An Enlightening Week

Work this week began with the usual efforts, but soon turned into one of those times when everything flies by!  We got some new orders and I was spending a lot of time out of the office following up on leads and really getting into my sales role. It continues to be an exciting challenge, but I have retained my desire to keep learning and becoming more effective.  I took every opportunity to talk with the regional manager and draw from his experiences.  Slowly, all learning is paying off.  This coming week is filled with appointments.

In addition to a full work week, my wife has begun working on some home projects.  We have been married for fourteen years and she still amazes me with her persistence.  She is somehow able to be an amazing mother and tackle major household projects.  My son turned two years old this week.  He is the perfect combination of absolute sweetness tempered with the whispers of the “terrible two’s.”  The weekends are filled with me spending a lot of time with my kids, but my heart continues to break on Sunday nights as my daughter begs me not to leave for work and stay home and play with her.

School continues to be busy, but the feel of this semester is remarkably different than previous semesters.  I am fortunate to be in a class group with a diversity of experiences and perspectives.  Additionally, every member of the group is working together well and we all share a deep desire to maintain clear communications.  We have our ups and downs, but the underlying desire to be better is so motivating to me.  It makes the work so much more enjoyable.

On Saturday, I organized a volunteering day with my work colleagues and we all served at a soup kitchen.  Serving people breakfast and lunch was a truly enriching experience.  Most everyone said “thank you” as they left the cafeteria, but one moment in particular stood out.  A young girl, perhaps 4 years old, was being carried out by her older brother.  Just as she was exiting the door, she smiled, waived, and said, “Thank you!”  My colleagues and I were shocked at how touching the impact of her thanking us was. I confess that it emotionally impacted me and I felt the sensation deep in my heart.  It was truly a memorable week.

Buckeyes, Inc.: MBA Meets NCAA

Hi, everyone! My name is Catherine Banton and I am a second year, full-time MBA candidate here at Fisher working as one of our admission ambassadors in our Graduate Programs Office for the academic year. I’m originally from a small suburb of Seattle, WA and moved to Ohio after living and working in Los Angeles, CA for seven years.

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This is me with my pal Brutus when I visited Columbus for the first time in May 2015!

When I meet new first year MBA students in the full-time program, or when I’m introducing myself to our campus visitors, I often get the question, “If you lived in Southern California, how (and why) are you living in Ohio? Don’t you miss it?!” My answer is simple: the people in Ohio make this a great place to live and work, and the opportunities here are endless. I’ve had experiences here at Fisher and in Columbus that I wouldn’t be able to have anywhere else, and I am excited to share one of those with you in this blog post!

I’m convinced that no other MBA program offers a course like the one I am taking this semester: The Business of College Sports. This class is one of the elective options in my Leadership and Organizational Behavior major. It’s taught by none other than The Ohio State University’s own Athletic Direction Gene Smith (more about him here) and his amazing wife Sheila, who runs a successful fundraising and development consulting firm here in Columbus (and is a former star athlete and coach herself). Gene Smith is arguably one of the most well-known and respected athletic directors in the nation, and has been at the helm of tOSU’s athletics for more than 10 years as programs like men’s football have made historic championship runs (Go, Bucks!). The course’s student make-up in and of itself is unique: a mix of full-time and part-time MBAs along with MAcc, SMF, MHRM, and Master of Sports Management students make the discussions and dialogue in class engaging and enlightening, and we get to work on projects in teams that mix programs to further learn from each other.

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Our fearless classroom leaders, Sheila and Gene Smith

While you might initially think, “What could college sports and business possibly have to do with one another?” this course turns that misconception on its head – and quickly. Gene and Sheila bring in high-ranking members of the athletic department to speak candidly with us about everything from trademark licensing and partnership negotiations, to coaches’ contracts and revenue drivers for the university’s athletic events. While each guest speaker comes into class with PowerPoint decks and a planned presentation, they are all very open to student questions and truly give us special insight into how the athletic department functions and what goes into keeping a multi-million dollar organization within the university functioning smoothly and successfully.

The in-class experience is fascinating, but the out-of-class activities are what make our Buckeye fans’ hearts stop and keep our camera phone snapping. Throughout the semester, our class has the privilege of visiting Ohio State’s most prized and beloved athletic facilities, including Ohio Stadium, the Woody Hayes Athletic Center, and the Jerome Schottenstein Center.

