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Internship Success Stories

The Office of Career Management has helped Fisher undergraduates find internship opportunities in a wide variety of industries across the country and around the globe. Select a company below to read some of the internship success stories of past and current Fisher students.

Graduate StudentsUndergraduate Students

Bullet Deloitte Consulting

Mittal Harri

 

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

I did put a lot of effort on networking during my internship search. I attended few career fairs apart from participating in the networking events organized by Fisher. These experiences helped me identify and target the roles/positions that interest me. Additionally, I connected with OSU/Fisher alumni across various companies using Linkedin Groups such as Buckeye Alumni Network and Fisher MBA Alumni. OSU/Fisher Alumni have been very responsive and more than happy to talk to me and help me with connecting to the right people.

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I interned with Deloitte Consulting LLP over summer in their Technology Strategy group. During the internship, I was presented with the opportunity to work on the post merger strategic planning process for a large US bank. The objective of the project was to help design a five year strategy roadmap for the organization. I was responsible for developing the project management and prioritization process needed to execute the IT projects in the midst of the corporate merger.  Additionally, I also designed a project financial forecasting model to help allocate and forecast IT Project budget needs. This experience gave me an opportunity to work with C-level executives as well as to hone the ability to think on my feet and effectively communicate my ideas.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

Networking is very critical not only for securing an internship but also for career beyond. During my internship, I realized that by creating a strong network, I was able to create opportunities that previously did not exist for me. Not only did I benefit from my network but I was also able to help some of my friends with contacts that increased their own opportunities. Overall, I realized that networking is a quintessential social skill required to succeed in one’s career.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

Starting internship search early, extensive networking and support from office of career management, fisher alumni, seniors, classmates and other friends helped me secure my summer internship. I firmly believe that strong commitment and ownership towards one’s career is essential to succeed as thousands of smart MBAs are competing for similar roles. It is very easy to feel lost and get frustrated unless you identify what you are looking for and be focused about it.

Bullet Dunnhumby

Eric Luebke

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

Networking was a huge factor in the success of my internship search.  When I came back for my MBA I was making a slight career change and I knew that I would need to get advice and help from the right people in the industry I was going after.  Some of the key resources I used where Jennifer Heckscher, in the career management office, and Larry Robinson, MBA professor, who helped direct me to other people that might assist with me getting an interview and an opportunity with dunnhumby.  I also attended many speakers and other professional events which helped me gain many contacts in the industry. From these resources I made business contacts with current employees and future employees at dunnhumby that I feel that made all the difference for when they extended internship offers.

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

My main project was to analyze dunnhumby’s loyalty proposition and form a best practices and roadmap for future use of the company and recommend areas to add/develop capabilities for future clients.  From this main project came a whole bunch of other projects such as competitive analysis, gap analysis, writing a case study, and recommendations of an integrated marketing plan for the rollout of a loyalty program. 

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned from my internship at dunnhumby was that I was there because they wanted my opinion and recommendations for current issues in the company.  I wasn’t given a prepackage internship assignment but something that was new and relevant and needed solved.  I also really learned the importance of collaborating with current employees at dunnhumby to draw on their expertise to help me succeed in my objectives.  

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

The most critical factors in preparing to succeed in my internship were my prior work experience, class room learning, and collaboration.  My work history definitely helped prepare me for many of my roles and confidence in the workplace while the classroom learning gave me a better knowledge of many of the tools and strategies needed to succeed in my project assignments.  The most critical factor, however, was effectively being able to collaborate and work as a team.  Even though I was given specific projects they all involved many other experts in dunnhumby to be able to complete with the best results.

Bullet eProximiti

Anna Szerszen

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

As a graduate student-athlete, my schedule was very full and it was difficult for me to network a lot. On top of that, I had to manage both summer athletic commitments with an internship experience. Knowing that I was in a unique position, I focused on actively communicating with Career Management professionals and establishing a strong relationship with them. Jamie Mathews Mead is the Career Consultant who played the biggest role in my internship search. She was aware of my unique situation and provided me with valuable advice to be successful in handling my career goals and athletic commitments. I applied for a lot of different positions through Fisher Connect and responded to many emails sent by Career Management staff. The companies listed in the Wheeler Internship program seemed very interesting since most were smaller in size and could fulfill my need for a flexible schedule. I finally decided to join eProximiti, a local technology marketing firm and helped the company leaders conduct some major industry and consumer research. 

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I joined eProximiti as an intern research analyst to help the company leaders conduct major research on the mobile marketing industry as well as the consumer side of the business. During my internship experience, I worked with the founders and current company leaders to analyze competitive products, evaluate pricing strategies and isolate best practices required for long term success in the growing mobile marketplace. I also conducted interviews with mobile marketing professionals and performed SWOT analyses of mobile products/services. Finally, I delivered five research papers presenting findings and actionable recommendations. eProximiti used these documents to grow their business by strengthening current partners and involving potential clients in a possible partnership.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship? 

eProximiti is a small entrepreneurial company ran by two co-founders who are also family members (father and son). These two leaders both acted as my direct supervisors and, although they were related, they had very different business visions and expectations from me. Thus, I learned how to be an entrepreneur myself. Indeed, there were many instances when my two superiors did not agree on a project or way to go about an issue. In order to reconcile their diverging views, I stepped up and proactively suggested my work and opinions. It was sometimes difficult to coordinate and satisfy their requirements, but I was able to develop my own perspective by performing a solid analysis using the skills and knowledge I acquired in my MBA core classes. 

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

Because of my unique situation involving both work experience and athletic commitments, I was very flexible and open minded about my internship experience. This allowed me to accept the challenges of reporting to two very different supervisors and coordinating their diverging requirements. The first year of my MBA also helped me develop many skills and capabilities that I used in my internship. On top of the academic knowledge I acquired, the program allowed me to structure a logical way of thinking and analyzing problems to quickly and creatively solve issues. Also, the numerous events at Fisher enhanced my communication, networking and presentation skills, which were crucial for my success at eProximiti.

Bullet KFC

Lauren Griffith

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

In conducting my internship search, I learned very quickly that being authentic would take me a long way.  When meeting representatives from companies, I just tried to be myself and demonstrated genuine interest in what experiences they shared from their organizations.  For me, it was all about culture fit!  Not only does the company want you, you have to want the company!  The mock interview with career management was a great resource in helping me target companies that I would be best suited for.  I will never forget how excited and engaged I was when Yum! came for the info session.

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

In KFC People Development, I was incredibly lucky to have such a breadth of project variety.  I worked with cross-functional partners to re-design the Team Member Handbook for all of our equity restaurants.   We were in the process of laying out a career map, so I created success profiles for 3 of our key field positions.  I also had the privilege to work with our franchise association and position the groundwork for a partnership survey.  Along with my individual projects, the five interns were assigned a team project to bring Customer Mania alive in our restaurants.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

I would have to say there are two things I learned in my internship that set me up for future success.  The first was to build know-how.  I came in with a mindset that I wanted to learn as much as I could about the organization, my function, and the role I played in the overall goals of the company.  The second was to build relationships or “Ching” as we call it at Yum!  Not only did I make some amazing friends over the summer and gain tremendous respect for the people I worked with, I built lasting relationships with mentors who would always be there for me in future career decisions. 

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

The Yum! formula for success is “People Capability First… satisfied customers and profitability follows.”  I felt like my internship was designed to highlight my capabilities and give me challenges that would be achievable and enable me to learn as much as possible. 

Bullet Kmart

Brian Blewitt

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

I placed a lot of emphasis on networking when conducting my internship search.  I attended many information sessions for companies in which I was interested, and stayed in contact with employees I met at the information session.  Interestingly, I was not offered an internship at any of the companies with which I was well networked, but I was offered a position by a company with which I did absolutely no networking.  I did have an opportunity to do an internship with a small German-based software company, which came about through networking with my brother-in-law who works there.

The key resources and events I found most helpful were information sessions.  Those, I found, were the best venues to meet employees from target companies.  I also networked extensively with 2nd-year MBA students who had completed internships at some of my target companies.  This was especially helpful if I had an interview with one of those companies, as the 2nd-year students were able to give me really good insight into what to expect. 

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

My primary project revolved around creating a marketing program for in-store, online, and print promotion of Disney’s Tinker Bell in all Kmart stores.  I worked closely with Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, and collaborated extensively with Kmart store operations, signage, marketing, social media, and web departments to create marketing collateral and a marketing platform that appeared cohesive to consumers.  The program was to run two weeks in the front of each store, and feature Tinker Bell branded merchandise from apparel, electronics, home entertainment, and other Kmart business units.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned from my internship was how critical it is to ask questions.  Never pretend like you know what you’re talking about when you don’t.  I had to learn that, just because I have an MBA, I don’t know everything (in fact, I know very little!)  Be humble and seek the advice and guidance of others.  Do good work, but don’t be afraid to say “I don’t understand how this works, can you explain it to me?”

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

The most important thing I did to prepare myself to succeed in my summer internship was to make sure I understood, in great detail, all of the deliverables and, more importantly, stakeholders involved in my primary project.  I highly suggest having an in-depth Q&A with your internship mentor, or manager, at the very beginning of your internship in order to fully understand what is expected of you, and what people you should work with in order to most effectively accomplish your deliverables.

Bullet Momentive Performance Materials

Eva Verghese

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

Networking was definitely important to me during my internship search. My primary networking resource was LinkedIn. It’s a great way to connect with someone who is already connected to your network.  

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I had the opportunity to consult with Momentive Performance Materials over the summer. The company (earlier a GE subsidiary) had a policy book written in the 70’s that needed to be rewritten and reorganized to reflect new policies in an accessible format. I was involved in creating a new employee policies and procedures book that reflected the policies of the Newark Quartz Plant facility. I was also involved in the change process that involved working with management throughout the process and ensuring buy-in from the policy committee.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

This project was a very big learning experience for me. I not only learned about policy books (a subject I was not fully aware of) but I also had the opportunity to apply my leadership skills in leading the project as a consultant. My knowledge and experience within the field of HR was extremely useful to me in defining the policies. I gained great project management experience as well.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

The confidence I had in myself and the desire to learn was what drove me to succeed in this project.  I took up a role and a project I knew nothing about and turned it into a learning opportunity.

