Are You Ready To Master Your Future?

While the authors of the Fisher Grad Life belong to different programs and speak to their own experiences, one similarity we share is having gone through the process of selecting a masters program. Pursuing this type of degree is a big investment and the key to finding the right program lies in conducting thorough research.Image result for masters program

This week I decided to share what factors I found helpful when I began to consider business graduate programs.

Disclaimer: This is not a comprehensive list, but rather a short list of items that will push you in the right direction for your search.

Location

Are you willing to relocate?  I would determine this as soon as possible, doing so will either narrow or expand your search for prospective programs. Depending on where you are currently located, expanding your Image result for locationsearch may allow you to consider more competitive programs. However, do not consume your time searching for or applying to universities in locations you would not actually relocate to if accepted.

Program Length

The average length of a masters program is typically two years. However, you will find that some programs can be shorter or longer based on the specialty you are interested in. If you wish to remain working full-time during this period, it can take anywhere from 3-6 years to complete a program as a part-time student. The duration of a program can easily be found on a program’s website.

Program Type

Not all programs are created equal. Even if they sound similar, be aware of the “College” or “School” that each program is associated with. Using Human Resources as an example, the Master of Human Resource Managment Program at Ohio State is in the Fisher College of Business but many other universities have their HR programs within a School of Industrial and Labor Relations. Navigate to the university’s website and reference the curriculum to get a better sense of what type of coursework each program focuses on.

Related imageRequirements

Each university will differ in this category. Majority of programs will have you submit a resume, letters of recommendation, transcripts, essay, and test scores. Some programs may waive or not require you to take the GMAT or GRE while other programs could require prior work experience in order to be admitted.

Cost

To estimate the cost of attendance, I suggest searching for the tuition and fees and the cost of living on the universities website. In addition to this, you may want to consider if the university is a private or public institution, if you would be paying in or out of state tuition as well as what type of financial assistance is available.

Financial Assistance

Compared to undergraduate studies, FASFA or federal student aid is much more limited for graduate students. Therefore, a majority of students will fund their education Image result for costwith student loans. I suggest speaking with a representative of the program about opportunities for scholarships, graduate assistantship, and fellowships that you may be eligible for.

Other

To conclude, I suggest looking into each university’s accreditation, reputation, ranking, faculty, campus life, student resources/involvement opportunities and career outcomes of past graduates. Most importantly, search for programs that align with your short and long-term career goals.

No matter where you are in this process, I encourage you to utilize the information highlighted in this post and begin your graduate program search today. If you are interested in any of the Fisher College of Business graduate programs, please reach out to us at any time!

Career Fair Realness

With the Fisher Career and Internship Fair behind me, I’ve finally taken the time to reflect on the experience. While the dust still settles, I figured I’d take a few minutes to give out Alex’s Top 3 Tips for Succeeding at the Career Fair/Interviewing Process:

Dress Confidently

Case in point: my new suit + ties + shoes = $600-$700. That’s not money that a lot of people just having lying around. I work full-time and that still took time to save up!

A lot of times, folks will tell you to “dress professionally” which means “wear a suit” or whatever your gender equivalent of a suit is. While obviously suits are a great way to go, I say dress CONFIDENTLY for two reasons:

  1. Not everybody can afford a suit.
  2. You will literally be in a sea of suits and standing out isn’t always a bad thing.

So wear something nice that works for your price range and comfort level. Personally, I was very lucky to be able to afford a new suit and pair of dress shoes for the career fair, but that may not be your story. If you end up not being able to rock a suit-like option, maybe even make a little light-hearted joke during the opening like I used to before I could afford a suit.

After you explain your genuine interest in the company (we’ll talk more about this later) finish with “and I’m REALLY excited to get this internship/job so I can afford my first suit!” Say it with a smile and they’ll probably love it.

Don’t be a robot

Unless you’re RoboCop, then for sure be a robot.

Now, joking during an interview isn’t for everybody, so you have to do what feels comfortable when talking with employers and recruiters (are you sensing a theme yet?). That being said, these folks are going to meet and interview dozens of people over the next few days, and that doesn’t even stack up to how many people they may interact with all together.

