook, Google, Intel, Cisco).
  • This idea of collaboration in tech is called “coopetition”.
  • Value = product-market fit / risk (execution).
  • NETWORKING is crucial!!
  • Get a mentor.
  • 3 parts to venture: 1) sourcing, 2) due diligence, 3) portfolio.
  • People who start a company aren’t always the ones to scale it.

What venture capital firms look for in entrepreneurs:

  1. How self-aware is this person?
  2. Are they able to recognize the fires and won’t ignore the problems?
  3. Do they recognize their own strengths and weaknesses?
  4. Are they persistent and do they have the mental endurance it takes to build and grow a company?

If you’d like to learn more about VC, start-ups, and entrepreneurship, below is a list of books and videos that were suggested to my classmates and I during our trip:

  • “The Hard Thing About Hard Things” by Ben Horowitz
  • “The Art of the Start” by Guy Kawasaki
  • “The Startup Owner’s Manual: The Step-by-Step Guide for Building a Great Company” by Steve Blank & Bob Dorf
  • “Straight Talk for Startups” by Randy Komisar and Jantoon Reigersman
  • “Venture Capitalists at Work: How VCs Identify and Build Billion-Dollar Successes” by Tarnang Shah and Shital Shah
  • “Crossing the Chasm” by Geoffrey Moore
  • “Something Ventured” – Netflix movie
  • “Secrets of Silicon Valley” – YouTube

Below is a list of people you should be familiar with – learn their stories as they either successfully built up billion-dollar companies or founded VC firms with highly invested portfolio companies in the Silicon Valley area:

  • Larry Ellison – Oracle
  • Marc Andreesen – Netscape
  • Andy Grove – Intel
  • Alan Shugart – Seagate Technology
  • Gordon Moore – Intel
  • John Chambers – Cisco
  • Steve Jobs – Apple, Pixar
  • Scott McNealy – Sun Microsystems
  • John Doerr – Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers
  • Larry Sonsini – WSGR
  • Lewis Platt – Hewlett-Packard
  • James Clark – Netscape

A big thanks to Fisher College of Business, Professor Oglevee, Mr. Terranova, Mr. Coleman, and the MBA student leadership of FEA for making this trip happen and providing a wonderful growth experience.

My Favorite Class: Strategy

As an MBA student there are number of classes we take in our first year designed to given us an understanding of a wide range of business aspects, from finance and accounting to data analytics and marketing.  As someone who came from the supply chain background I found these classes to be exceptionally in learning the about industries I had not previously had experience with.  There is one class in particular that students take in their second semester that I have found really show what the MBA is all about, that class is Strategy Formulation and Implementation.

 

In this class MBA students take all of the knowledge they gained in the previous semester and apply it to cases about real companies and the decisions they made to reach a level of success and what decisions they should make when at a strategic crossroads.  This class helps to put students in the CEO’s shoes and consider all the opportunities and risks they face when considering the decisions needed to maneuver a company through the marketplace.

 

Along with the in-depth case studies and discussion-based lectures there are computer simulations that let provide students with a company their own to run, and where they can see the outcomes of their decisions.  Something as straightforward as a manufacturers decision on its delivery schedule can have profound effects on its profitability and place in the marketplace.

 

What is CAMP?

The Columbus Advertising & Marketing Practicum (CAMP) is a dynamic event hosted by the Fisher Association of Marketing Professionals (AMP) that brings together nationally recognized keynote speakers and industry professionals to discuss the leading edge of marketing. 2019 marks our tenth year hosting this event, and our discussion will center on Customer Experience Design which is the practice of designing products/services with the focus on quality and thoughtfulness of the user experience. Every touch point within the customer’s interaction with a product/service is designed to deliver experiences based on the brand’s promise. It requires companies to weave in storylines through online and offline experiences that bring the brand to life.

We invite you to join us!

What can you expect from CAMP?

100-plus attendees from the Columbus community come to hear our engaging, charismatic and fascinating speakers from local and national companies.

Our keynote speaker and recipient of the Marketer of the Year Award is Russ Klein, CEO of the American Marketing Association. We will also have Adam Torres, Founder of Torres Capital, who will be speaking at our event! Both Russ and Adam have a wealth of knowledge and experience when it comes to Customer Experience Design.