Bullet Scotts Miracle-Gro Company

Claire Murnane

 

How much emphasis did you place on networking when conducting your internship search and what were some of the key resources and/or events you found to be most useful?

 Networking was critical to my internship search. I attended several information sessions hosted by companies who were in search of interns for the following summer. Specifically, I attended the Nestle and Scotts Miracle-Gro information sessions. Attending those events allowed me to network with company employees and inquire about the hiring process. I found these events to be very useful not only to help me better understand the marketing (brand management) internships, but to make connections with Fisher alumnae who work at the respective companies.

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

The company assigned three projects that were focused on demonstrating my creative, strategic and analytical skills. The creative project was designed to allow me to manage a project from start to finish and work with the in-house designers on in-store communication signage. The strategic project was focused on analyzing a market and how to grow the business within that market. I also completed a pricing analysis and marketing plan that was included in the strategic project. The analytical project examined the performance of a product line and I provided recommendations on how to optimize sales in 2011.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

I learned the responsibilities and expectations of an associate brand manager. I also learned about the corporate culture and was able to determine if it was a right fit for me.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your summer internship?

I utilized my resources and inquired about the responsibilities prior to beginning my internship. Specifically, I reached out to previous interns and discussed their experiences and projects so I was fully prepared and knew what to expect.

Bullet Alcoa

What did you do?

I interned in Information Systems with Alcoa.  My projects over the summer involved a lot of testing applications and running queries through Oracle.  The company wants to upgrade their database system and I was responsible for writing test scripts for two specific applications.  These were step-by-step instructions on how to navigate and perform functions within the applications.  I also did some testing with Discoverer.  I checked to see if there were any bugs or minor fixes that needed to be made so a developer can fix them before the upgrade.

- Lee P. Miller, Information Systems Intern

The most critical factors..

The most critical factors that prepared me for a successful internship have been the outside activities that Fisher provides to Ohio State Students (Career Management, clubs and organizations). Career Management helped prepare me with the skills I would need while interviewing for the Alcoa internship. 

- Kristin Hogan, Human Resources Intern

The most important thing learned..

The most important thing I learned this summer is to ask “good questions”. I know people say there is no such thing as a bad question, but that is simply not always true. Sometimes as interns we want to do so well that we don’t think through something thoroughly enough to completely understand it. We then ask questions without thinking and this takes away from our learning experience. If you’re struggling with something, think about it for 15 minutes from all different angles and try to come to a conclusion. If you still have a question, at least you know more about the problem from thinking about it.

- Jason R. Geiger, Finance Intern

Bullet Amazon

Scott Rosenthal

What did you do?

I interned as an Amazon.com Leadership Intern at the Fulfillment Center. I managed the Inbound day shift within the facility, overseeing over 30 employees within the department alongside my two Manager's. Every step from receiving a truck to stowing its contents onto shelves. Additionally, I researched and developed solutions to improve the daily tasks performed within the Inbound department, and presented an analysis to the Senior team at the end of my internship.

What was the most important thing you learned?

The most important thing I learned over my ten weeks was the importance of managing your team the right way. The person-to-person interaction I experienced on a daily basis truly taught me the importance of developing a team the right way and using this rapport to drive positive results.

What critical factors prepared you for success?

The most critical factors that prepared me for a successful internship were the interpersonal skills that I developed throughout my academic and extracurricular experiences. Reflecting on the lessons learned from these instances aided me in performing in a confident and respectful manner. The development of my team and their subsequent motivation to perform at a high-level was set-up from the many experiences with my peers throughout my time at Fisher and Ohio State.

Bullet Boeing

Brent Rothchild

“The major project I worked on this summer involved several components that incorporated many of the skills I was able to acquire through my school work within Fisher. I was mainly in charge of creating and updating a piece of the cost forecast for the 787 Dreamliner project.  It was a great experience to be able to work so closely with a project that has been followed by many in the financial sector for the past decade and I am truly grateful for the opportunity.”

Julie Prenger

“I think the most critical factor in preparing for my internship was my involvement with the American Marketing Association at OSU.  Having a leadership role within this club gave me a good foundation of confidence, responsibility, and communication skills to build from.”

Brian Sherman Jr.

“Boeing is one of the largest airplane manufacturers in the world and working there this summer was really exciting because the company was in the process of releasing two new airplanes. One of my main projects for the summer was to perform a cost benefit analysis of changing configuration of parts from suppliers for my build section.  I was able to interact with professionals from many disciplines other than strictly finance, which is my major.”

Jason Moore

“Without a doubt, the most important thing I got out of my internship was the thinking global mentality. One cannot truly learn international business without doing it. With this internship, I did international business. Everyday I was dealing with customers in South America and Africa. I can no longer look at the world as the U.S. and "foreign nations", but instead I see the world as a group of many different economies striving to get better.”

John E. Williams

“The importance of networking was the most important thing I learned. With a company that employs over 160,000 people worldwide, it is imperative to make connections throughout the company. I did this by arranging informational interviews with managers from each different organization in Boeing. They were very helpful in showing me how diverse the company was with the countless jobs and opportunities and tips for working your way up in a large company.” 

Bullet Cardinal Health

 

Alex Shellhammer

My team and I planned an event for our 6,000 independent pharmacists and their families in Denver. We also planned an internal meeting for 2,000 of our sales representatives that took place in Anaheim. The most critical factor that prepared me for this internship was teamwork. Being involved in student organizations and working with teams for classes is undoubtedly the most important aspect to planning events, or really, to survive in business at all.

Stephanie Smith

I learned how to successfully work as a part of a team in a large organization like Cardinal Health. I improved my communication skills by collaborating with individuals on my team and across the organization. The most critical factors to my success were my leadership experiences in past jobs and student organizations. My accounting classes and CS&E helped prepare me most when it came to technical skills.

Melissa Harvey

The most important value I learned was the impact of networking. I conducted over 30 informational interviews throughout my internship; meeting with employees on the Medical, Pharmaceutical, and Lab Segments of Cardinal Health. It is truly the best way to learn about the business and its functions while meeting great contacts at the same time!

Miaisha Nunnally

The most important thing that I learned from my internship is that it is important to never stop learning even though you are not in a classroom setting.  In order to be successful in any company you have to learn about the business and keep current on all the new things that are occurring. I learned that knowledge is power and in order to advance one can never stop learning.

Bullet Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola internsBriefly describe your major project(s) over the summer
While interning at Coca-Cola Enterprises my major projects were to acquiring new business (which includes restaurants, bars and convenient stores) and maintain existing business by implementing new products and improving the appearance of that retail store within the arena district and short north area of Columbus.
- Kyle Caldwell
This summer I led the creative development for all of Coca-Cola's brands including print, promotional, and brand management programs.  Throughout the creative development process I communicated with retailers such as Wal-Mart and Kroger, key national assets such as Live Nation and THE Ohio State University, advertising agencies, and Coca-Cola's legal depatment.  One of my favorite projects that I worked on this summer was the Coca-Cola Breast Cancer Awareness program.  I coordinated events and developed promotional materials in collaboration with Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the Siteman Cancer Center, and the St. Louis Cardinals in order to raise money for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Scholarship.
- Molly Masters-Selten
My major project for Coca-Cola was the Vault Assault Sampling Tour. A sampling tour is a program where a team usually consisting of 3 or 4 people sets up a display at a large event, such as a fair, amusement park, major concert or museum, etc., and they then pass out samples of whatever beverage, in this case Vault, that they are trying to promote.  My role in this process was similar to that of a manager. I worked directly with the Marketing Managers of whatever city the tour was going through and helped them to schedule locations for the team to go to. I then communicated those locations and dates to the Team Manager and made sure they and all of the clearances and permits necessary to sample.
- Kevin McCourt
What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?
The most important thing I have learned is to compromise and stress a win-win strategy with other individuals because working as a team builds long lasting relationships with customers and co-workers.
- Kyle Caldwell
There were two important things I learned from my internship; patience and teamwork.  There were a lot of times where the sampling team needed a place to go and myself and the Marketing Managers were having trouble finding a suitable location.  I had to be patient and trust that they would find somewhere for the team to go before it was too late.  And I couldn't have done anything this summer without the help of others.  I think the most important thing to remember in business and life is that there is only so much one person can do.
- Kevin McCourt
I learned how to lead multiple projects at once and that going above and beyond expectations is essential to success in the workplace.
- Molly Masters-Selten
What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?
Push yourself to be out your comfort zone and strive to be extroverted. Trying new job functions and taking part in the selling process gives you needed experience that can not be learned in a text book.
- Kyle Caldwell
This may sound weird, but the most critical factor that led to my success this summer and will lead to continued success in the future is maturity. I have never had a solid 9-5, Monday-Friday job before, and so I had a lot of growing up to do. I was in a new city with lots to do and see, but I had to realize that I don't have the hours and hours of free time that I was so used to having. I can't go out until 2 in the morning on a weekday because I have to get up and give 100% in the morning. And I think that is one thing a lot of people my age need to realize. In a few years, and for some a few months there are going to be very high expectations of you, and the only way to rise to those expectations is to be mature.
- Kevin McCourt
Knowledge of the company, strong background in Microsoft Office (especially Excel and Powerpoint), and good time management and communication skills.
- Molly Masters-Selten

Bullet Deloitte

 

 Yi Shan
- Deloitte Consulting, Hong Kong

What did you learn from your internship?

Learn and travel as much as possible in school, as there's too much to learn and too little time to travel once we start working.

What advice would you give to Fisher students who are considering consulting?

Go out and seek opportunities if they don't come to you. Being persistent and proactive helped me win the internship in the first place. When I first started, I wasn't put on any projects. Instead of sitting around and doing nothing, I went around the office and introduced myself to everybody, from analysts to partners. People started to ask me to help out and soon enough, I was officially placed on two great projects.


