Regardless of where you are in your lean journey, it’s likely you’ve heard of 5S, the set of five words that serves as a methodology for organizing the workplace. In English, they’re Sort, Set in order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain. That’s derived from the Japanese origin of Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu and Shitsuke.

Detractors might say 5S is simply a “spring cleaning” activity where trash is discarded to make room for more, but it’s a great deal more than that. When you sort, you separate and eventually throw away items that are unneeded. You set in order items according to the frequency and sequence of use. You get rid of dirt, dust and any leakages and shine the workplace. Once you organize the items, you standardize their location and level of use. To sustain that organization, you create paperwork that operators or managers can use to reach that goal. 

If it all works so well, then, why do some still consider shine a dusting and cleaning activity? Some say it’s played a part in saving lives. Ever heard of the controversial “Broken Windows Theory? It posits that simple disorder can increase the tendency for crime in urban areas – if more trash isn’t removed, more will pile up. The New York City Transit Authority in the 1990s applied this to stop an increasing graffiti problem on subways, scrubbing down trains each night before resuming service the next morning. Over time, they got rid of the problem as other initiatives were put in place around the city, contributing to a remarkable decrease in vandalism and the crime rate.

When you ‘shine’ the workplace it has a positive impact on the operators working there. A dirty workplace tends to cause distraction and reduce employee morale and doesn’t convey a positive message about the company. With items in ready-to-use condition, working is safer with dust and dirt gone along with slipping and tripping hazards.

In short, a clean and safe workplace begets a safe and clean workplace.



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