Posts filed under 'Career Stuff'

Things to Consider When Considering the Fisher MHRM Program

Thinking Monkey

I received my acceptance letter to the MHRM program about a year ago. So I thought I would share some of the things I considered when making my decision to apply to the Fisher MHRM program and also accept my admission.

•At the time of my acceptance I was working full-time, and I appreciated that the courses were designed for the working professional. Classes are scheduled Monday-Thursday 6:00-9:15pm, so they compliment the working professional’s work schedule very well. Most students in the program utilize this flexibility because most work in some capacity, whether part-time or full-time. For those thinking classes seem late, don’t worry. It may take some time, but your body adjusts.

•I really appreciated the program’s Core Human Resource Skills curriculum that provides a generalist’s perspective, as well as the Business Context curriculum. I think being able to speak the language of business is critical to being a strategic partner. Effective Human Resource professionals must be able to explain how Human Resources impacts the bottom line and contributes to the organization, and the program is well-designed in providing a breadth of knowledge so that individuals acquire business acumen and exposure to different areas within the field of Human Resources. In addition, I liked that the program required either a thesis or internship experience (majority of students select the internship) during the summer between their first and second year in the program. This allows students to apply and connect what they learned in the classroom to practical experience.

•The active and supportive Office of Career Management (OCM) was also something that distinguished Fisher’s MHRM program. They provide ongoing counseling, support and preparation. More importantly though, they sincerely care about each individual they work with. The OCM goes out of their way to ensure students feel ready and confident to secure and pursue internships and jobs. It was also comforting to know that the internship placement was 100% and the job placement was 93%.

• I was also impressed by the faculty and their areas of expertise. Fisher has a great mix of faculty who primarily have experience in academia, and others who have more experience in the corporate world. Again though, similar to OCM, the faculty are incredibly passionate about the field of Human Resources and take an interest in their students as individuals. Many of them are more than happy to meet with students outside of office hours to serve as mentors or advisers. Additionally, because the class size is typically around 50 students, this allows for more discussion during class and more individualized attention.

•I also liked that the program is diverse. Students come from different previous fields of study, different work experiences and years of prior work experience, and some work full-time while pursuing the program while others work part-time or not at all. Furthermore, there is a strong presence of international students in the program who add a lot of value to the program and class discussions.

•Lastly, location, location, location. I was born and raised in Northeast, Ohio. However, Columbus is something completely different than any other part of Ohio. It is such a thriving city with so much to do and see. There are several small communities/areas within Columbus that all have their own unique cultures and characteristics, which I absolutely love!


Day at K

Every week, Fisher hosts companies interested in recruiting MBA candidates for internships and full-time positions. Though attendance is never mandatory, it is not uncommon for student’s schedules to become completely filled with all the company visits and information sessions going on. And not just because of the promise of pizza or Panera (which admittedly does go a long way to attracting more attendees). It is always interesting to hear from different companies, often competitors, and learn about their unique approaches to the problems we discuss on a daily basis in our classes. But even better than attending these info sessions on campus is when we get invited to visit the companies on their own turfs.

On January 16th, Kellogg’s invited several first year MBA students interested in brand management to their headquarters in Battle Creek, MI, for their annual Day at K event. We were greeted by several current brand managers (including a recent Fisher graduate) and were led through Kellogg’s welcoming and history-filled entrance: dioramas worthy of placement in a museum; a miniature simulated grocery store displaying a current marketing campaign; artwork depicting a century’s worth of product and advertising innovation. It was truly an impressive introduction.

5:30 AM departure for a 4 hour drive. Worth it!

5:30 AM departure for a 4 hour drive. Worth it!

We were brought to a small conference room where we joined and socialized with more members of Kellogg’s marketing department, as well as several MBA students from the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan (sidebar – this was 5 days after Ohio State won the national championship, so being with a bunch of Michigan students was particularly gratifying – end sidebar).  Several Kellogg’s presenters then spoke to us about marketing subjects ranging from Kellogg’s unique approach to marketing to challenges facing the company to relationships with their customers, retailers, suppliers, and agencies. A small panel of assistant brand managers allowed us to ask about working at Kellogg’s, projects they had personally completed, career trajectories, and overall satisfaction of their time with Kellogg’s. Hearing from such key personnel from a global powerhouse of a brand and getting a chance to ask them anything and everything marketing related was an incredible opportunity.