Nick Eyer
– Deloitte Consulting

What Did You Do?

During the first 8 weeks of my internship
I worked on the accounting workstream, implementing a shared services operating model to standardize accounting processes, procedures and policies across the enterprise. Some of my contributions included rightsizing the accounting organization, developing a headcount tracking model, and facilitating a title management workshop series.

What advice would you give to Fisher students who are considering consulting?

Reach out to people who have consulting experience and make an effort to learn about all aspects of consulting.  Definitely consider enrolling in Fisher Emerging Consultants during your third year as it will increase your knowledge of consulting, expand your network, and give you a better idea of whether or not consulting is right for you. 

Bullet Dow Chemical

https://fisher.osu.edu/i/pb/images/13173/Dow.jpg

Nidhi Jackson

Briefly describe your major project over the summer.

This summer I was fortunate to be part of a special team working on implementing a new information system for Dow's global operations.  With a presence in over 30 countries this task poses some huge challenges for Dow, especially regarding consistency with transactional processes.  One of my responsibilities was to create the work process flows for activities to be performed by the purchase to pay department using the newly implemented system.  My work will provide a reference to ensure that transactions made in Shanghai, China are consistent with those in Sao Paulo, Brazil and so on.  

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most valuable lesson I learned is the importance of communication and clarity.  Communication is integral to fulfilling your responsibilities and to learning and understanding the work you are doing.  In order to be effective you have to ensure that you have the information you need and that your co-workers understand what you are trying to do so that they can support you when necessary. 

What do you think was the most critical factor in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

A critical factor to my success was having the confidence to make the most of my experience.  I never hesitated to approach my coworkers for assistance and explanation.  I also got the opportunity to speak with the management of various business practices and got a very realistic perspective of Dow's culture and structure.  

Sarah Vasey

Briefly describe your major project over the summer.

I worked on a benchmarking framework that identifies areas for improvement in Dow's Logistics ESOP process. This project is cutting edge in that Dow is one of the only companies that seeks to balance logistics supply and demand. It is a proactive, future focused process that gave me a global view of the company. I really enjoyed it!

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

I learned that working with others is the best way to pick up on any skill. By networking and trying to attend as many group discussions as possible, I was able to learn what I needed to complete my project. You have to be willing to ask questions and learn from everyone around you.

What do you think was the most critical factor in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

I definitely think my classes at Ohio State have taught me how to me disciplined in my work. I meet deadlines and stay focused, and a large part of that is because of the professors I have had in Fisher. Our classes are challenging, but professors are approachable and open to questions, just like my supervisor and colleagues at Dow.

Bullet Eaton

Stephen Marks

The What Did You Do?
My most significant daily task required monitoring $1.5B of intercompany financing among several of Eaton Corp’s Mexican subsidiaries. For an international company like Eaton, foreign exchange (FX) exposure is of huge importance, so much of my time dealt with understanding and analyzing foreign exchange exposure. For example, I developed a matrix template to analyze the centralization of companywide FX hedging for thirty-seven foreign currencies.

What Did You Learn?
The most valuable thing I learned was the importance of networking. We hear about networking all the time from professors and recruiters but it can’t be stressed enough. I’ve made many contacts in my short time at Eaton, both inside and outside the company, and I’d suggest any intern do the same. From young professionals to seasoned management, everyone has a unique perspective regarding life and career development, and can offer useful insight as we make the transition to the working world. Interns and new hires are at a unique advantage in that most upper management is willing to spend some time to meet with those who reach out.

Molly Taylor

What Did You Do?
I had the opportunity to choose my project, and I chose to lead a project to document the current state of Eaton's IT onboarding process for new employees, which is the process by which network and email accounts are created, and computers, peripherals, and software are ordered.  I then put together a set of recommendations on how to improve the process, to ensure that new employees have everything they need from IT by the time they start work.

Preparation for success..
My prior experience managing projects was very helpful in giving me the time management and planning skills I needed to complete the project I developed and managed during my summer with Eaton.  The project work I had done for Target, in a prior internship, and for the Columbus Museum of Art and Abercrombie & Fitch for the Contract Honors Program, all contributed to my success this summer. 

Alex Lui

What Did You Do?
During my internship, I assisted my project manager by providing a thorough analysis of all the Eaton Business Excellence Examiners and Senior Examiners. I spent the majority of my time creating visual aids that summarized the examiner data, and presented it in a way that was simple to understand. I also gained extensive knowledge on database management at a large Fortune 200 company, which will definitely benefit me in the future. 
     
What Did You Learn?
The most important thing I learned from my internship is communication plays a valuable role in the work place. The ability to communicate with another individual in a timely manner is one of the determining factors of completing a project on time or not. I learned that it is rare to complete a project by yourself, and you must rely on the help from others in order to complete a project.

Bullet Eli Lilly

Kimberly  Pavlescak

Student at Eli Lilly

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

My internship was in the business to business segment of Lilly USA.  I worked cross-functionally with both the brand teams and the sales force to determine the utilization of over 150 marketing materials.  I made recommendations about all of the materials; some should be retired while others should continue to be stocked. I also exposed gaps in the current system and worked to find solutions.  My project improved efficiency, allowing the sales force to focus more on the customers and less on material management.      

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing that I learned this summer was the importance of teamwork.  During the first week of my internship my manager was promoted and she started transitioning to her new position.  Many times I was not able to reach her when I needed help or if I had questions.   My team stepped up and was always there to help.  I was able to learn much more about my team and I assisted many of my teammates with their own projects.    

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

I believe that the Health Care Industry Cluster was essential in preparing me for my internship at Eli Lilly.  I started my internship with an understanding of the industry, unlike many of the other interns.  This allowed me to dive right into my work and to be able to understand the topics covered in meetings.  Also, the cluster allowed me the opportunity to polish my presentation skills this past spring when I completed my project segment of the course.  

Bullet Ethicon Endo-Surgery

Ethicon Endo-Surgery internsWhat did you do?
As a finance intern I was given 1 major project to see through from beginning to end. My project goal was to increase the sustainability of our Sarbanes-Oxley processes. I gathered information and performed analysis on all of the key data: number of internal controls, finance vs. non-finance control owners, and the level of automation. I used a variety of process excellence tools to better understand the main problems. (SIPOC analysis, stakeholder analysis, fishbone diagrams, flow charting, and gathering benchmark data or best practices). Using this information I put together an implementation plan, standardizing processes, working with internal and external auditors and implementing a team structure. I then presented the project to the finance leadership and began implementing the final solution.
- Laura Mauro
What did you learn?
Get involved, and I don't just mean at school. Join the company sports teams, go to all the "non-required" events and set up one on one meetings with as many people as possible. Let your work speak for itself, but be sure that people know who you are. Make a place for yourself within the company culture so that both you and the company can determine if you are really are a good fit for a full-time position.
- Laura Mauro
As an intern, you are working inside a fishbowl - everything you do is under constant observation by everyone around you. Thus, my experience at Ethicon Endo-Surgery has re-emphasized with me that "Attitude is Everything." Having a can do, will do, positive attitude all of the time goes a long way.
- Mike Williams
What advice do you have for others?
Brush up on your soft skills. The technical skills are all in place from your classes, be confident in your abilities and sell yourself to the company. But on a day to day basis it's really the informal conversations with managers, lunch with colleagues, and even formal presentations that make you stick out
as a candidate.
- Laura Mauro
Be pro-active - Contact the appropriate people who can help you achieve your immediate and long term goals. Plan ahead - When you know you are going to be in front of an important person, know exactly what you want to accomplish during your conversation. Close - Ask the individual to commit to you what it is you set out to get from them (an interview, an offer, whatever it may be). If you don't ask, you won't get it. And all the while - Be Professional.
- Mike Williams

Bullet Exel

Justin Kill

 

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I was involved in a lot of major projects during my time with Exel.  During my time there I assisted with starting their new warehouse for thinkgeek.com. The first project was helping to design the layout of the new warehouse management system that was being implemented. After that I participated in the testing of the new system. The testing was a very important project because I helped find a lot of flaws in the system. After running the test I moved into assisting the management team in the actual go live operations of the new warehouse. All of the projects were very exciting but I enjoyed the opening go live process the most.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

I have learned a lot of valuable knowledge this summer, but the most important thing that I learned was the importance of people.  I learned that it is impossible to run a company by yourself, and it is very important to trust the people around you. When times get tough and things need to get done, delegation is really your best friend.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship? 

A lot of different factors play into being prepared for an internship, but a couple of things really stand out.  First, it is very important to be open-minded and ready for anything. In my experience plans changed day by day, and I was asked to do almost anything.  Secondly, it is very important to be prepared to learn. Bring a pad of paper and a pen everyday because a learning experience can pop up at anytime. Third, it is very important to get sleep before each day of work. Try not to stay out all night and show up to work half asleep.

Bullet Ford

What Did  You Do?

This summer, Ford put me in charge of coordinating the launch of the 2012 Ford Focus, serving as a market analyst, and providing general support for the marketing team, all within the Central Market Area covering Dallas, Memphis, Kansas City, and Houston regions. - Tyler C. Hill

The most important thing I learned...

I learned from my internship was to truly network with people I came across. Throughout my trips to dealerships, I
worked to build relationships with the owners, managers, sale consultants, or anyone I could come in contact with if a question ever arose. I was very fortunate to have coworkers with me who introduced me to people, however it was my responsibility to maintain these relations once the initial introductions were over.  If it hadn't been for connecting and making relationships with the people I met in all levels of operations, I would have struggled to learn what to look for in regards to dealership processes and how to spot where improvements needed to be
made. - Kelsey Gerken

The most critical factor for success...