Obviously, be professional and respectful of their time, but if you sit there and just regurgitate answers that you’ve obsessed over the past week or two, they’re going to get bored or at the very least they’re not going to remember you.

When they ask about who you are,  talk about something more than just your professional passions. Do you have a pet you love? Maybe a fun hobby? I always mention at the end of my “about me” section that my main three passions in life are education, diversity and inclusion, and my dog, Bernie. This usually shows that I’m not just some mindless worker drone, but I’m an actual person who they can connect with on a personal level.

Don’t be afraid to show a little bit of who you are and you’ll be great.

And finally..

You have about five minutes at most, so be memorable

This is something nobody really told me about when I was prepping for the career fair, and is was probably the most shocking. You walk up to the booth, get noticed by a recruiter, they take your resume and maybe take a picture (you sometimes fill out a quick questionnaire on an tablet), and then you get to do an elevator pitch. Maybe they’ll ask you a follow up, maybe they just tell you about the next steps in their process…and then that’s it.

Note: Wearing a beekeeper outfit is not what I mean by “being memorable”

It’s quick, it feels slightly awkward, and I can only imagine the amount of hand shaking that goes down. It’s not the recruiter’s fault, I remember some lines being wrapped around the ball room, with undergraduates and graduates patiently waiting for their few precious minutes. I’m not knocking the system at all, but what I am saying is that you have a short amount of time to make a good impression, so you have to make it. To borrow the iconic words of a meme, you have to shoot your shot.

Introduce yourself confidentially, talk about a few key things about your experiences that you think stand out or that you’re most proud of, be upfront that you’re interested (if you are, don’t lie) and would like to know the next steps of their process. This will, hopefully, signal to them you’re the real deal and are worth their time to interview. Add in tip one and two and you’re on your way to getting a job/internship!

So there you have it, Alex’s Top 3 Tips for Succeeding at the Career Fair/Interviewing Process. I can’t guarantee your success, but I’ve found past success with these few tips. As long as you’re honest about who you are and what you what from/in an employer, you’ll be fine!

Good luck with the internship/job search and may the odds be ever in your favor!

My Journey to MHRM-hood

As a MHRM student, a question I get asked a lot is “What made you want to get into HR?” So, here we go.

I came to Ohio State as an undergraduate in Engineering. I had a rough couple semesters when I realized thatengineering was not for me. So I started looking into the business school, and once I finished my general courses I had to choose my specializations. My choices? Operations Management or HR.

I picked Operations Management.

And I don’t regret that one bit. It led me to the teachers who helped me realize that I wanted more. It gave me a very solid background in the inner working of an organization. I learned about efficiency, lean principles, maximizing flow through a production line, and continuous improvement. I learned so much about operations, and I really enjoyed it. But somewhere during the program, I also realized that an organization can churn out production and services at its highest efficiency, but without people, they wouldn’t be able to do any of that. People are the heart of your organization.

Me upon graduation in 2017 in front of Gerlach Hall, my home for the next two years (one left, now!)

Studying Human Resources has opened my eyes to a whole new side of organizations. HR isn’t just firing people, and we’re more than the “people employees go to if there’s a problem.” Yes, those fall under our descriptions, but as the workplace is changing, our role is becoming more strategic.

Expectations for HR professionals are leading towards knowing how to analyze and interpret data, how to lead change in the workplace, and how to combine standard business practices with HR metrics to help lead the organization to their goals. To do that well, we must know about our departments, our business, our customers, our C-Suite leaders, our culture, and our vision.

My professor, John Shaffner, once told us that “as an HR partner, you will be expected to know everyone else’s business while such a consideration will not be extended to you.” And maybe that’s the case. But I didn’t go into HR to be cared about: I went into HR to care about people—more specifically, our employees and future employees.

I love the path my education has taken me on. However, I was able to combine both facets of my education into the best profession I could ever want. But no path is the same and no story is the same. Maybe you even have your own story to share. But if you’re thinking about HR, or wondering even what a “MHRM” is, ask me, ask anyone in the program. Because maybe it could help you with your own journey.