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We were surrounded by Heisman and National Championship trophies in the entry way of the Woody Hayes Athletic Center!

Long-time staff members of the athletic department take us on guided, personal tours of each venue, explaining to us the history, significance and use of each room, hallway and collection. The best part is, we also meet special, unexpected guests during our visits! We had our first tour this week – of the Woody Hayes Athletic Center – and to our shock and delight, head football coach Urban Meyer appeared on the practice turf while we were taking pictures to share with us some thoughts from last weekend’s exhilarating game against Oklahoma (remember that wrap-around catch by Noah Brown?!) and the importance of the facility in player recruiting, team wellness, and program fundraising.

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This picture was taken moments before Ohio State football head coach Urban Meyer surprised us with an appearance on the practice turf!
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Our tour guide Mark took great care of us as we walked through the facility!

Since starting this course, I’m much more aware of the use of the Ohio State brand all around me, and I find myself thinking about different things when I watch my beloved Bucks compete for their next win. How much revenue was generated from food and beverage sales at the game today? What would-be sponsors may have used the OSU or Buckeye logos incorrectly in their game day flyers or signs? How will our championship run this year affect top and bottom line growth for the athletic department’s finances? As much as I enjoy cheering on our teams from the stands or in front of my TV as a fan, my perspective is now broader and deeper when it comes to understanding Ohio State’s sports teams and the administration behind them – all because of my time spent in the Fisher MBA program and the opportunity to take such a unique class with unheard-of access to one of the most important athletic directors in the nation today.

My advice to potential applicants to Fisher is: don’t forget to consider seemingly “less important” (but equally formative and fulfilling) things like elective courses and special life experiences when looking at an MBA program. Some schools offer incredible opportunities to take part in courses or events that just can’t be replicated on another campus – like this Business of College Sports class – and if you don’t take the time to look into these things, you might regret it later on in the process!

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The coach, the man, the legend: Woody Hayes.
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THE National Champions of the past, present and future!

A Juggling Act

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“Work-Life balance” is a phrase I’ve been thinking about a lot lately. My first two weeks of grad school consisted of 12 hours of class, 40 hours of work, 2 career workshops, 3 informational meetings, 1 career fair and several long hours of reading (exact number unknown). I ate a lot of fast food, slept far less than the recommended daily average, and managed to wash exactly zero dishes. Let me tell you, grad school at the Fisher College of Business is no joke.

I’ve always considered juggling one of my strengths (no, not literal juggling). But by the end of the first week, I already felt myself floundering– barely treading water to stay afloat in the sea of opportunity. I found myself looking around in my classes, wondering how the heck is everyone else doing it?! How do I juggle work, school, and a social life, which are all arguably—and certainly in my opinion— components of a healthy life? Is it okay for one to win out over the others, or even more dramatically, to drop one entirely so the other two can survive? Well, I decided to ask around and collect some data.

The bad news: no one really knows how to do it. The good news: everyone is in it together.

More on the bad news:

Well, it could be more accurate (and less sourpuss) to say that the jury is out on how to best juggle the trifecta of work, school, and a social presence– and everyone has their own strategy. My advice in three simple steps:

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  1. Schedule: Have one. Plan out what needs to be done and do the things you tell yourself you’re going to do. It feels good to deliver in tangible ways and to follow-through—for yourself. In the words of a wise Morgan Hite, “there is no substitute for sanity.”
  2. Make time for the things that reinvigorate you: This is important. Spend time with people you love, have a beer with a friend, watch stand-up comedy, blast the music in your car and sing at the top of your lungs. These are a few things that help me put chaos back into perspective.
  3. Take Pleasure in the Simple Things: Even when you feel like you don’t have time. Get some fresh air, people watch on campus, enjoy the walk home from class, appreciate the full moon and the sound of summer nights while they last. Try not to rush—appreciate the transition times as much as the activities themselves.

More on the good news:

We’re in this together. I’ve known my cohort for less than three weeks, and I already feel we understand one another better than most. There’s something about being stressed together that connects people on a deeper level. I realize now that I’ve missed this feeling from undergrad.

Maybe it’s because we’re like-minded people who genuinely care about helping people become the best version of themselves (call it HR). Maybe I just lucked out in the gamble of grad school cohorts. But when I think about the last few weeks, one word dominates—grateful. I am grateful to be treading water in this sea of opportunity and wisdom that is the Fisher College of Business. It is one of the best “problems” to have.