Preparing me to succeed at my internship was my experience in the Honors Cohort Program. Beyond introducing me to some of the most amazing people in the Fisher College of Business, Cohort gave me a true sense of how to present myself in the business world. We were fortunate to have several successful business leaders speak to our class and teach us of their work experiences. I have found that while working I often think of the advice they gave while presenting, and work harder to make myself better everyday. - Kelsey Gerken

Having the ability to work on and manage a team is very important to succeed at any internship, especially one in corporate finance. Every assignment I had was team based, there was also a great deal of information and software I needed to access which I never would have found had I not turned to my teammates for guidance. - Kevin Hidas

Bullet Frito Lay

Ashley Holland

 

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I was responsible for increasing sales and market share in 105 accounts in small format stores throughout the urban market of Columbus. I also had to coordinate and recruit participants for 4 community events with the Lay's brand, while tying in incremental space in local grocery stores to promote the events. 

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned this summer is how to successfully manage and contribute to a team, and how to analyze sales mix and business reviews to increase account growth.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

The most critical factor in helping me succeed at my internship was always planning ahead and managing my time as efficiently as possible.  

Bullet General Mills

Jahrael McDowell

What Did You Do?

This summer I was responsible for developing an inbound raw materials damage goods process at the Lodi, CA plant.

What Did You Learn?

First, you must be flexible and open to change.  Throughout my internship, every question would lead to another question or conversation, which caused continual shifting of timeline and deliverables.  You have to be willing and open to adjust as necessary. Also developing your communication skills will come a long way when you enter the business world and you are working with people from different functions and departments throughout.

Michael Falcon

What Did You Do?

I was responsible for raw materials planning of corrugated packaging. On a daily basis, I worked with our vendor, production schedulers, and in SAP to order over 100 different SKU’s of boxes. In addition to ordering, I had to maintain optimal inventory levels, manage inbound orders from our vendor, and make sure the plant never ran out of materials.

What Did You Learn?

The true value of organization – especially my email inbox. Historically, I’m not the most organized person but I couldn’t afford that this summer. Knowing where everything makes accomplishing work much more efficient.

Alex Helin

What Did You Do?

I was responsible for deployment of all Pillsbury refrigerated and Yoplait products at our Murfreesboro, Tennessee plant. This involved analyzing risk/customer orders in order to create and manage over 400 truckloads a month using SAP.

What Did You Learn?

The most important thing I learned was the value of a cross-functional team. I had to work with a variety of functions (systems engineers, manufacturing, quality & regulations). Through consistently communicating with these employees, I was able to find solutions to problems I could not solve on my own. In addition, I was able to learn about each of these fields, which is an experience one might not get in a typical office setting.

Bullet Giant Eagle

Sherwin Williams - Megan HoldrenBriefly describe your major project(s) over the summer
I currently have three major projects for the summer.  First, since Giant Eagle is a retail business, I am completing a retail rotation throughout my store in New Albany.  As part of this rotation, I get to spend a day or two with the Manager (or "Leader" as we call them) of the various departments including Produce, Meat, Deli, Front End, Back Office, etc. to see how each department is run and what happens on a day-to-day basis.  The idea is to utilize this rotation experience in the store to help with my second major project, which I am working on with several other interns at the corporate office in Pittsburgh.  The goal of this team effort is to evaluate the impact of Giant Eagle's markdown process on known loss within the chain, as well as to suggest improvements to the process.  Third, as an individual assignment from my Store Leader, I am comparing the sign package within my store to the signage within a local competitor.  This involves many covert stealth missions.
- Kevin Neilon
My store level projects over the summer were to dissect the P&L Statements and accordingly look for any recommendations for the future to help improve the profitability of the store, organize a team member appreciation cookout and to 5-S sections of the stores backroom to increase the efficiency of the team members in my location. I also have to complete a full retail rotation into every department in the store and GetGo, to learn the foundations of the store level.
We also have a corporate level project. There were a few to choose from but mine asks to define the current successes and failures of the markdown process, specifically in the grocery department. This is a major threat to the profitability of the chain. While investigating the current process we were able to do a root cause analysis and come up with unique solution to Giant Eagle's main shrink problem.
- Kirsten Scott
This summer I have been working on an in-depth project for corporate about Shrink. Shrink can also be called "Unknown Loss". This is very important to the retail industry as 2% of all profits are lost to this. Shrink can be damaged, stolen, or unmarked product. I was specifically working with Discontinued Products in the Grocery Section of Giant Eagle.
At Store Level, I have been working on a “mystery shop project”. Mystery shoppers come weekly to all stores and rate departments on levels of customer service. My project has involved interacting with each department and designing optimal scripts for new hires or employees who has been unsuccessful in past mystery shops. Designing a more appropriate incentive package for employees revolving around customer service has also been part of this process.
- Grace Diffenbacher.
What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?
I have learned so much this summer at Giant Eagle, but the most important thing I will take away from this experience is an immense appreciation for great employees and co-workers.  After working with many different types of employees and managers, I see how important it is to make building a great team the number one priority.  I've always heard about how good people are a company's most valuable asset, but not until seeing what it takes to make every level of such a large organization function smoothly did it really sink in.
- Kevin Neilon
Picking one is very tough but I would say how to interact with people. Through it may sound elementary, you need to know how to interact with your executives, with your employees and also your customer and a lot of times you have to say the same thing to all of them, each in a different way.
- Daniel Kujawa
The whole summer has really been about real world experiences. That is the most rewarding item on my list. I have learned so much of the day to day activities that drive Giant Eagle's success and being able to use my knowledge to benefit Giant Eagle is exciting. It is truly hard to pick just one important item to tell Fisher about this summer, but all of the items I have had to work on have really kept me busy and have given me real world experience that cannot be beat! 
- Kirsten Scott
What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?
I have come to realize that the most critical factor in preparing me to succeed at my internship was challenging myself at OSU every day.  I learned some great things sitting in lectures, but the most valuable experiences I have had at Ohio State resulted from seeking out opportunities and getting everything I could out of them.  
- Kevin Neilon
I think that some of the critical factors to succeed in my internship was discipline through time management and also not being afraid to step out of the box. The former is obviously when someone has many projects, along with working 40 hours a week in the store for the retail rotation. The latter is important because you can never be afraid to speak up and let yourself be heard, if you don't then you will not get anywhere
- Daniel Kujawa
Being able to balance work, school and fun at OSU made the busy summer easier to manage.
-  Andy Green
I have had so many opportunities over the summer to really show what I have learned at Fisher. I have worked at Giant Eagle for two years so this was a different look into the organization that what I had been used to in previous years. I had a general understanding what each department did, Giant Eagle's goals and aspirations and how it fit into the mission statement. Fisher has taught me items of interest in many different aspects of business. Those attributes learned are what makes a majority of the success here. In retail you have to deal with HR problems, financial documents and many other areas to successfully run a business.
- Kirsten Scott
I really feel the mock interview is helpful in preparing for an actual interview. In fact, my mock interview was much harder then my actual interview. 630 was a very helpful class for this internship. I believe 499 (the presentation aspect, NOT the lecture) was the most helpful to me in this internship as we have a presentation in front of 150 people, including the CEO and Executive Board.
- Grace Diffenbacher
You have to have an open mind going into any internship.  This internship was not directly related to my major (Human Resources) but it did help me learn about the retail industry, and whether or not I would enjoy working in this particular environment.  Sometimes I was asked to jump in and help if a certain department was shorthanded; you never know what you’ll need to do. 
-  Nicole Lindberg    

Bullet Honda

Honda interns

Why did you choose to intern with this company?
I thought that it would be a really good experience. I have always heard good things about Honda, and also my aunt works at the Honda in Anna and I talked to her a lot about working here at Honda. I had a couple other offers too, but I would of had to relocate for them, and also the pay at Honda was better.
- Holly Boekman, Transportation and Logistics
What were your responsibilities?
This summer I have two major projects that I was scheduled to work on. The first project is on Cotton and Nylon gloves. The major goal on this project is to try and find the lowest cost on these two gloves, while still getting stable supply and maintaining the current quality that we are receiving now.
The second project is on Hand Tools. With this project I have 8 different categories of Hand Tools that are used throughout Honda of America, and I am trying to standardize these 8 categories. This project is about a two year project, but I am gathering all the data together and then am going to begin to look at one of the 8 categories to try and get one category standardized. I also have to give three presentations through out my co-op here. I have already given one presentation, and I have two more during these last five weeks I am here.
- Holly Boekman, Transportation and Logistics
What was the most important thing you learned?
My experience at Honda so far has been a really good experience. I have not learned one specific thing but I have gained a lot of skills from working at Honda. I have had the chance to deal with suppliers and work with them throughout the projects I am doing, and also working with all my co-workers has been great experience in enhancing my communications skills. One other main thing that I have learned is a lot more about networking. I have had to go out and find information and also find what people to talk to and where to find them.
- Holly Boekman, Transportation and Logistics

Bullet Johnson & Johnson

Matt Roten

What Did You Do?

I worked at Johnson & Johnson World Headquarters as a Corporate Finance Co-op supporting World-Wide Procurement. I was responsible for managing and implementing process improvements to J&J's internal Domestic & International Employee Relocation process. At the end of the quarter, I had the opportunity to prepare and present my quarterly results to upper management as well as the Vice President of Headquarters Finance.

What advice do you have?

Get involved in a leadership position in an on-campus organization. The leadership experience you will gain can help you effectively reply to employers' interview questions. Take advantage of every opportunity to practice your public speaking and interview skills, especially in classes such as Bus. Administration 499 and the Fisher QUIC program. During your internship, make it a priority to genuinely network with colleagues and management who have positions or prior work experience(s) which interest you. Networking will help you gain valuable insight while simultaneously setting yourself apart from others.

Heidi Otto

What Did You Do?

I worked in the MD&D sector of Johnson & Johnson, DePuy, but specifically in the Neurosurgical and Neurovascular company, Codman. One of our group intern projects was to analyze a company for a mock acquisition and present it to finance directors and New Business Development team members.

What Did You Learn?

