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In a recent session for Fisher’s Master of Business Operational Excellence class, we had the pleasure of hearing James Hereford, COO of the Palo Alto Medical foundation. While discussing lean deployment in the health-care sector, he touched on using Japanese terms for the tools and methodologies of the Toyota Production System. It’s Hereford’s preference to use the original terms. His succinct defense:
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Unlike my blog-posting colleague, I’m a relative newbie at lean, having spent my years out of college in the newspaper business and only recently making the jump to Fisher’s Center for Operational Excellence. I’ve pored over the Lean Enterprise Institute’s Lean Lexicon, scratched my head at A3s and learned very well how to nod politely at jargon as I scribble down mental notes for later. No amount of memorization, however, has taught me more about the transformative power of a lean approach than my first simulation.
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Because lean principles have their roots in automobile manufacturing, people in the service industry are prone to bristle at the thought that their organization could benefit from them. Health care is a prime example and its workers sing a common refrain: My patients aren’t cars. They are human beings.
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Picture this:  You’re a leader in an organization, perusing financial and safety reports compiled by managers tasked to boost sales, cut costs, and grow safety and quality. In one report, you see exactly the opposite happening. So what do you do? You call that manager, have him or her explain why this is happening and he or she insists: “There’s nothing to worry about. That has happened before, it was taken care of and this time it won’t be any different.” You hand out targets and a deadline and ask to stay updated. Case closed.
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When I moved to the United States from India nine years ago, an important early addition to my vocabulary was the word “silo.” In agriculture, it’s a structure used for the bulk storage of grains. Outside that trade, though, it’s used widely to describe the compartmentalization that forms inside organizations.