Paraphrased from the wise Dr. Larry Inks (Clinical Associate Professor at FCOB), there’s only one thing to do with the towel of experiences that make up life—wring it out and soak ’em up.

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“Shape the Game”

Well, I am hot ‘n’ heavy into my first semester! I must admit that I feel a bit overwhelmed. It’s a manageable “overwhelment,” but it’s become clear to me that time will be precious while in the MHRM program. In addition to the core courses, I’m taking two electives this session (and probably one elective next session) and serving as a graduate administrative assistant for the college. I also am going to try to re-launch the Fisher LGBT affinity group (called “Out in Business”) sometime soon if I can get the time to do it! (For a myriad of reasons, the group is currently inactive, although Fisher is absolutely inclusive and welcoming with LGBT students.

Anyway, one of my favorite courses thus far is called “Organizational Turnarounds.” The crux is: how do you turnaround failing organizations? Senior Lecturer Jeff Rodek teaches the (popular) course. We’re learning that this difficult task requires a lot of structured, but quick decision-making. In addition to a textbook, we’re gleaning insight from case studies and articles… AND Mr. Rodek himself. He’s a former CEO of Hyperion Solutions– and he was charged with doing his own turnaround of the company. You can read quite a bit online about his time there. What’s awesome about the class is that the students are required to analyze and assess HIS performance at Hyperion– the good, bad, and ugly. It’s part of our first group paper.

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Mr. Rodek himself

He’s incredibly open and honest about his experience as CEO. He doesn’t sugarcoat it. He’s reflective of things he did well and things he’d like to go back and change. And he wants us to learn from it. How cool is that? This isn’t some professor who’s been buried in research for years; he’s been in the thick of things and he’s sharing his insight and knowledge with us. He also has a great sense of humor and really tries to spark good conversation in the classroom.

One thing he said in class this week– and this was really a very small comment related to the topic at hand, but immediately hit me– is the need to “shape the game” as leaders (particularly during a turnaround), not just “play the game.” As someone who’s told friends and colleagues many times to play the game, I really appreciated his revision of this mantra. It resonated with me. Shape your experiences and relationships in the way you want them to be shaped; take change of your own destiny rather than being a willing bystander.

And it applies to what I’m doing now as a student. Despite the stress, I’ve reminded myself that I am here because I want a challenge. I’m here to grow. I’m here to be the best. So, I’m going to work hard, build relationships, and learn as much as I can to shape my professional and personal life in the way I want it to be. O-H-I-O!

Dancing with My Daughter

The first week back started with a ‘Kick off’ session of the inaugural Fisher Leadership Program of which I was selected to be a part.  Being around talented colleagues, hearing the overview of the program, getting details of the individual electives, and meeting the person I’m to mentor were all extremely motivating.

“Performance Management, Learning and Design” and “Business Excellence Two” are the classes that I signed up to take this semester.  After a summer of working in ‘Learning and Development,’ I found the first week of classes extremely relevant to my recent experiences.  Although not too overwhelming, it was a shock to jump back into the extensive reading assignments.  I felt different in my approach to both the assignments and group interactions.  From my internship, I was more confident about how to approach both.

During this first week, I also continued the Office Exchange Program that I had done during the first year of my work as a staffing coordinator.  Additionally, I also inquired about and got promoted to a Sales Account Executive position.  I felt that this would be a perfect opportunity to  learn more about the sales side of the business and an opportunity to develop professionally and personally.

At the end of the week, I got a text from my MHRM cohort showing a group photo of them after a team building experience opportunity.  Initially, I wanted to participate in this event, but decided not to sign up because I was away from my family most of the summer due to the internship in Maryland.  There are certain moments where you decide why you work.  My week ended dancing with my daughter to the song ‘When Can I See You Again?’ by Owl City.

Challenge by Choice

This past weekend, the MHRM Class of ’18 (alongside some amazing class of ’17 peers) went out into the wilderness for Summit Vision 2016! What an experience– and what a way to bond through sweat, tears, and laughter. The day began with several challenges that are top secret “For Your Eyes Only”-type missions. Let’s just say it involved tennis ball “values”, PVC pipe, and one very brave, nimble team member named Billy. One key statement that came about completing these first set of challenges was this idea of “Analysis Paralysis.” That’s where you spend too much time thinking strategy that you end up in a continuous loop of ideas with no action! Once we were given a time limit, we rushed to complete– and eventually won through our communication, determination, and grit.