Career Fair 101

It’s the beginning of the autumn semester here at the Fisher College of Business and that means recruiting season for both undergraduate and graduate students is underway. For many, this is an opportunity to land an internship or full-time position and there is no better way to get your foot in the door with employers than to utilize the networking events and career fairs happening on campus. As a student currently going through the recruiting process, I understand that preparing for a career fair can seem like a daunting task and it may be difficult to know where to start.
Image result for michael scott and i knew exactly what to do

Whether you are a potential or current student at Ohio State or a student attending another university here are my pro tips to help you successfully tackle any Career Fair.

Research, Research, Research

Find a list of employers that will be attending the career fair through your university’s handshake (or similar platform) so that you can identify the companies you are interested in. Next research each company’s website, job positions, recent news, and company culture. This will come in handy when you speak with employers about their organization as well as help identify if the company may be a good fit for you. Trust me, companies will recognize pretty quickly if you decide to skip this step.

Extra Pro Tip: If you really want to impress employers, be proactive and apply to these companies prior to attending. It will show them you are prepared and they will take you more seriously as a prospective candidate.

Prep Your Resume

Although I would recommend to always have your resume updated, I especially encourage you to prep it weeks prior to the career fair. This will allow you to have your resume critiqued by your Career Management Office and implement the feedback given to you in a timely manner. Schedule this appointment in advance because this timeframe is typically when the offices are busiest and timeslots will fill up fast.Image result for resume preparation It may seem like everything is electronic these days, but be prepared and bring a handful of paper copies with you to the career fair just in case. If you want to add a special touch, go to the nearest print shop and make these copies on resume paper for about 20 cents a sheet.

Dress for Success

A career fairs dress code is almost always business professional so plan your outfit accordingly and pick out what you are going to wear the day before to avoid unwanted stress the day of. There may be individuals assigned to monitor the dress code so take this seriously. If you are unsure what business professional is, check out this article for reference. 

Practice Your Impression

Did you know that a first impression is made within the first seven seconds of meeting someone? No pressure right? The best way to take the nerves away from this is to simply practice. This can be done with friends, family, or peers until you feel confident enough to approach employers. Practice introducing yourself and what you are going to say. This is introduction is often considered your “pitch“, which should be between 30-60 seconds. When doing this don’t forget to practice approaching employers with a smile and a firm handshake.

Image result for bee yourself

Be Yourself

The last and most important thing that you can do to be successful is to be yourself. This is not only true when talking with employers but anything you pursue in life. This journey is too short to not be who you are and ultimately you want to end up at a company where you feel comfortable with the individuals and the environment around you.

While these tips may seem small in nature if you put in the effort to complete them it can have a big impact on whether or not you have a successful career fair experience. Although the Fisher Fall Career Fair has already occurred, there are still a number of networking events and career fairs happening on campus throughout the 2018-2019 school year. Thank you for reading and I hope you find these tips useful in your future endeavors.

First Impressions, First Challenges, First Action Steps

Hello there! My name is Mai Erana Salmeron and I am a first-year MHRM student at Fisher College of Business. I want to start by telling you about my background, especially how and why I am here today. Then I would love to share, as my title expresses, the first impressions, challenges, and action steps I am embracing as I start my year as a graduate student at Fisher.

A little bit about me

I was born in Mexico City, but moved to Chile shortly after, then to Venezuela, back to Mexico City, and finally to Ohio! My family has been in Columbus for some time now; I actually went to high school around here. I left for undergrad in Boston and came back for graduate school. (Fun fact: I moved to Columbus for the very first time on July 6th, and on that date exactly seven years later, I moved back permanently for grad school. Meant to be? I think so!)

I have an undergrad degree in hospitality administration, which is a result of my love for taking care of others, and the tremendous impact gathering people around the table served to help me adapt to various cultures growing up. Most of my work experience has been in the Food and Beverage industry, but it’s through those opportunities that I recognized a tremendous need for employee development and talent management. I had some great “lightbulb moments” as I like to call them that made me realize how much I like human resources and how this had to be the next step in my career.

