Toilet paper trivia

You never know what you’ll learn in school. That’s what’s exciting about it right.

One thing I never expected to learn while in business school – toilet paper. But I did. I learned a WHOLE LOT about toilet paper.

tpI learned that you should add toilet paper as another thing made in china. The very first TP was used by the Emperor of China in 1391. Each sheet was 2 by 3 feet. The biggest innovation in toilet paper was placing it on a roll. This was first introduced by Scott Paper Company in 1879. However, TP was such a private issue that Scott could not convince customers and merchants to talk about it. They could not even have an advertisement for it. So, they made customized orders per merchants, resulting in about 2,000 private labels. The Waldorf brand (yes, that’s the Hotel) was the most popular.

Another surprising thing – the first “splinter-free” toilet paper was not available until 1935. Yikes! And you thought your toilet paper was rough. :p

How did I learn all this?

The first project for my Marketing Innovation class is to present a product which was innovative and revolutionary that it changed the industry. I had a different idea at first but found it hard to find evidence to support the claim. I suddenly spotted a huge roll of paper towels and had a “Eureka” moment.

I was able to use my TP knowledge during the Kimberly-Clark Brand Olympics last week. I talked about it with classmates and the KC employees. I wasn’t able to use it in the games though. Knowledge does not help much in diaper races, tampon slingshots, or toilet paper three-legged races.If only they had a quiz bee, I would have rocked it. :D

Want to learn more? Here are some sources:

http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/toiletpaper.htm

http://www.scottcommonsense.com/AboutScott.aspx#1879-1930

http://www.kimberly-clark.com/pdfs/Toilet%20Tissue%20on%20a%20Roll%20Evolution.pdf

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/story?id=93597&page=1



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