Tony the Tiger made an appearance.

Tony the Tiger made an appearance.

The Day at K was an absolutely wonderful event. It was a real treat (Rice-Krispy Treat, to be specific) to get to meet such talented brand and marketing experts and visit the headquarters of such a hallowed brand. We even got to take a tour of Kellogg’s archives and see marketing materials and advertisements across the decades.  I am very thankful for Kellogg’s invitation, and for the Fisher College of Business for providing me with such exciting opportunities like this.


Switching Roles – Career Fair Style

For the past couple of years, I have always attended the career fair looking for positions and opportunities. Lately, my role has switched. After accepting a full time role with EY, I now attend career fairs and events as a Student Ambassador. This role requires me to talk with students and answer any questions they may have about an accounting career or about completing an internship.

I most recently attended a Mock Career Fair where I was the one interacting and speaking with students. Attending a career fair from the employer’s perspective is a completely different scenario. Instead of being nervous and anxious about talking with a prospective employer, you know you have to prepare yourself to evaluate students and prepare yourself to answer any questions they may have.

I imagine for most EY employees, attending a career fair or an event is no big deal. For me, I was still a little nervous and anxious as if I was actually attending a career fair looking for a job. I was nervous because I had never had this responsibility before. Collecting resumes, evaluating potential, answering questions — this seemed like a lot to handle! I was really nervous for no reason — talking to prospective students is actually a lot of fun and it is really interesting to talk to students who are genuinely excited about their future career in accounting.

After experiencing career fairs from both sides, I have a couple pieces of advice to give regarding attending career fairs and interacting with employers:

1) Know where you want to go – when you arrive at the career fair, it can be quite intimidating. Huge ballrooms filled with companies waiting for you to talk to them. It’s best to have a few companies in mind who you really want to talk to, that allows you to target a specific table or area.

2) Have a practice round – my advice is to not make your “number-one choice” the first company whose table you visit. Instead, pick another company as a warm up. This will allow you to get some nerves out and not risk messing up your chances with a company you really like.

3) Pay attention – make sure you keep up with conversation and remember what the representative’s background is. If they are in tax – don’t start asking them about audit. In this case, keep your questions more general and save the specifics for someone who can answer them better.

4) Know when to move on – career fairs are crazy busy, especially for top companies. If you have been talking to someone for awhile, make sure to leave in a timely manner. There are many other students in line and you don’t want to be known as someone who kept lingering and wasting time.

5) Follow up – if you really enjoyed the company, make sure to get contact information! This way you can email your thanks and keep up to date with opportunities when they become available.

Hopefully these help in the future job hunt! Whether you are talking to many employers or representing one company, career fairs can be very useful and interesting to attend!

 


The Internship Search Has Finally Come to a Close

As many of my classmates and friends are aware, I started my internship search back in August. It’s been a long journey, but I am very excited and could not be more pleased with my decision to accept an offer with Anheuser-Busch. Fisher’s Office of Career Management has helped me along every step of the way and I have the wonderful staff to thank for that.

AB is America's leading brewer

AB is America’s leading brewer

My experience interviewing with Anheuser-Busch was great. I first saw the company at the Fisher Fall Career Fair back in September, and was able to develop a good relationship with the recruiters through networking. I then did a first-round interview and was fortunate enough to be selected for the final panel interview in St. Louis. Because AB is headquartered in St. Louis, this was a great opportunity for me to really evaluate the organization’s culture and assess if I’d be a good fit for the company. I traveled to St. Louis in October with another one of my MHRM classmates, Natalie, who would also be interviewing on the final panel. Neither of us had been to St. Louis before, so it was a treat to explore the city and see all the different sights the day before our interview.

The morning of our interview, we arrived bright and early and met the other interview candidates from other schools across the country. I had never done a group interview before so I was not entirely sure what to expect. There were definitely some tough questions and it was interesting interviewing in a group setting with the other interview candidates right beside me, but I ultimately enjoyed the experience and found it extremely rewarding. After the interview, they took us on a tour of the headquarters and then on a brewery tour. We even got to see the Clydesdales! Overall, it was a great interview experience. Natalie and I both ended up getting offers to join AB’s People Department this summer, and we’re very excited to join the team!