Graduation from Boston University
Some of my work at a local golf club in Columbus

So why OSU? I think it took me to get out of Columbus to realize how much I love it! There is nothing more welcoming than this beautiful, vibrant city with a great balance of city and suburban life. There is so much to do, so many places to eat at, and so much community involvement to experience. Being part of this city means you are a Buckeye in some way or another, so I truly looked forward to moving back and being a part of it all again. Fisher is an even more exciting part of this decision. As I looked for HR programs, I couldn’t find anything that compared! The school has phenomenal rankings, opportunities, and most importantly, people who demonstrated they wanted to invest in me as much as I wanted to invest in them.

Columbus heads into the fall:)
Ohio High School D1 Golf State Championship at OSU Gray
Columbus Zoo lights!

First impressions

If I had to describe how Fisher makes me feel after the first few weeks of classes I would use the words capable and dynamic. Even before we got to campus, the staff and faculty were engaging with the students. We had prep modules, books, and other interactive plans that helped me become a part of the culture at Fisher; these also allowed me to see that I have what it takes to succeed in this career. I am unbelievably grateful for all the ways in which Fisher guides its students to take small, yet meaningful steps to prepare for class, career fairs, networking opportunities, and most importantly learn about yourself. There is never a dull moment at this school; there is always some organization providing involvement opportunities, or a chance to connect with the staff, alumni, and professors.

First challenges

Being told all the steps involved in becoming a competitive business student is terrifying, and quite frankly, you can feel overwhelmed. So far, I have had to learn to pause and think of all the things that I have done, career wise, and ask myself why they mean something to me. I have learned that it is invaluable to be patient with myself to process all these expectations, so I can figure out what to work on that will truly help me grow. I have had to get out of my comfort zone and just jump in, as I learn to solve problems whenever they arise. It’s a bit uncomfortable, but it has also been truly rewarding.

First action steps

These are a few pieces of advice I have heard in my time at Fisher thus far. I would encourage you to keep them in mind because they can help you be very successful and enjoy the program to the fullest. I also think they are helping me stay accountable and motivated🙂

  • Be present
  • Prepare
  • Be a life-time learner
  • Take on leadership fearlessly
  • Be kind to yourself

It is like an Amusement Park…

Since this is my first blog post, it’s probably best that I do a quick little introduction. I do these all the time with the students I work with, and I assure you that they love it (they actually hate it), because everybody loves icebreakers (everybody hates icebreakers).

Alex BroshiousMy names Alex Broshious and I’m a part-time student in the Master of Human Resource Management program in The Ohio State University‘s Fisher College of Business (did you get all that? there’s going to be a quiz at the end). I currently work full-time at Ohio State as a Hall Director and have a undergraduate degree in Education from Capital University and a Master’s in Education from Miami University. This is my second year in the MHRM program and I’m currently in the internship search for Summer 2019 with an expected graduation date in 2020 (nothing expected about it, it’s happening).

My cute dog, Bernie!

I also have a mini dachshund puppy named Bernie and he’s perfect, his Instagram is @livinglikebernie if you want to follow his adorable life.

Now, icebreaker out of the way, I wanted to dedicate my first official post to talking a little bit about the roller coaster of an experience graduate school is and compare it to, well, a roller coaster.

Over Labor Day weekend, I won two free tickets to Cedar Point, one of the largest amusement parks in the world conveniently located in Sandusky, Ohio. I grew up in the Sandusky area, but I hadn’t been to Cedar Point for about 10 years, so I pretty hyped to experience all the new rides and relive my childhood memories of The Iron Dragon and overpriced amusement park food. At the early hour of 7 a.m., my friend, Michael, and I got into a car and made the two-hour drive to Cedar Point.

Cedar Point was mostly how I remembered it. The layout was burned into my memory after multiple childhood summers spent running through the park (fun fact: I was so hyped about Cedar Point as a toddler that my mom had to put me in one of those kid leashes to keep me from running through Camp Snoopy with reckless abandon), but there were multiple new rides and buildings that threw me off my game. The park was reasonably packed, so we only got through about five roller coasters before we called it a day due to one roller coaster breaking down twice while we were in line (looking at you, Maverick), but I’d say we got our money’s worth.

