While hosting a colleague and her husband for dinner last weekend, somehow the conversation drifted to the topic of strange pets people keep. My colleague’s spouse shared the hands-down winner, a story of an acquaintance – we’ll call her Kelly – who was so attached to her pet python that she slept in bed with it. Everything was going well until she noticed the snake had stopped eating. Concerned, she took the python to the vet, who told her why: Kelly’s bedfellow was starving itself for the big prey – her!

Mrinalini Gadkari Ground Zero, NYC

Author Mrinalini Gadkari in Manhattan

We might not know it, but we’re cuddled next to hungry snakes every day: The defects in our systems and processes lurking beneath the reworks we perform and roundabouts we take. Toyota Motor Corp. has a way to find those: An “Andon” cord, which flags a problem, prompts a hunt for its root cause and potentially pauses production if it can’t be solved immediately. When Lean Enterprise Institute CEO John Shook came to our Master of Business Operational Excellence program in October, he mentioned that the cord is pulled about 15,000 times a day at Toyota’s factory in Kentucky. “Better safe than sorry” seems to be their motto.

We rarely look at the process as a whole, instead we fix one incident and move on. We do root-cause analyses and fix problems, but do we really track if those changes have succeeded? Most root-cause analyses become a part of files and folders opened only when a regulatory agency visits the organization. In the meantime, how many times do we allow errors and defects to pass on to the customer?

Reworks are like enemies in disguise. Keep them out of bed.



Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Add Your Thoughts


+ 3 = 7