The most important thing I learned from working at Johnson & Johnson is that a person doesn't have to know everything before a job, he or she just needs to be able to adapt and learn quickly in a fast-paced environment.

Preparation for success..

I believe the most critical factors in preparing me to succeed in my internship were the presentational skills I Iearned from 499 and my technical skills I learned from 211, 212, 620, and previous internships.

Zlatina Ivanova

What Did You Do?

One of my major projects was initiating capital project closeouts. I worked with project leads to closeout open liabilities and complete capital closure forms to ensure depreciation and financials are compliant. Another important project I had is working on a physical inventory count.Other smaller projects include second quarter close responsibilities, budget ownership, and assisting with the 2012 Business Plan. 

What Did You Learn?

The importance of communication and confidence, you have to be willing to take risks and work independently. There was a lot of ambiguity with my projects and daily tasks and you have to take advantage of resources other than your supervisor in order to complete them. Also networking with business partners and/or directors is very important in order to get your name out there. Being involved beyond just work is really important and gives you the opportunity to build great relationships.

Bullet JPMorgan Chase

Students at Chase

Maria Thomas

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I worked in Global Finance Operations as an intern in the Operations Analyst Development Program. Our team’s primary focus was project management, something I wasn’t expecting to be involved in at a financial institution. My project dealt with the implementation of two new consolidation reporting tools that are used by the different Lines of Businesses (Investment Bank, Asset Management, Card Services, etc.) to report their profitability up to Corporate Financial Reporting, who reports that information to the world as publically held information. I learned about the Project Life Cycle (something I’d suggest you get familiar with it, it’s a great process to know!), and mainly participated  in the testing phase, so I loaded test cases to the testing manager, administered the correct accesses needed by testers to testing environments, and verified the applications were configured according to the requests of the client. It was an interesting department to work in, since our clients were other JP Morgan employees rather than users of JP Morgan services.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The importance of making a memorable impact on the people around you, from your direct manager, to upper management, and even your fellow interns. People talk, and when a new position opens up in the company, managers will often ask around for recommendations from internal employees. Many times, if there's an open position, anyone can apply, but it normally goes to that person who made a positive connection earlier with someone involved in the decision process. Networking doesn't stop after you get your first job, so anywhere you go, always be thinking of what the personal brand impression are you leaving with the people you meet. So how do you do this during your internship? Ask your manager of recommendations of people to speak to, set up coffee meetings with speakers your program brings in, smile, start small talk with people in the kitchen in the office, triple check the work you do before you submit it, introduce yourself to members of your team and consistently check in with them asking if there’s anything small you can help them with. All these are things to help build a brand for yourself in the company.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

You learn a lot from your organizational involvement. The more organizations you’re involved in, and the greater variety of them, the more you’ll pick up and sharpen those skills. Organizational involvement helped me realize what the components of a successful team are and how that varies between teams with different objectives. I also learned how to maintain positive relationships amongst different groups of people. Many times I didn’t know how to figure out a problem in my current project, but I felt comfortable asking around to my fellow interns since I made friendships with them at the beginning of the internship. As the Communications Chair for the Indian American Association in the past year, I learned to draft clear, brief, and professional emails, and also learned how to convey tone electronically. Two of the skills I’ve learned most as a leader are to own up to your mistakes or shortcomings, and to help out wherever you can. The first is one maintains trust amongst your group and shows your commitment to continuously improve. Always help out, and never think your position in something exempts you from doing some work. People take note on if you’re the type of leader who holds themselves above the team, or considers themselves as an equal member.

Megan Kirby

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer. 

  • Created a work flow of the critical functions and how they connect within the Program Office team (my department in marketing) that can be useful for new employees, future interns, and for employees covering other employee either on vacation or out of the office
  • Improved the service to our branches by aligning collateral inventory production to branch usage.  Accomplished this by tracking and analyzing current trends and forecasting future demand.
  • Observed and developed a stronger understanding of how JPMC manages risk within the Marketing department by assisting in a desk audit and conducting an audit of an Employee Access databases
  • Developed and presented trend analysis of Marketing issues and Problem Resolution Mitigations and presenting my findings at an Issues Action Meeting and an Auditing meeting
  • Supported the Marketing Spend and Governance Process. Compiled the deck of key documents used to execute the spend approval process for the Marketing department while an employee was on vacation
  • I also got a chance to do a final presentation about  all of the  projects I completed this summer for the entire Chase marketing dept.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

Listening and writing things down is important for the learning process. I learned something new about JP Morgan Chase everyday because it is such a large company that provides so many services and includes many different sectors. I learned that the main goal for JP Morgan Chase is customer experience and I’m sure this is true across many companies.

I improved my presentation, analytic, and computer skills when completing my tasks.

In addition to all the things I learned while completing my assignments and projects, I learned many great tips for success in the business world  for my future career- always be professional, network, respect your managers, take some risks, ask questions, ask for feedback, give quality work, and create a “Brand” for yourself that encompasses your best qualities.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

Making sure I researched and learned about both the company and the people I would be working with. It is very important to have a good first impression with every new employee you meet. This helps with networking and helps you succeed overall. To make a good impression it is important to look professional, ask questions, be attentive, and follow up, either by completing the assigned task or simply thanking someone for their time.

Additional Information:

This was my first internship experience. It has given me a lot of experience and prepared me for a future career. It changed my complete outlook on what a marketing department does and the work and time that must go into every project/program. It has also given me an opportunity to realize what I want to do after college. Although I am an accounting major, this marketing experience has given me more options. Working at JPMC was an awesome opportunity and maybe I will get a chance to continue working here in the future.

 

Bullet KeyBank

https://fisher.osu.edu/i/pb/images/12565/KeyBank.jpg

Kimberly Siegal

The most critical internship preparation factors for me were:

  • Past internships: I knew what to expect from an internship and how to approach it in the most constructive way.
  • Participation in Delta Sigma Pi, a co-ed professional business fraternity: The group helped me prepare for the professional world.
  • Academic focus: If you work hard in school, the work ethic and attitude will naturally transfer into the workplace.

Navi Kang

To answer your question on what was the most critical factor in helping me succeed at my internship - I would have to say the Fisher Futures program. The program offered me an opportunity to get exposed to investment banking early on in my career. For example, I applied to the program in February of my sophomore year and the summer before my junior year I was already reading books on the industry, writing articles on important market events, and getting exposed to the modeling side of banking. I also had a chance to make trips to New York and Chicago, where I was able to meet people in the industry and get an idea of the hard work it took to get there. Overall, I came out understanding it was an industry full of bright, hard-working, motivated, and business savvy people that were looking for a challenging and rewarding career. Being aware of all this, I knew I had to be sharp analytically, detail oriented, an effective communicator, know the markets well, and be someone that people good see as someone fun to work with. To summarize, the overall thoroughness and preparation the Futures program provides, was the most critical factor that allowed me to succeed at my internship at Keybanc.

Bullet Limited Brands

Coca-Cola internsBriefly describe your major project(s) over the summer

This summer I have been involved in three main projects.  I supported the implementation of cross docking in my distribution center, developed a 5S project in the reverse logistics work area, and helped to develop action items for the Inbound group from the LimitedBrands Associate Opinion Survey.  I also supported all Inbound functions on a daily basis.
- Jeff Eckinger

Domestic Team: Made color coded maps of the US to show transit times and rates based on location and assembled schedules for an air freight pilot and also compared their rates with those from our network and Fed Ex.
International: Made a database in Access for Ocean Rates. Helps the team compare and view all of the rates. I also updated a transit matrix to show the number of days in transit the freight takes from various ports.
- Amy Miller

My major project this summer was to develop training material to teach supervisors, group leads, and associates a new functional flow process within the distribution center.  The materials included vendor coordination, receiving, reserve, value added services, and waving functions for both new hires as well as associates transitioning to the upgraded warehouse management system. 
- Kevin Joseph

My major project this summer was filling in for one of my team members who moved to another area right after I arrived by doing his reporting and analysis, and working with a system that helps to optimize our supply chain by looking at capacities and costs across our vendors, distribution centers, and stores.
- Eric Kirwen

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing that I learned from this internship is how to accommodate a diverse range of personalities in a large group of associates and leverage my own experiences and personality in order to accomplish projects through associate support.
- Jeff Eckinger

I learned you have to be outgoing and aggressive to learn and make an impression.  Everyone is so nice and willing to help so you have to use that to gain the most from your time with them. Ten weeks goes really fast. Sorry to say, but CS&E is also a really important class and you should take more of them if possible. It is really beneficial.
- Amy Miller

The most important thing that I learned from my internship is that it is necessary to always be prepared and it is important to develop relationships with co-workers.
- Kevin Joseph

The most important thing is the ability to work cross functionally. You will not always be working on projects with people who have the same functional knowledge as you do. Being able to communicate what you are doing with people who might not understand your project is crucial.
- Eric Kirwen

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

I think that the most important factor in preparing for success in an internship, as well as any job, is to go into the opportunity with an understanding of what expectations of you are.  From there you must have the mindset that you are going to exceed those expectations.  In my experience it is effective to sit down with your manager on day one and define what it is they want to see from you in the internship. You then have a baseline of what you need to exceed from.
- Jeff Eckinger

Being involved in AMA helped me be outgoing and helped demonstrate my leadership skills, CS&E helped with my projects throughout the summer (Excel and Access are crucial tools), and going through the QUICK program helped me prepare for the interview process.
- Amy Miller

One of the most critical factors that prepared me for this internship was working on group projects in school in which we had to develop our own clear direction in order to solve problems.  Paying attention in class was also helpful in understanding how different aspects of business work.
- Kevin Joseph

I think the thing that prepared me most for my internship was working in groups in all of my different classes. It is not too much different from working in the real world, other than it’s not difficult to get everyone to meet on time. But, many of the other problems are the same, differing viewpoints, etc.
- Eric Kirwen

