Undergraduate vs. Graduate

In a lot of ways, the Master of Accounting program functions like a fifth-year of undergrad. The majority of the students earn their undergraduate degree mere months before starting the program and therefore have less than a year of work experience. Because of this, I did not anticipate any challenges in adjusting to graduate school. As the end of my first term nears, I feel qualified to say that my expectations were very wrong.

So how is the MAcc different from my undergraduate accounting experience?

1. GROUP WORK. I am part of a group in every class. During high school and college, I did everything in my power to avoid working in a group setting, preferring to complete projects on my own. At Fisher, that is not an option– and I could not be more grateful! I am currently enrolled in four courses, and each one has some kind of group component. I think what sets these groups apart from those I have been a part of in the past is the fact that everybody cares about the outcome and our objectives all align.

2. THE CURRICULUM. Because I did not declare my accounting major until the beginning of my junior year, I experienced a bit of a time crunch in satisfying all of the course requirements. As a result, I was unable to take as many electives as I would have liked. Within the MAcc program, there are only 4 required courses that make up 10 of the 31 required hours; I have the flexibility to fill the rest of my schedule with classes that really interest me. Having so many different options is intimidating, but I am so thankful for the opportunity.

3. THE MATERIAL. It makes sense that the concepts we are covering in class are more advanced than those I learned during undergrad. The work is far less mechanical in nature and requires more critical reasoning skills. One of the core courses is Financial Reporting, which builds upon the concepts taught in Intermediate Accounting. Unlike Intermediate, where the bulk of the workload was comprised of practice problems, Financial Reporting involves actually applying the principles to various cases. There are definitely days when I miss the simplicity of the practice exercises, journal entries, and comprehensive problems, but there is also something incredibly rewarding about applying my knowledge to real-life financial statements.

It is crazy to think that I am about a quarter of the way through my MAcc journey. It has been overwhelming at times, but that is all part of the experience!