The most jarring experience came when, about halfway through the second roller coaster, I had a wave of motion sickness hit me. It was a feeling I’d never had before at Cedar Point, or at least something so far back in my memory that I’d forgotten all about it. After that first hit of motion sickness, the rest of the day was a onslaught of metaphorical (and quite literal) highs and lows. While I was living for the experience of feeling like a kid again as we climbed the first hill of roller coasters I’d never experienced before, I was also dying a little bit inside due to the new feelings of motion sickness. Cedar Point was familiar, but also completely new and a tad scary.

So, why admit that I’m no longer the ride warrior (that’s what they call people who are all about the roller coaster life) I was when I was 16? What does that have to do with my MHRM experience?

Well, I think the feelings of familiarity and concern that I felt during my time at Cedar Point are similar to my experience in MHRM. Graduate programs, no matter where you go or what you decide to study, are always going to be somewhat familiar and somewhat scary. You understand the structure, you go to class, do papers, sometimes you do exams, but it has this different feel that really hits you in the pit of your stomach. For some, this feeling causes extra stress they didn’t know was possible, and for others it spurs you to do the best work of your life. Sometimes you’re cheering as you come to a stop after a big final that you just crushed, and sometimes you’re holding on for dear life as you fly around a corner.

Much like Cedar Point, I’ve loved my experience with MHRM so far, even if I still get that feeling in the pit of my stomach at least once a month. You’ll hit your highest highs and maybe even some of your lowest lows, but when you look back on what you accomplished, just like how you look up at a roller coaster and can’t believe you really went that high, you’ll feel this sense of pride and amazement at what you’re able to do.

Oh, and the food’s much better here at OSU.

Getting Oriented

Meeting new people can be intimidating. Even for folks who have committed their careers to working directly with people every day as Human Resource professionals.

So how do you help 40+ strangers get acquainted with each other and become comfortable working together?

You bus them out to the woods and facilitate as they solve a series of challenges and push themselves out of their comfort zones. That’s right…

My group rocking our safety gear!

We did a ROPES COURSE!!

Disclaimer: I am a huge fan of a good ropes courses. I was part of a scholarship program in undergrad and we did one every year to welcome in the new scholarship recipients while reestablishing communication and teamwork amongst the older members. It was something I looked forward to every year!

Shannon Hynes and I REALLY                 leaning into the challenge!

 

Likewise, this time around with Fisher did not disappoint. Not only did the ropes course help us get to know a few things about each other (from our names to a sneak peek at our leadership styles), it also gave us the chance to begin creating bonds based on a shared experience that was both mentality and physically challenging. 

We also had the opportunity to debrief with the course facilitators to gain their “behind the scenes” perspective on the course and how it can be utilized to mitigate some of the difficult issues that arise in a workplace environment. From an HR perspective, it was exciting to see how something as unconventional as a ropes course could be the key to solving problems such as a lack of effective communication and conflict within a team.

I won’t spoil the all of the lessons for you should you end up completing a course yourself, but I will say that I left this experience with an even greater respect for—and trust in—my MHRM cohort.

It also reminded me how important it is to accept assistance from each other, be vulnerable, and lean into feeling uncomfortable at times. We are in this together and I can not wait to see what the future holds!

 

My Grad Life: The Intro

Welcome to the Fisher Grad Life Blog!

My name is Elise Zawacki, and over the next two years, I will be sharing my experience in the Masters of Human Resource Management program here at the Fisher College of Business. To better understand the content I will be writing about, here are a few things to know about me. I lived in the state of Michigan for the past 22 years of my life and recently graduated from Central Michigan University where I studied Human Resource Management with a minor in Information Systems. During this time, I also was a part of various student organizations and found a passion for volunteerism and professional development. Although it may be to my family and friends dismay, I couldn’t be happier that I get to call myself a Buckeye.

May 2018 Graduate

Outside of my academics, I enjoy a number of hobbies during my free time. A few of these include:

Traveling Everywhere & Anywhere

Paris, France

Most recently, I took a post-graduation trip throughout Europe where I visited Amsterdam, London, Paris, Florence, and Rome. A future goal of mine is to visit every continent in the world (Yes, even Antarctica).