Natalie and I before our brewery tour

Natalie and I before our brewery tour

Learning about the mashing process

Learning about the mashing process

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Learning about the seven-step brewing process


MHRM Internal Case Competition

I recently participated in the MHRM Internal Case Competition here at Fisher. Before going into this experience I had no idea what to expect. The competition started early Friday morning and the entire class was presented with a “real world” HR problem from the judges (The judges are current HR professionals from companies around the region). We were then assigned break-out rooms with our group, and given 24 hours to come up with a solution and form a presentation for the judges for the following day.

I was on a team of all first-years and none of us had any previous HR work experience. My team worked really well together, though, because we were able to communicate effectively and collaborate as a group. Once we got to our break-out rooms, we spent a lot of time brainstorming ideas, organizing our thoughts, and figuring out which ideas we wanted to focus on. If I could give one piece of advice, it would be to focus in great detail on a few of your ideas or solutions, but don’t try to tackle everything. There’s simply not enough time to address everything. My group ended up staying at school pretty late into the evening (or should I say, morning) because we had so much content to fit into our short, 15-minute presentation.

We arrived back at school early Saturday morning to finish up printing our materials and slides, but actually ended up cutting it so close that we didn’t have any time to practice our presentation before we went in to present to the judges. Our presentation went really well, though, for having not ever rehearsed, and in fact, one of our group members, Erin, won an award for best speaker overall. Looking back on this experience, I am really proud of my group for jumping in with no expectations and working really hard to produce an overall great presentation. It was definitely a memorable two days and I look forward next year’s competition.

My awesome case competition team

My awesome case competition team                                (Brennan, Chip, Erin, Me)

 


NYC Financial Services Trip

At the end of October, Nancy Gilbertsen, a director in the Office of Career Management at Fisher, organized a trip to New York City with the purpose of connecting Fisher graduate and undergraduate students with professionals and Ohio State alumni working in financial services such as investment banking and asset management. Around twenty Buckeyes took advantage of this opportunity, with ten of those students coming from the graduate programs at Fisher.

group

We started our trip with a tour of Bloomberg, which impressed all of us. In its main lobby, Bloomberg offers its employees and guests an all-you-can-eat and all-you-can-drink meal service free of charge.  Throughout our time at Bloomberg, we saw Bloomberg TV and radio studios, meeting rooms, and offices.  In the middle of our tour, Michael Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg and the past mayor of New York City, strolled right by our group – a very cool experience!  After Bloomberg, UBS hosted our group at its offices, where Steve Pierson, UBS’s Co-Head of the Financial Institutions Group, presented at Q&A sessions with topics ranging from current trends in the market to the differences between bulge bracket and boutique investment banks.  Upon conclusion of this presentation, we interacted with several UBS professionals in their Global Healthcare Group, all of whom were incredibly engaging and helpful in answering our many questions.

That night, we had dinner as a group at Nha Trang, a Vietnamese restaurant in Chinatown. We went through a countless variety of delicious Vietnamese dishes, all pre-selected favorites of Professor Dan Oglevee, who was a regular at Nha Trang during his career on Wall Street.

Nha Trang

On day two of our trip, we began with a tour of the New York office of KeyBanc Capital Markets, where we received a tour of the trading floor and presentations from a senior bankers in Key’s Debt Capital Markets group. Next, we travelled through Grand Central Station on the way to visit the New York Offices of Goldman Sachs, which are right across the street from the Freedom Tower, the tallest building in North America.

grand central

freedom tower

At Goldman Sachs, we participated in Q&A sessions with wonderful, professional, and friendly Ohio State alumni ranging from junior bankers to Jim McNamara, the Global Head of Asset Management, Third Party Distribution. Afterwards, we visited Sagent Advisors, where we met with Marty Murrer, a proud Ohio State alum, managing director, and co-founder of the firm.  Mr. Murrer walked us through his career, gave us interview and career advice, and answered our wide array of questions.  Our fourth stop that day was at the New York Offices of the Australian-based firm, Macquarie, where we had a Q&A session with Timothy Gallagher, a managing director at the firm and another proud Ohio State alum.  We concluded this very long day with a networking dinner with over forty Ohio State alumni working in financial services at Da Noi, a wonderful Italian restaurant which reserved the entire back section of the restaurant for our event.

