Under the Weather

Actually, if you talk to a number of people in the program, you’d hear the opposite: they’re “so over the weather”.  Yes, friends, we’ve just started to get some more snow over the past two days.  Heh.  In the melodic words of Bachman-Turner Overdrive: “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet”.

As for me, since starting on our student health insurance plan, I have encountered three occasions that required prescription meds.  The most recent occurred this week.  The quarter started on Monday and by Tuesday afternoon in Cost Accounting, I could tell my cold was developing into something more.  I hoped for the best (2pm) and opted to see how things developed.  By 8pm that night, I was miserable and opted to inform my roommate of that fact every couple of minutes.  He knew I was sick but had no idea to what extent . . . until I grabbed a flashlight and had him glance at the back of my throat.  Sparing you the details, I’ll leave it at: it was quite a mess.

Here’s the thing: as students, we have health coverage for doctors appointments and unanticipated illness.  We can make appointments to be seen at the Wilce Health Center… which is fine and dandy as long as you don’t need to be seen outside of the hours of 8am-5pm M-F or 8am-noon on Saturdays (unless there’s a football game and then you’re out of luck).  Appointments are meant to be scheduled in advance.  Unfortunately, many of us can’t pre-plan when we’re going to really need to see a doctor.  Considering that, you can call in the morning and try to get seen the same day.  I had to do that in October and it happened to work out extremely well.  That time, I called at 7:30am and got a lab appt followed by a doctor’s appointment within about an hour.  The process there went like clockwork: all ran on time and I was in and out within about an hour.  There’s a pharmacy on site and I was good to go.  That was October . . .

. . . flash back to the nastiness of my throat infection on a Tuesday night ….

After seeing the mess my throat became, my roommate was a bit freaked out and worried (it really was nasty) and believed I should seek more immediate medical attention rather than wait until 7:30am and try to score an appointment at the health center.  By this time (10pm), the alternative treatment options listed on the website had all closed for the day… all except for one: the OSU Medical Center Emergency Room.

Desperate times call for desperate measures . . . but I really did not want to be one of “those people” tying up emergency resources for something non-critical (it’s not like I had a severed arm).  I was really on the fence: my situation was becoming increasingly dire and I didn’t want to be up a proverbial creek the next morning unable to attend class AND unable to get an appointment.  For reassurance, I called the phone number listed and spoke with a delightful woman named Nicole.  She said they’ve treated people with less serious issues; if I wanted to come in to see a doctor I should.  Given that, I opted to give it a go and head over there . . . knowing the wait would likely be a long one.  I wasn’t mistaken.  My roommate, aspiring for sainthood, chose to accompany me.  By 3am we were at a 24-hr CVS picking up my prescriptions.  We woke up at 7am to make it to classes (8:30am start).

The first time I needed to see a doctor was a few days after our insurance began but a couple of weeks before school was actually in session.  I did not have my student insurance card yet and was unsure of how everything worked.  Luckily, there is a lot of pertinent information listed on the OSU web and I was able to reach the website of the administrator of our student insurance plan.  On their site, I registered and gained immediate access to a version of my insurance card.  With a printout in hand, I visited a local urgent care center (the Wilce Health Center wasn’t open; it was a weekend during break) and was taken care of rather promptly.  The only dismay came when getting my prescription filled: if you don’t do it at the pharmacy on campus, the cost is out of pocket.  Luckily, I was still on my previous employer’s insurance and could use their prescription coverage to make ends meet.

So, to quickly summarize: OSU has outstanding facilities and services available to students.  With pre-planning, all works like clockwork.  Unexpected illness can be dealt with rather timely although a small wait could be involved.  Our medical staff and support personnel are professional, courteous, and very patient-oriented.  They are truly a first-class operation at the OSU Medical Center as well as the Wilce Health Center.  I am very happy with the treatment I’ve received and I’m confident you will be too.  To me, it is just one more reason to illustrate the power of a large research university backing an intimate and individual MBA program like Fisher.  You get the best of both worlds.



The content and opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by The Ohio State University or Fisher College of Business.