Reading

I don’t have a particular topic or subject that I specifically focus on, but lately, I have been picking up any New York Times Best Seller I stumble upon at Barnes & Noble. My long-time favorite author is John Green, and I fully blame him for the reason I am obsessed with life and love quotes.

Food & Drink Exploration

Fox in the Snow Cafe
Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream

I am a foodie, so this particular hobby is the one I practice most often. Being in a new city makes it fun and easy to do. My pro tip for exploring new places is to use Yelp—it has yet to let me down! Pictured above are two places I most recently checked out, Fox in the Snow Cafe and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, they are absolutely worth a trip. This topic will more than likely consume another one of my blog posts so stay tuned!

Concert Enthusiast  

Lollapoolza – Chicago, IL

Although I don’t have the time or money to do this as frequently as I would like, I have managed to attend over 25 concerts in my lifetime. Whether it is country, hip hop, alternative, or electronic music I enjoy it all. Something I have already come to love about Columbus is that there is no shortage of concerts, music venues, and live bands to go to around the city.

Thank you for reading my introductory blog post, and I hope that you stick with me as I continue to write about my graduate school journey.

The days are long…

…but the years are short.

This is my last day in my second home Gerlach Hall. To be candid, I’ve been avoiding this blog post for weeks now. I sat down to write on multiple occasions only to be overcome with such nostalgia that I couldn’t ever actually begin writing.

The last two years have absolutely changed my life. I’ve learned more about the field of HR in terms of technical knowledge than I knew existed. What’s more, I’ve learned more about myself than I ever could have anticipated.

I know I’ve talked about this point for some time now, but to be explicit: I believe grad school is about so much more than classes, exams, and projects. Grad school is about pushing yourself to think in different ways. It’s about confronting the anxiety of presenting in front of 50 people. It’s about managing through the hurt of not getting that internship you thought you’d nail. It’s about sleepless nights, and not having the right answer all the time, and learning to dance in the grey area. It’s about learning to fight fair with your classmates and professors and respecting each other at the end of the day. It’s about failing small, learning from your mistakes, and remembering how to be a beginner again.

It’s about all this and so much more. But I wanted to challenge myself to choose my most meaningful learnings from my time in the Master of Human Resource Management program. Here’s my triple-distilled final list of takeaways:

Don’t sweat the small stuff. The business world is fast-moving and always changing. People move quickly and shake things up and make mistakes. Grad school has taught me that doing something is almost always better than doing nothing. Don’t know the answer? Give it a shot anyway. Don’t know how to start that paper? Just start. One of my classmates has often said: “you either succeed or you learn.” Grad school is about learning how to use your energy and effort in the direction of productivity.

Take care of yourself. What recharges you? Do that thing, and do it often. This year, even when I thought I’d run out of hours in the day, I made time to exercise–for just one hour. I knew I’d be able to think more clearly afterward. Everything that needs to get done will get done.

You get out what you put in. As I move through life, I realize that in nearly every organization, team, program, and job there are going to be two groups of people–1) those who put in discretionary effort, and 2) those who do the bare minimum. On paper, these two groups will look virtually the same. They’ll have the same credentials, degrees, and experiences, and positions, and they’ll probably have access to the same opportunities as a result. The difference is in the amount of time and care they have invested into each of these items on their resume. Did they do it to check a box or did they do it for the challenge, learning, and growth? I can tell you with confidence that merely checking boxes will catch up with those folks, so choose wisely which group you want to belong to.

How you do anything is how you do everything. Don’t wait to put your best foot forward. I run across people every day who are so engrossed in the next “thing,” and admittedly I am also guilty of such future-tripping. It was said best by MHRM class of 2017 graduate (and my good friend) Kacielife happens now. It is so easy to get caught up saying, when I nail that internship, get that job, graduate this program, get married, have a family, that is when my life will start. Try to remember your life is happening every day and all around yoube present for it.