Bullet Macy's

Sherwin Williams - Megan HoldrenBriefly describe your major project(s) over the summer
During my internship with Macy's, I was assigned 5 major projects that involved different aspects of the business. We were to track our results using different reporting measures over the course of the internship. For example, I would be assigned to increase sales penetration of a poorly performing group of items using marketing and merchandising techniques and then measure sales penetration for the rest of the program. The next week, I would begin a second project working on selling techniques with one of my associates and track her sales. The 5 projects stacked on top of each other so that by the end of the internship I was juggling 5 projects simultaneously.
- Kathryn Edwards

I was responsible for analyzing sales trends in the men's department. Through studying these trends I selected a brand that we had a major opportunity to increase sales. Over the next few weeks I educated my associates using product knowledge to help increase their ability to sell the product. My associates and I also re-merchandised the area in hopes to draw attention to certain products we wanted to sell more successfully. I also had many additional small projects I completed during my internship
- Sean Gartland
What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?
Although my previous summer jobs had been in retail, I had yet to be on the management end of the business. I quickly learned that things are constantly changing and that you really have to be flexible in order to be successful in retail. I'm naturally a scheduler, so it was hard for me to put down a project I was right in the middle of to respond to a guest issue. I had to adjust my personal style in order to fit the demands of the role, and I'm sure that will be true at any company.
- Kathryn Edwards

The most valuable thing I learned was how to successfully manage a team of over ten associates. It is a skill that cannot be taught, one has to experience leading a team first hand. It was interesting to coach and direct people that were over twice my age, especially because they have far more experience than I do in retail. The best advice I could give to someone who was put into a similar situation would be to not jump into it to fast. It is important to gain the respect your employees as well as understand them.
- Sean Gartland
What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?
I think it's vitally important to keep in contact with the corporation, if only just to touch base to see where your resume is in the hiring process. When visiting NYC with the Business Scholars program, I met marketers with Macy's and kept in contact with them. I got this internship by keeping in touch with those contacts. Periodic communication shows genuine interest in the company.
- Kathryn Edwards
One thing that helped prepare me for success was former work experience. I had never worked in retail before, but the experience of communicating with supervisors was great to have. My supervisors at Macy's were very impressed with my ability and eagerness to approach them with questions and ideas.
- Sean Gartland

Bullet Nestle

Students at Nestle

Aakanksha Marwah

Briefly describe your major project over the summer.

My main project this Summer has been to analyze the Value Stream for Inbound Materials, specifically broccoli, in the Prepared Foods Division of Nestle. Broccoli has a long lead time as it is imported from Mexico, Guatemala, and Ecuador, which causes it to have a high inventory at Nestle factories and warehouses. The primary objective of this project is to reduce the lead time for broccoli, in turn, reducing inventory levels and working capital. A few of my tasks in this project were to create current state value stream maps for our two largest suppliers, analyze delivery and consumption patterns for broccoli, analyze effects of forecasting accuracy and production changes on inventory levels, identify several works-streams to reduce the lead time, and create future state value stream maps. The various work-streams allowed me to better understand international transportation modes, warehousing options, food quality requirements, and supplier relationship management.     

 What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

My favorite part of this project has been that I am able to interact with people from each step of the Inbound Material value stream. I have worked with groups from Supply Chain, Procurement, Factory Engineering & Operations, Research & Development, Marketing, and even external suppliers. In a company as large as Nestle, I found that each group has different objectives and priorities, which often cause overall organizational goal alignment to be a challenge. As part of the Strategic Planning team which focuses on the entire value chain, I was able to see the importance of focusing on the overall results, rather than individual operational silos’ success. This, however, makes the work extremely challenging! With so many divisions and roles in such a large company, there are very few people that have an in-depth understanding of the complete organization. My most important learning from this project is that when starting in any new organization, take the time to understand the objectives and understanding of other roles. You never gain appreciation for someone else’s work unless you are able to put yourself in their shoes!

 What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

My operations and logistics management coursework has been extremely helpful in having a basic understanding of the field terminology and concepts. Having a previous co-op in a similar field was also extremely helpful, as I now understand many of the different operations of a manufacturing company.

George Vourvopoulos

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

Nestle has the goal of becoming a Lean organization by the year 2015. In accordance to lean thinking, appropriate lead times allow scheduled production to run smoothly and effectively. One of my two main projects was the reduction of lead times from ingredient vendors. My second major project included working on ten different product development teams. During my internship I had the opportunity to participate on two innovation projects as the procurement lead.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important things that I will take away is how key communication is in every aspect of business, how essential pleasing your stakeholders is, and building strong long-lasting relationships with vendors and co-workers. I’ve seen each of these demonstrated at Nestle and when they all come together you see success within procurement.

 What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

The most critical factor in preparing to succeed at my internship was the research I did on Nestlé prior to my interview and after my internship acceptance. By understanding the organization and its culture, specifically the procurement division, I was able to jump right into my internship and avoid the first hurdle of learning how the business operates.

Bullet Owens Corning

Owens Corning groupBriefly describe your projects.
My main project this summer involved moving over 900 intranet websites from one server to another server. This project was very challenging. It involved keeping very good detailed records, communicating with internal customers, and working with a team. Also, another project I did involved updating the HTML code on an internal intranet website.
- Chris Doyle
What's your advice for other students?
Network yourself through your parents, your friends' parents, and your parent's friends. If they respect you or your parents (if they respect your parents, they transfer that respect onto you), it will pave the way for a relaxed interview and will help you get the job. Chances are they know you or your parents better than anyone they get to know in an interview.
- Derek Bell
What's the most important thing you learned?
With multiple projects to handle, I learned how to manage my time better and having to prioritize my projects to meet the specific deadlines. Also how to be more effective by keeping open communication with co-workers and to ask questions because their is so much you can learn by asking others questions and learing the right questions to ask.
- Krissy Robinson

Bullet PNC Bank

Erik Patchell

What Did You Do?

My internship this summer was in the acquired loan accounting group. I created and maintained a management dashboard which kept track of all the tasks my group needed to complete and the date they were completed. I also conducted a competitor analysis of acquired loan disclosures which combed through competitors’ financial statements and earnings releases to determine the most straightforward method of disclosing acquired loan information to investors.

What Did You Learn?

The most important thing I learned this summer at PNC is what a great manager looks like.  I was fortunate to work under one of the most charismatic and empathetic managers at PNC.  After watching her, I realize the importance of building trust with subordinates and making sure employees maintain a work-life balance.

Preparation for success..

I think the most critical factor in preparing me to succeed at my internship was the ability to be flexible.  For the first few weeks, things were very quiet.  Then PNC announced plans to purchase the American segment of the Royal Bank of Canada and acquire its $15.7 billion loan portfolio.  Things got incredibly hectic for the group after this and didn’t let up all summer.  It was important to be able to adjust to the sudden change in my responsibilities and work environment.

 Julie Heigel

What Did You Do?

My primary responsibilities this summer with the commercial segment at PNC entailed supporting Relationship Managers with prospecting, researching and prescreening companies in the Chicago market with annual revenue between $10-50 million. The largest transaction that I supported this summer was a deal for a petroleum company.  The borrowers were requesting a $30 million credit facility to maintain not only their operating entity but also their numerous real estate entities.  The deal involved two large trusts, 70 gas stations, and a separate shopping mall that served as additional collateral.  My role in this complex transaction was to analyze tax returns, financial statements ownership percentage documents to determine global cash flows and outline the preliminary prescreen document.  

What Did You Learn?

The most important thing I learned this summer was the value of a strong relationship and effective communication with not only your clients, but also the product partners within the Bank.  When a Relationship Manager goes to market, it is integral to present the Bank as a whole and not just the credit portion.  This requires efficient teamwork with partners like treasury management, capital markets and asset management.  

Preparation for success..

The most critical factor in preparing to succeed at PNC was strengthening my communication skills.  PNC refers to underwriting, credit, and the relationship managers collectively as a “Deal Team.”  In order to bring a deal from prospect to closing in a timely manner, this “Deal Team” must maintain a constant stream of communication. 

 

Bullet Procter & Gamble

Matt Hokes

 

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

 This summer, I worked on about five main projects, with the end goal of being able to present recommendations to senior management at the end of my internship.  One of the main projects I worked on was an analysis of a change to the payment terms given to our customers.  Through working on this project, I collaborated with both global and regional customer team contacts to model the financial, legal, and trade relational impacts that a possible change could have on the business.  A second project that I was involved in was analyzing the future of sustainability at P&G through the FAST program.  Along with another six interns from various majors/functions, our group developed ideas and prototypes for sustainable innovations to position the business for the future and we were able to present our ideas and recommendations directly to our CEO at the end of the project.  Lastly, I also worked on a project analyzing and strengthening our internal controls procedures for the trade spending department as well as improving the corresponding audit process. 

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

One of the most important things I felt I learned from my internship was learning how to “navigate” the corporate network.  Other than just general networking, this also included being able to leverage the large number and variety of available resources in order to achieve results,  as well as working closely with managers and upper management to understand their strategic goals and to ensure alignment on recommendations.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

I would have to say the most important factor in preparing me for success at my internship was developing strong conversation/people/presentation skills.  A lot of my work hinged on knowing how to get the information I needed from available resources and then being able to take this information and share it in a clear, succinct manner to gain approval from management.  

Bullet PwC

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Shane Ross

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

I was in a specialty assurance group called PCS (Private Company Services); in short, we do audits for smaller, private, companies. Thus, I did not have a major project over the summer, but rather many smaller projects that were pieces of audits for different companies. I performed fixed asset testing, revenue testing, as well as debt testing - each of these was to provide assurance that the companies did their accounting correctly in the respective financial statement areas.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing that I learned from the internship was that there are so many different jobs/groups/aspects of the business world to partake in and I want to try as many of them as possible until I find the best "fit" for me. And on a side note, I also noticed that the CS&E class all business majors have to take is actually one of the most useful classes in college and having good excel skills can really accelerate your promotion in the workforce.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

The most critical factor that prepared me to succeed at my internship was the ability to work hard and reason through things, which includes being a fast-learner. Coming in, I was extremely nervous that I wouldn't know anything. But, everyone in the work-place is extremely understanding of the fact that college students do not know much about business in the real world; they are willing to help and guide you as much as you need as long as you are willing to work hard to understand what they teach you and make a strong effort to figure things out on your own before running for help. Also, having a positive attitude goes a much longer way than some may think.