On our final day of the trip, we began our day at one of Professor Oglevee’s breakfast spots, the Majestic Delicatessen, where we enjoyed enormous bacon, egg, and cheese bagels. After we had sufficiently raised our cholesterol levels, we visited Barclay’s beautiful offices in Times Square.  There we met with several Ohio State alumni, including Elizabeth Mily, a managing director in the Healthcare Division.  These Barclays professionals were very generous in providing advice and insight to members of our group aspiring to work on Wall Street. We concluded our trip with a visit to ING’s New York offices, where we received presentations from seven professionals from throughout the firm and a tour of the trading floor.

barclays

It was a jam-packed three day trip to the Big Apple, and I highly recommend this trip to every Fisher student seeking a career in finance. The lessons that we learned from hearing these men and women’s different career paths and the advice that we received are invaluable.  My interactions with these professionals provided some of the most helpful preparation for my investment banking interviews.  In my opinion, Fisher’s Office of Career Management is second-to-none for reasons like this NYC Financial Services trip.  As a Fisher graduate student, you have access to some of the best career advisors in the country, who will stop at nothing to help you make the most of the Ohio State alumni network of over half a million people.  Take advantage of this resource – I’m sure glad that I did!


Hook Me Up With a Job

Don’t think you’re going to show up to business school and they’re just going to hand you a job. Unfortunately that isn’t the way it works, but Fisher has done an amazing job of providing you with the tools you need to help you attain your dream career.

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As a first year MBA student I’m constantly stressing about getting an internship and learning the necessary lessons inside and outside of the class room that will propel me to my ideal job. Fisher matches you with a career consultant you can reach out to for help. This past month I’ve been meeting with my career consultant weekly and love to brag about how awesome the office of career management is.

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My career consultant Monica has worked with my resume, provided me with examples that I can use to restructure my work experience and cover letter. Prior to my first interview she scheduled a mock interview to help me answer behavioral questions and sculpt my story. I’ve expressed my interest in a few companies and she was able to put me in contact with an alumnus that could give me further insight about the company and internship opportunities.

 

This is definitely one of the most beneficial resources I utilize at Fisher!


Fisher Works for Students

As an economics undergrad with no formal finance background, Fisher College of Business’ course structure has been highly valuable to me. Fisher splits the semesters into terms, and students take five courses each term. This allows me to take many courses and broaden my finance background very quickly and comprehensively. Thus, I’ve been able to take such electives as financial modeling and international finance, and for next term, private equity, enterprise risk management, and accounting for M&A, on top of core courses.

One invaluable elective I took last term was Financial Institutions with Dr. Isil Erel. Professor Erel is an expert on banking and capital requirements, and is heavily involved in research on corporate governance and M&A. This course focused heavily on the development of the financial services industry after the deregulation of the banking industry in the 1980s or 1990s, modeling the impact of interest rate changed on banks’ balance sheets, hedging interest rate risk, modeling credit risk, accounting for off-balance sheet items, the logistics of securitization of loans, and applying capital requirements. We also discussed the root causes and impacts of the financial crisis in 2008 and the responses of the regulators. Cases for the class focused on hedging interest rate risk with swaps and analyzing exchange rate ratios for bank mergers. While the final exam was quite difficult, I am now equipped with the tools to analyze more rigorously the risks facing financial institutions.

Huntington Bank, based in Columbus, OH

Huntington Bank, based in Columbus, OH

To supplement our course, Dr. Erel invited two bank executives, Don Kimble, Chief Financial Officer of KeyCorp, and Helga Houston, Chief Risk Officer of Huntington Bank, to speak to our class. During these sessions, these executives fielded questions about all of the topics we were learning in our course and covered additional topics, such as the importance of information technology innovation in the sector and reputational risk.

KeyCorp, based in Cleveland, OH

KeyCorp, based in Cleveland, OH

Dr. Erel and Financial Institutions are just one example of how students gain from Fisher’s programs—in many other courses, professors are providing us valuable real-world skills, putting us in situations where we need to perform, and introducing us to executives and alumni who can help us in the job search. Time and time again, Fisher is working for its students.