To all my followers over the last two years, thank you for the honor. Best of luck in wherever your future endeavors take you! And to all my graduating classmateslet’s do this.

As We Go on, We’ll Remember…

As my MHRM journey comes to a close, I’ve found myself spending a lot of time in my head reflecting over what the the last two years have meant for me. But because you only ever hear from me, I wanted to give a voice to some of my classmates. Below, graduating MHRM students share some of their fondest memories in the MHRM program.

My favorite part of the program is the family I’ve created within Fisher. Being surrounded by students and faculty who are passionate about HR like I am have made me even more excited to start my career. Grad school can be intense, but I’ve had so much fun attending events like grad school prom, Fisher Follies events, Varsity Club outings after class, intramurals, and football games. The people are what I’m going to miss most! I can’t wait to see the success my classmates achieve and to continue to share ideas as the field of HR changes.

– Kelly Mayer

Fisher Follies Fall Auction 2017 (Kelly is on the right)

My favorite part was really day one. Sounds super cheesy, but being separated and away from Georgia for the first time ever was a daring (and scary) adventure. I just remember doing the scavenger hunt during orientation and meeting a lot of excited, eager people. That really brought to light that Ohio would be home for two years or more and I was ready.

– Chase Lakhani

Chase rushing the field after an OSU win

I will never forget winning the HR External Case Competition (Jen was on my team). I was so tired and so proud of our recommendation and presentation. It was really rewarding to win and be recognized for our hard work.

Also, on a lighter note, I really loved how good we were at potlucking. I don’t know if that’s an HR quirk or if we are all just awesome. We could have a potluck for anything and we always came through, it was so fun.

– Kate Clausen

MHRMsgiving = Thanksgiving for MHRMs

My most memorable day was when I realized that I had been accepted among all the domestic students here. It was the last day of Professor Shepherd’s class and we had a potluck. I had a chance to bring in an authentic Indian food. I was reluctant as I didn’t know if everyone would like Indian food, but then  I received a lot of appreciation from all of my classmates. I was overwhelmed with the amount of love and support everyone has shown. Be it group projects or team meetings, I have always been treated well.

– Divya Selvaraj

MHRMs celebrating Utsav together at the Fisher College of Business (Divya is on the left/second “row”)

Grad school can be really hard and life-consuming, especially when you are at a business school. We are consumed with cases, strategy, ROI, and all kinds of other things that many people don’t ever think about. The “business school bubble” is what I call it. Tell any average person outside the school what you obsess over in your studies and they just look at you with wide-eyed confusion. So with that in mind, one of my favorite grad school memories is the Fisher Follies Variety Show. At the end of the spring semester, we have a chance to pop our self-made bubble and make some fun of it. It’s always entertaining to step back are realize how ridiculous our business cocoon can be, and to have fun and laugh about it. Each year I attended, I was entertained and delighted by the level of craftsmanship and wit in each of the short videos. And in those moments, I realized how amazing our Fisher community is.

– Chris Schoo

MHRMs Chris and Billy Dunn posed for a partner headshot after class.

One of my favorite memories will always be winning Internal Case Comp my second year. I still can’t believe how much better Case Comp felt after a year in the program; just a real testament to how valuable the Fisher experience was for building my business acumen and professional presentation style.

Having the Varsity Club Thursday night tradition really was a special part of business school for me, too. Knowing you’d always have some time each week to catch-up, decompress, and just have fun. This is my second master’s, and my cohort never had anything like that in my first grad school experience. I’ll always have a special place in my heart for “the VC.”

– Billy Dunn

Team OSU after the 2018 HR Invitational Case Competition

When I think about my favorite memory from my time here, I wouldn’t say it’s a particular event. Rather, I think I would say it’s the overall closeness of our class with students at a wide variety of stages in their own lives– ranging from fresh out of undergrad to a recent grandfather or from being local to moving across the country and the world. Witnessing the relationships that have formed and the lifelong friendships that have developed is what I will truly value and remember for the rest of my life.

– Matt Shaffer

“MHRMs” doing the iconic O-H-I-O at Frito-Lay headquarters in Dallas at the start of their summer internship