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We split into teams and headed into the woods. Now for the true wild stuff! First, Team 3 (but really we were number one) had to complete challenges on a large bridge-type teeter-totter. Again the challenges are hush-hush; however, some very important things came about. First, in our group of fifteen there were so many great ideas, and what was even better was the fact that we listened to each other! Five challenges brought about five different leaders, and a multitude of great ideas. We constantly tried new things never fearing major consequences, because we trusted each other and knew we would just think of the next idea if the original failed.  We constantly remembered “Analysis Paralysis” and just went with it. The final challenge showed that when an idea that fourteen of the fifteen group members were highly skeptical, yet we trusted and just took a leap of faith (quite literally).

The last thing that really stuck with my from Summit Vision is this idea of challenge by choice. You always want to grow and develop, and the only way to do that is to challenge yourself to push beyond your comfort zone. I am terrified of the idea of falling from heights (thank you, genetics). One of the obstacles was a pendulum-style wire swing. You have to climb up these narrow rungs, stay at the top of a platform, and then right before you swing you have to edge your way to the millimeter edge and just go. I was so scared, and shaking through every bone, muscle, and fiber in my body. However, I heard so many words of encouragement; but, what pushed me over the edge was knowing if I can make it from Ohio to Georgia and go through grad school, then a swing was not going to hinder my learning!

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(Conquering my fear of falling and pushing myself out of my comfort zone)

At the end of the day we regrouped, reflected, and talked about our gold (what our group has value and strength in) and our goal (our group/individual potential). Today I know that our gold is certainly our support, and my personal goal is trying new things even if they scare me. It also helps that there are people surrounding me that support and help me push through. (It also helps to debrief with a nice Columbus Crew victory as well).

Always remember to avoid analysis paralysis, and sometimes if it’s scary to find you a supportive group, and just take a leap of faith. The further from your comfort zone you are, then the stronger you are going to become in the end.

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Go Buckeyes!

Chase Lakhani

A Quick Summer Internship

I prepared everything possible for my trip to Columbia, MD and the beginning of my internship with Frito-Lay.  I had made all the arrangements with taking a break with my job, prepared all the living arrangements, and my car was completely packed out.  One of the most difficult moments in my life occurred as I said goodbye to my wife, daughter, and son.  I managed to keep myself composed as I said, “goodbye” and started to walk to my car.  My 20 month old son then motioned towards me.  He was asking for another hug.  We embraced and he began patting my back with his hand.  I was no longer able to keep my composure and accepted the fact that I was going to be the farthest from my children and wife that I had ever been.

My first week at Frito-Lay I was torn between desperately missing my family, excitement about the adventure ahead, and the desire to take advantage of this unique opportunity.  I was assigned one large project to complete over the summer.  I was asked to combine multiple career development resources into a single, “one stop shop” with easy access.  The whole summer flew by, but I took every opportunity to ask questions, network with people, and learn about the company.  My persistent curiosity resulted in developing an Excel-based career development software linking multiple career tools in a single tool.  What an amazing summer!

Imagine Yourself Thriving

Hi, Friends!

My name is Nikki Villoria and I am a first year MHRM student. Just a bit about me: I am from Alexandria, VA and attended The Ohio State University for my undergraduate degree in Psychology (I’m a proud double Buckeye!). I graduated in 2015 and this past year, I worked as an Educational Leadership Consultant for Alpha Xi Delta Women’s Fraternity. It was a wonderful experience to be able to travel and meet many different women across the nation. Mainly, I assisted in the areas of project management, leadership development, and recruitment and retention. I am excited to be going back to school to become an expert in the field of HR! I’ll be posting regularly throughout the school year so I hope you enjoy following me along on my journey!

Here’s a little look into the early days of graduate school life:

August 22, 2016: The day before classes officially start at Ohio State. The anticipation is quite high! Whether it’s been a few years since we’ve been in a classroom or we’re just ready to start studying a subject that really interests us, it seems that my peers and I are really excited to get going!

Today was also the day for the New Graduate Student Welcome and Resource Fair. This event was held in the Ohio Union to accommodate all the various graduate students from all across campus. Like many of the events we’ve had thus far, orientation to trainings, the morning started with a mingling session (I’ve been meeting new people non-stop!) and of course….breakfast. There were many students coming together from all different types of graduate programs. They mentioned there are about 10,000+ graduate students this year.