Sean Fisher

 Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

Over the summer, I had the opportunity to audit a major investment company who holds over $275 billion in assets. Throughout the year, the company has multiple year-end financial statements that it releases for the different securities that it holds. I worked on an engagement team with 14 others to audit the closed end funds, swaps, and bonds that this company holds. I had the opportunity to view the company's financial statements compare them with the corresponding bank statements and other relevant documents to ensure that the numbers they reported were accurate so that investors had reliable information when deciding whether or not to make an investment in the company.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned from this internship was to ask questions. As interns, we're not expected to know everything. A lot of times, you don't want to ask a question because you think it might be dumb, and you don't want to bother another team member. But, the employees I worked with understood this and were more than happy to answer any questions I had. The answers to my questions not only helped to save a lot of time, but also helped me to understand more about what I was doing and why it was necessary, so that the next time I had a question, I might not need to ask it anymore.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

The most important factor in preparing me to succeed at PwC was the preparation we have in Fisher working with groups. The public accounting field relies heavily on working with teams, and the classes we take at Ohio State that involve group work were very helpful in preparing me to work with teams this summer. It's not uncommon to jump from team to team, and a lot of times, you don't know everyone on the team. It's important to learn how to work with others to get the assignment completed. Ohio State has done a great job in preparing me to do this.

Kaitlyn Kisiday

 Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

This summer, I had the opportunity to start, and complete a federal and state tax returns.  At the start of the project, our team would convert the client’s book in come to tax income, and then take any deductions from there.  After calculation the correct taxable income, we transferred those numbers to the actual tax returns.  I was extremely excited with the partner signed the final return at the end of the summer. 

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

Work did not always come directly to me.  If I finished my assigned work early, my supervisors were not always on top of me to give me the next assignment.  I learned how to move to the next step in the projects on my own.  If I was not able to move on to the next part, then I would ask my peers, team members, and even the supervisors for more work.  Proactively seeking working and being willing to help others made me a better asset to my teams.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

Being organized and using good communication skills on a daily basis allowed me to be a better intern.  Because I was organized, I always knew where my files and projects were in the database, and my team members could rely on me to find and retrieve those files at any time.  Communication is equally important in the accounting environment.  Knowing when and how to ask questions, and then understand the answer, you can save yourself and your team time by working faster.  Having good communication skills is also about understanding.  This helped me build relationships within my group and learn the firm culture.

 

Bullet Saks Fifth Avenue

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Elizabeth Harter

 Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

This past summer I was an intern in the American Couture, Designer Evening, and Bridal Buying Office in New York City. My position involved compiling financial information each week, going to market to help select assortments, meeting with designers and their teams, and overall, making decisions that helped the business grow. I also created an iPad "app" that was designed to increase sales and improve the customer experience in the New York and Beverly Hills Bridal Salons. 

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

Always look for the next project or the next step. If you're not busy with work, either volunteer to help your teammates or challenge yourself to improve a process. Continuous improvement and innovation are two of the best ways to stand out in any career. 

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

There were many factors that prepared me to succeed this summer. My leadership experiences taught me how to communicate well with others and how to multitask. The Honors Cohort Program gave me a fundamental understanding of the business. And the Career Services Office provided me with the basic internship expectations and etiquette that were noticed by my supervisor. 

Taylor Mandel

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

This summer I worked as a buying intern in cosmetics. My main project this summer was to create a Major Launch Recap of top selling products with revenue of near one million dollars. I had to first find out which products were top sellers and then collect data on their selling information. I also managed the calendar for events at the New York flagship with goals over five thousand dollars. This involved me contacting and communicating with all of Saks Fifth Avenue’s beauty vendors. Perhaps the most creative project I worked on over the summer was on an iPhone app. I helped generate ideas for additions to existing app, which were later presented, to top management.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned from my internship is the importance of communicating with your team.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

I truly believe that the professionalism of the every day environment at the Fisher College of Business taught me how to behave and present myself in the work place.  I learned this through the every day classroom experience and the office of career management QUIC process.

Alexa Holzworth

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

There were three major projects that I was involved in over the summer. First, every year, Saks Fifth Avenue holds a Key to the Cure Event (includes a dinner, fashion show, and in-store shopping event), which raises money to benefit breast cancer research. It was my responsibility to get the contact information of the CEO or President for the 75 vendors that my department, Men’s Contemporary, worked with in order to invite them to the Key to the Cure Event. This required frequent email correspondence with vendors and an organized spreadsheet of the information. Second, it was my responsibility to input the Fall 2012 Purchase Orders into the system. This required me to learn the ins and outs of the system and ensure accuracy and efficiency while inputting the orders. Finally, it was my responsibility to prepare market research for my team to help them gain an understanding of past trends. This included pulling selling reports, analyzing receipts vs. sold, and printing pictures of successful styles. This helped them get a view of what styles were selling well and what styles would “work” the best in future seasons. In addition to these three major areas, I contributed towards the team by inputting markdowns into the system, going to market appointments, and pulling reports.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing that I learned from my internship is that working with a team is more beneficial than working as an individual. From the beginning, I formed strong relationships with my supervisor and the three other members of my team. This allowed me to have open lines of communication when I had an idea, questions, or a problem that needed solved.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

The most critical factor in preparing me to succeed at my internship was the curriculum and the outstanding professors that we have at the Fisher College of Business. From the very beginning, the students from Ohio State had the upper hand because we had a strong grasp of business skills. From quickly learning the computer systems, to something as simple as communicating effectively over the phone and through email, we were able to jump right in and contribute to the team.

Bullet Scotts

What did you do?

Scotts internsAs a finance intern, I helped prepare for a new regionalization initiative that the company is kicking off.  I completed a detailed financial analysis of the company's regional sales to provide to the new regional finance teams as they transition into the new operating model. - Lisa Snyder

Scotts was told by the Environmental Protection Agency to stop producing certain lawn care products,  because of "bad labels." (Improper wordage, application directions, etc)  My project was to create and implement a tracker for all of the violative registrations. - Paul Sobecki

During my time at Scotts, the major project I worked on was completing tax returns. I prepared and filed numerous tax returns including hand-written municipal returns as well as electronic state returns. I also filed single entity returns as well as consolidated returns. - Kyle Dicke

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned during my internship is how crucial it is to be able to communicate in a professional manner. I had to write letters to government officials and speak with executives and I found it very important to communicate professionally and speak clearly in order to get my point across. - Kyle Dicke

Although the formulas and theories we learn in finance classes are important, nothing matches real-world experience when preparing for a career.  Finance in a bigger company is about flexibility - a balance between being fast-paced and detail-oriented.  - Lisa Snyder

Being an effective communicator, or communicating what you are looking for in a clear and concise manner
is more important in the workplace than technical skills. Communication allows you to finish tasks quickly
and can also create invaluable friendships in the workplace. - Rachael Gaser 

What was the most critical factor preparing you to succeed?

Coming in with an open mind and a willingness to try anything that is put in front of you. - Lee Jones

Being able to think with a scientific thought process enabled me to manage my time effectively and constantly look for ways  to improve existing processes. - Rachael Gaser

Since each company prepares financial statements
or conducts financial analyses a little differently, it wasn't the technical skills I learned in class that made me feel most prepared to succeed.  What really gave me confidence was knowing that, at Fisher, I've learned how to act in a professional environment. 
I think this can easily make you stand out during an internship. - Lisa Snyder

Bullet Shell

Shell interns

What were your responsibilities?
Global Contract Review Board Process Assurance Evaluation--I looked at contracts that were approved by the Board and followed up with them to see that they were carried out as they were supposed to be.
- Kathryn Conrad
Creating a series of attitude surveys for interns in regards to the intern events hosted by Recruitment. Making recommendations that will improve the candidate screening process and bring quality candidates through Shell’s recruitment process.
- Rachel Peskowitz
Inbound Freight Payments Process - I created current state maps of the processes currently in place for how freight is added on and subsequently paid for on MRO Purchase Orders for all of the US refineries and for each Line of Business in Shell, then worked with a Global standardization team to create a fit for purpose model to be implemented in all the Downstream Shell Businesses.
- Isaac Elking
What was the most important thing you learned?
I learned that in a large company, relationships are everything. In order to be successful, you must establish solid relationships with hundreds of employees in order to efficiently and effectively complete your job. Also, in human resources, it is vital to understand the business in order to effectively help your client groups.
- Tyler Shepfer
I learned that being flexible is important. Your plans and projects are likely to change as you go, and you need to be open to it or you will not be as successful. I have also been able to get a better idea of what I value in an employer.
- Rachel Peskowitz
I learned how to work a business project from beginning to end, and in doing so how to manage the conflicts that arise when you have to fulfill process standardization, business impact, and real life implementation requirements that must be practical and effective across five different categories of business.
- Isaac Elking
What advice would you give?
I would say that you should make sure to be involved on campus. It is a major benefit when you go into an interview and can discuss scenarios when you've acted as a leader and worked in teams with people who have different opinions and views than you toward a common goal - something that many campus organizations give you an opportunity to do. It will also help prepare you to work with the wide variety of people you'll encounter in today's globalizing world.
- Isaac Elking
Look for a company that has an internship program like Shell's: here we have a supervisor, mentor, official Shell Buddy, and organized intern events to keep us involved in the company.
- Kathryn Conrad

Bullet Sherwin Williams

Sherwin Williams - Megan HoldrenBriefly describe your major project(s) over the summer
The major project/goal that was given to me this summer, was to find ways to increase our D.I.Y. accounts or "Do It Yourself" customers. For this project I was given a data base of all of our D.I.Y. customers for our store. I then used that contact list to call on customers to inform them of our up and coming sales and promotions.
- Megan Holdren
What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?
The most important thing that I have learned from my internship is patience as well as ways to improve my people skills in order to be more customer friendly.
- Megan Holdren
What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?
Taking Business Administration 501 [now BA2601] was very helpful in the whole internship process because it gave me that extra jump start that I needed.
It also taught me great interviewing skills as well as ways to improve my resume, which I ultimately feel helped me land the internship.
- Megan Holdren

Bullet Starbucks

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Kevin Horstman

Briefly describe your major project over the summer.