Russ Klein, CEO of American Marketing Association
Adam Torres, Founder of Torres Capital

We will also be raffling off items! Thanks to our generous sponsors, we currently have items from Watershed Distillery, Columbus Blue Jackets, Bibibop, and Homage!

If you would like to be a part of this event, whether as an attendee or sponsor, please let us know! Tickets are available here, and you can always email us at fisher.amp@gmail.com with any questions!

2018 “Marketer of the Year” award went to Jenna Measelle, Senior Brand Manager at Abbott and Fisher MBA alum

Growing Professionally and Giving Back with Fisher Board Fellows

“I now call this meeting to order…”

Sitting in on your first nonprofit board meeting can be an eye-opening experience, especially if you have never worked on a board in the past. Now, heading into my eighth month as a Board Fellow for Dress for Success-Columbus, I am able to actively participate in board meeting discussions and share updates on my resource development committee projects.

Reflecting back, being a part of Fisher Board Fellows has been a wonderful opportunity to give back to my community, better understand the governance of nonprofit organizations, apply lessons from business school to a real-world setting and grow my network. In addition, committing to the mission of Dress has grown my perspective regarding our local community needs and areas of opportunity in Columbus.

Fisher Board Fellows is a student-run organization that places students on local nonprofit boards during the second year of the program, attracting candidates from the full-time MBA, MHRM and MBA for working professionals programs. Candidates go through an application process to join the organization, complete training in the second semester and join their board in the second year of the program. As Co-Vice Chair of the organization, we work hard to maintain our relationships with our nonprofit partners and will have 34 partners this coming year!

Some of our partner boards include: United Way of Central Ohio, BalletMet, A Kid Again, LifeCare Alliance, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Local Matters, and many more. Please check out our full list here. This year, we are also excited to add several new partners including: YWCA, Flying Horse Farms, Columbus Humane, MBA Research and Curriculum Center and SmallBiz Cares.

Fellows work on a wide range of strategic projects for their organizations, ranging from donor engagement research and improvement planning to marketing and communication plans and inventory management system recommendations. In addition, fellows are provided a board mentor during their time with the organization to help navigate the new experience and set them up for success in providing impact!

This organization has been, hands-down, one of the best experiential learning opportunities during my time at Fisher and I look forward to continuing my relationship with the board post-graduation this May!

“The meeting is now adjourned!”

Global Applied Projects

As a full-time MBA student at the Fisher College of Business, you will have the opportunity to take part in the Global Applied Projects (GAP) program.  On Friday, Feb 1, our class finally found out where we would be going, the projects we would be working on, and the organizations we would be working for. As potential MBA students yourselves, I want to give you some idea of what this process is and what it entails.

The GAP program is designed to allow MBA students to participate in a global consulting workshop where, rather than just classes and simulations where students are using theory and the outcomes are no more than a letter grade, this is an opportunity to work for a real company with a real problem and who are paying real money for a real solution. The fact that these problems exist in an international setting is definitely a perk. For example, projects this year are in areas as diverse as Ethiopia, France, Brazil, China, and Malaysia.

For a timeline on how the GAP program works:

  1. In the middle of the fall semester, students will be given the opportunity to apply to the GAP program. As this is a program that provides for free international travel and a stipend for living in country, it is extremely popular and thus it is very important students have their applications in on time.
  2. At the beginning of spring semester, students will be sent a list of international projects. Upon receiving the list of projects, students will then rank these in order of preference and ability. At this time, students will not know the companies or organizations they are working for or where the projects will be placed.
  3. At the beginning of February, Fisher holds an event to announce the makeup of the students groups for each project, the organizations they will be working for, and where they will be working.
  4. In the second half of spring semester, students will begin working on their projects at weekly meetings and alongside faculty advisers to come up with realistic and actionable solutions for their target companies.
  5. For most of May, students live onsite and in-country working on their projects, and preparing to present their solution to their clients. Each student is provided with a budget that covers airfare, and a stipend for room and board that they may spend however they see fit.

The GAP program provides a wonderful opportunity for Fisher MBA students to work in a true international setting and understand all of the challenges and opportunities that exist in a global business environment.  That said, free travel to new places to work on interesting projects and gain experiences outside of our comfort zones is definitely a perk.