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(Enjoying the sunshine in the Fisher Courtyard while reviewing all the information from the fair.)

The Welcome Event included a few different speakers like President Drake and Bruce McPherson, the Executive Vice President and Provost, who gave us all a warm welcome into graduate life. A speaker who really resonated with me was Todd Gibbs, Wellness Coaching Program Manager and Doctoral Candidate in Counselor Education. His talk touched on his own graduate school experience and the work he is doing for his doctorate. He talked about “imaging ourselves thriving” through the graduate school program. I really liked this idea. With the uncertainty in starting something new, it is normal to be unsure of why and how I am where I am. There seems to be some fear of the unknown but also excitement knowing that there are wonderful things ahead. I hope that keeping a positive attitude and envisioning myself thriving will help me push through any challenges that might come my way. I am thankful to be where I am today, though there are a few nerves. The idea of “transitions” or “starting a new journey” has been a recurring theme throughout these first few days. I am excited to continue to stay curious and take advantage every opportunity that comes my way!

Go Bucks,

Nikki Villoria

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(Buckeyes checking out all the resources and organizations to get involved in as graduate students.)

 

A Quick Recap

It has been quite a year and time has passed so quickly.  I recently got back in town after experiencing an amazing summer internship with Frito-Lay.  I wanted to recap where I was coming from to help me organize my thoughts for the next adventure coming this year!

I asked my daughter, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”  She answered, “Bigger”.  I responded, “Me too!”  She wanted to be taller and I wanted to grow more more professionally! The spring semester helped me achieve that goal, but was very different from the first semester in that it was more like waves of intense work and then a week with much less work.  Data Analysis, Staffing, Teams & Leadership, and Employment Law.  The ‘Data Analysis’ class helped me to understand business empirically and provided a practical exploration of excel.  The ‘Staffing’ class gave me a comprehensive knowledge of the staffing process to complement my job as a staffing coordinator.  The ‘Teams and Leadership’ class explored dynamics of organizations.  ‘Employment Law’ was a comprehensive introduction  into employment law.  By the end of the semester, and the end of the first year, I had received a thorough preparation for my internship with Frito-Lay.

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The Journey Begins

13958000_10154366799382777_3267127209711401170_oI am 37 years old and back in college! It’s a new chapter of my life– maybe a new “book”– that I never would have imagined when I graduated in May of 2000 with my degree in journalism from the University of Missouri. One week after moving to Columbus and preparing for the semester to begin, I’m still having those “pinch me” moments. On rare occasions, they’re moments filled with anxiety. But the comforting reality is that most of these moments are filled with excitement, hope, and a sense of great opportunity ahead. I am truly ready for this.

Although classes haven’t begun yet, the staff at Fisher has already held a two-night orientation and a “career foundations seminar.” The latter event was amazing. There were several high-level panelists from major companies (we’re talking BIG people, i.e. the VP of HR for Frito-Lay/Pepsi, HR Manager of U.S. Global Functions for Shell, HR Operations Manager for Rolls-Royce and more) who offered great insight into the field and what we should consider as we begin (or continue) this professional path. We also were given the opportunity to mingle quite a bit with the panelists and we heard from second-year MHRM students. These companies want to talk to US about internships and entry-level positions; they want the best students from the best HR management programs. And that’s why they come to OSU. (Side note: the cohort is diverse and I particularly noted the large number of international students. Yesterday, I befriended two students from India. If many people are traveling half-way across the world to join the MHRM program, it’s a good sign!)

Today, I met with Jill Westerfeld, the Assistant Director of Career Management and the MHRM “career adviser.” She helped organize the seminar earlier this week and gives lots of feedback and guidance to students. She also develops relationships with recruiters and others from various organizations. She’s super-helpful and knowledgeable– and intense in a really good way. She has a very driven spirit about her– the kind you want in someone trying to help you get a job! If you have vague memories of a mediocre career services office during your undergrad time, Jill and her colleagues are NOT that. They offer customized attention and assistance, although Jill stresses that she does not place people; she helps. And she expects the student to do all the hard work– research, networking, academic performance– to better ensure career success.

Thinking about Jill and all of my interactions thus far at Fisher, I’m very impressed and very comforted as I get ready for class next week. I feel like I have a support network and will have everything at my disposal to make the most of my time at OSU.