This summer I was the Global Supply Chain intern in planning, improvement and analytics at Starbucks.  My projects over the summer were to create a map of the metrics currently being kept track of across the supply chain, as well as the owners and sources of those metrics.  I was then to make recommendations on an executive dashboard, used to assess supply chain health from month to month. 

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned during my time at Starbucks is that research needs to matched up to the needs of the organization.  Sometimes what is said in research needs to built upon in order to be useful in the business. 

What do you think was the most critical factor in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

The most critical factors in preparing me for this internship would have to be the work ethic my parents instilled in me when I was young, as well as the speaking and management skills I acquired during my past internship with College Works Painting.  I learned a lot and am very happy with my experience at Starbucks. 

Alec Simon

Briefly describe your major project over the summer.

I worked on 3 major projects throughout the course of the summer, the first being an entitlement cost model for LTL shipping.  An entitlement cost model is essentially what it should cost for carriers to move our shipments, and I took a previously built model and updated it for better accuracy, and then created a model that allows Starbucks to know the entitlement cost of any shipment, by carrier, at an instant.  I also worked on a fuel consumption model that attempts to determine how much fuel Starbucks is responsible for using in LTL.  Finally, I worked on a natural gas project where I assessed the feasibility of using natural gas in our network as a transportation fuel.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

For me the most important thing that I learned was the process that goes into a project and how much time and work it takes to get a project from start to finish.  I also learned a lot about how important it is to work with people, and how important it is to develop relationships, both personal and professional, to being successful.

What do you think was the most critical factor in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

I think the most critical factor in preparing to succeed was being able to act professionally.  At a large organization, with a set corporate culture, being able to acclimate to that culture is incredibly important

Bullet Stryker

Stryker internsWhat were your responsibilities?
As a Marketing intern I was a member of the team that launched a new medical LCD monitor. Prior to the launch, I traveled extensively around the country to watch the monitor in surgery and interact both with the sales force and surgeons in the OR. I attended the Mid-Year Sales Meeting in Chicago and performed short presentations as well as distributed an educational CD I had created. The Vision Elect had different dimensions than previous monitors and required a new monitor cover design. I interacted with engineers, sales representatives, and vendors to launch the new product by the end of my internship.
- Caitlin Clark
What did you learn?
The most important things I learned were what it is actually like to be working in the “real world”. There is no class or lecture that can ever teach you the experience of working with a company — large or small — and how operating as a member of a business actually works. I have also seen several of the topics which I studied in school “in action” which helps cement what I have been studying all my years at Ohio State.
- Stephanie Wiseman
Here at Stryker, everyone is willing to help. Taking the initiative to ask for help, and meet many co-workers – this has been my main form of networking. It is important to network, network, network!!!
- Leanne Cheng
What advice do you have for others Fisher students?
Find a place that fits you! You will not be happy if you don’t find a place where you are invested and interested in the work you are doing — that is so important! Another piece of advice is that finding an internship is not easy — you really do need to look around and apply to several different places. Giving yourself options along with having the experience of being rejected and accepted will really prepare you for so much. Lastly — work hard! Find a place that will challenge you. Use the time to actually learn and develop yourself. Not only will your experience be more valuable, but you will come out a better business person because of it.
- Stephanie Wiseman

Bullet Target

Target intern Malika KanodiaWhy did you choose to intern at this company?
I chose to intern at Target Corporation because I wanted to see how a successful, growing company operates. I was very impressed the company organization; I was assigned my mentor, manager, and given details of my projects months before I actually started interning. Also, I wanted to work for a company who was geared towards making my internship a positive learning experience.
- Malika Kanodia
What were your responsibilities?
I was given three projects to complete. The first was to create and update my department’s Online Reference Tool- a detailed website which documents all of the processes my department does. My second project was to create an access database which allows the department to do their yearly goal, monthly forecasting, accrual reviews, and percent rent paid to landlords more efficiently and effectively. My last project was to identify which Target stores had the greatest variances in their estimated vs. actual expenses, come up with a solution as to why the variances occurred, and create a method to better forecast for in the future. I was responsible for presenting all three of these projects to my department and different finance directors.
- Malika Kanodia
My major project this summer has been to create a reader-friendly guide to what we call, "PTM Process." This guide will be used by team members to assist them in filling endcaps and aisles so that they are always looking full and never light. This process also helps get product out of the backroom and onto the shelves faster.
- Dean Wallace
Target intern Dean WallaceWhat is the most important thing you have learned?
During my 10-week internship, I learned that it’s extremely important to take advantage of everything. Go to company volunteer events, set-up informational meetings with individuals within the departments that interest you, go to training seminars, intern events, etc. Also equally important is your ability to think outside the box and take the initiative to solve problems; don’t be afraid to ask for help or question certain department processes.
- Malika Kanodia
The biggest thing I have learned this summer is what it really means to be a leader and lead a team. Before this internship I worked mostly hourly-wage jobs in restaurants where there was little, if any leadership skills required. Since I have been with Target, the biggest challenge has been to learn what it takes to be a leader, and to actually step up and be a leader for my team.
- Dean Wallace
What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?
The most critical factor in preparing me to succeed in my internship this summer has to be confidence. Since day one with Target I have had to learn a ton of new information. However, the big picture of this internship is not whether I am able to comprehend the information, it is whether I can apply the knowledge to develop myself as a leader for the company.
I have recieved feedback from my superiors and it was difficult to swallow at first, but the biggest thing that has helped me move forward is my own self-confidence. The confidence to take the feedback I have been given and use it to improve myself as a leader for Target.
- Dean Wallace

Bullet Unilever

Students at Unilever

Li Mei

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

Over the course of my Procurement Contact Flexibles Co-op with Unilever, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, I have had numerous projects that ranged from day-to-day activities as well as ongoing projects. At Unilever, we have a new system called USQS, and my role was to serve as a liaison between the supplier and a third party company to complete the necessary steps to become compliant. I’ve spoken with different suppliers every day and learned a lot about their company as well as the different businesses in which they operate. Another project that I took the team lead on is called Panorama; this was specifically for my director who resided in Singapore. I was in charge of facilitating conference calls with global managers worldwide to transfer artwork to third party print agencies. On a daily basis, I worked in SAP, the main system that Unilever utilizes to store supplier contracts and purchase order information. I retrieved data to create reports for monthly forecasting and researched the volumes and spend to strategically plan out future VIP cost savings and cost avoidance.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

My co-op has taught me that not only is it about what one may know, but it is about how one can strategically use their resources to minimize the time to achieve results and to maximize efficiency. My manager and mentor did not hold my hand; instead, I was encouraged to seek help from other co-workers, and this encouraged me to meet more people who are experts in certain areas. Although it may have seemed intimidating at first, I introduced myself to new coworkers and the occasional upper level management in the beginning of my co-op. This in return, allowed me to network and learn from them. Most importantly, I have established professional relationships that would later assist me in the co-op as well as for my future career.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

Being prepared is probably the most critical trait to success. For me, I have always held a high importance in being organized. This allows me to always keep on track and most importantly, be able to retract any documents or specific information in the most time efficient manner. Secondly, being able to uphold great communication skills is an essential asset. When I started at Unilever, I quickly found out that confidence is one of the best tools to succeed. It shows leadership, knowledge, and assertiveness, which in turn allows coworkers and suppliers to perceive me as more than just a temporary co-op, but someone who could hold a full time position at the company.

Courtney Thatch

Briefly describe your major project(s) over the summer.

This summer I had the opportunity to intern with Unilever Customer Development for the Walmart Team in Rogers, Arkansas. My main project this summer was working with personal care masterbrands (Dove, Suave, and Axe) analyzing sales performance and finding opportunities for growth focusing on the masterbrand pallet program. At the completion of my project I presented my findings and recommendations to the leadership team consisting of managers, directors, and vice presidents of Customer Development at the Unilever North American Headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

The most important thing I learned is how to work efficiently with cross-functional teams in a fast paced environment. My experiences this summer also helped me understand my strengths, passions, and aspirations which are valuable in shaping my future career goals.

What do you think was the most critical factor(s) in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

My time management skills, professionalism, and drive to succeed allowed me hit the ground running at Unilever.  In addition, my core business classes prepared me to meet the challenges and expectations of supporting a critical project in a demanding environment.

Bullet Western Reserve

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Corey Snyder

Briefly describe your major project over the summer.

I was involved in many projects while interning at Western Reserve Partners. None of my assignments were fake or made up. I was put on actual deal teams and worked as an analyst for the summer.

Most of my work consisted of putting together industry research and presentation materials for pitches and other active sell-side engagements. I also put together financial models for clients and participated in client meetings and calls.

What is the most important thing you learned from your internship?

Analysts spend a large percentage of their time checking for errors and making information presentable to senior management and clients. One thing that will be useful moving forward is understanding that there will always be errors and mistakes on everything you do. It is important to spend the time and effort to find those errors before the assignment reaches or boss, or (worst case scenario) the client. This will badly hurt your reputation as an analyst and the firms’ reputation.

I have also learned a great deal about how to be efficient in Excel and PowerPoint

What do you think was the most critical factor in preparing you to succeed at your internship?

In preparing for my summer internship, I found it quite helpful to talk to Fisher students who had also interned at an investment bank. It was very helpful to find a mentor and learn how to navigate a corporate environment. I also tried to sharpen my Excel skills in the months leading up to the internship. These skills were extremely helpful when first starting out.