THE INTERNSHIP Search Process

The Internship

 

 

Fisher MHRM students have the opportunity to choose between completing a thesis or an internship experience to fulfill their graduation requirement for the program. The class makeup is pretty diverse with people from a wide range of academic backgrounds and working experience, so it’s convenient that people have two different options. Nonetheless, the majority of students choose to complete an internship. Luckily, Fisher does a phenomenal job at connecting students to different opportunities for the internship and provides resources and support throughout the entire process.

Those who choose the internship option have the opportunity to begin their search from the moment they step foot on campus. Fisher and the Office of Career Management are intentional in their efforts to provide students multiple networking opportunities, informational sessions with different companies, Career Fairs, and more. Plus, they make it super easy to arrange meetings, mock interviews, and resume reviews with the Office of Career Management. MHRM students have a primary contact in the Office of Career Management, Jill Westerfeld, who meets with each student within the first couple weeks of class to discuss and explore the individual’s goals and objectives, potential industries and companies of interest, and general requirements and/or restrictions for their internship. Once this assessment is completed, she continually provides resources and support to help students find a good fit and the experience they’re looking for.

In addition to utilizing the Office of Career Management, it’s important to frequently utilize Fisher Connect to review and apply to open internships, and to utilize Fisher’s HUB to register for information sessions and Career Fairs. Not everyone knows what type of industry they’re wanting to work in for their internship during week 1, and that’s okay. The important thing is to respond with curiosity, and to learn more about different industries and companies so that you get a better feel for what would be a good fit!

Once you’ve submitted your resume through Fisher Connect and you’ve been granted an interview…prepare! Before the interview, do research on the company and practice interviewing. During the interview, dress business professional, make frequent eye contact, try to remain upbeat/positive (it’s understandable that there may be a certain degree of nervousness, but you got the interview for a reason so ‘TRY’ to remain calm and confident), listen carefully and ensure you respond to the questions being asked, utilize the STAR approach (Situation-Task-Activity-Result) when answering questions, and ask the interviewers questions about topics you genuinely want to know more about.

The internship search process is what you make of it, but there are many possibilities. You have the option to secure an internship through Fisher’s networks or to conduct an independent search, and you can decide whether you want to relocate or stay within the Columbus area. At the end of they day, it’s an opportunity for you to learn more about yourself, as well as an opportunity to learn more about what you’re looking for and what you’re not looking for.

Be proactive in learning more about what you need and want with regard to the internship experience then seek out different opportunities that are aligned. Prepare. Keep and open mind and remain positive. Lastly, don’t compare yourself to others because what may be a good fit for them, may not be a good fit for you. Both the search process AND the actual internship experience are learning opportunities though, so don’t forget that!


NSHMBA Conference in Philadelphia

Last month all MBA students were informed about the opportunity to attend diversity conferences in the fall; the university partially reimburses students for the trip costs incurred, isn’t that cool?!. The conferences we had for this year included National Black MBA Career, National Association of Women MBAs, Asian MBA Conference, Veterans MBA Conference and National Society of Hispanic MBA Conference. At first I thought that these events were intended only for those minorities, but my career advisor ensured me that it’s great opportunity to network with different employers regardless of the race and ethnicity, anybody can attend the conference. So, couple of non-Hispanic people, including me, we decided to attend National Society of Hispanic MBA Conference in Philadelphia. We went to Career Expo for two days. It was an amazing chance to talk to companies, which don’t come to the OSU campus for recruitment. Some companies conducted interviews on-site; others accepted the resumes and connected with me later. The Career Expo was a good time to practice my elevator pitch and get to know students from other business schools as well. After all, what else can you do while standing in line to speak to recruiter?! Network!

Of course, the trip to Philly wasn’t only for business, we went out in the evening and tried Philly’s famous steak, we also walked around downtown and it was amazing!!!!
Overall, this MBA conference was awesome, I networked with my target companies, I found out more information about other firms which I haven’t been considering before, I practiced my interview skills and I had fun with my friends! Definitely take the advantage of all opportunities that Fisher gives you, because the MBA experience is much more than just class assignments!
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