From Internship to Senior Year

Transitioning back to school was easy for me, but I was extremely busy. I had to cut my internship a couple days short in order to be back for work at Ohio State helping the Early Arrival Program for incoming freshman. On my last day, Wednesday, August 16th, we had our final presentations in our intern project groups. We presented to over 60 people and then had lunch. Afterwards, we took pictures as a group and said our goodbyes.

Finance Interns in North Carolina
My Intern Project Group After Final Presentations

I drove back to the house I was staying in and finished packing and loading my things into my car with the help of my mom and her friend who flew in two nights before. We didn’t get back to Columbus until 11:30 PM that night, and I had to be at work at 8 AM the next morning. I worked the next few days and had one day of break before school started again. I was so busy during the past 3 weeks that I didn’t even have a chance to sit down and watch TV or Netflix. It wasn’t until this past weekend that I felt that I was able to catch up on school work, unpacking, and seeing friends. Thankfully I should not have that tight of a turn around again.

I had a great summer working for Cisco. About halfway through my internship I decided that if I were to receive a full-time offer, I would want it to be at the headquarter office in San Jose, California. I expressed this to my program manager in our weekly check-ins and told her the reasons why I felt this way. Last week I received a call with my offer to work with Cisco and I accepted! I am looking forward to starting my career in Silicon Valley and living in California, which is somewhere I never thought I would end up because it is so far away.

 

Looking back I had some great experiences this summer. I want to share a few funny stories, things I found cool at Cisco, and tips for your internship. I hope you have enjoyed reading!

-On my first day with my finance team I wore a cute new shirt I had bought. Upon getting out of my car, my roommate pointed out that the tag was still on the shirt. This tag was not any tag, it was a thick cardboard tag with a string attaching it to my shirt. We weren’t able to rip it off or get it off with my keys. I went into the break room in the office and couldn’t find any scissors. Then, I went to my desk where my manager introduced me to a guy on the team and I asked them if they knew where scissors were, to which they shook their heads. I explained my tag situation and the guy I just met said he had a pocket knife. So he sawed the tag of, to which I said “nice to meet you”.  Maybe it was embarrassing, but it was funny to us.

-Our office has automatic desks that go up and down to adjust to your height or if you want to stand and work. Our laptops are our computers and we take them home with us every day. We also don’t have assigned desks, though most people sit at the same desks every day. Free coffee and iced coffee became a great perk to have on the long work days when I needed a boost of energy.

-Having a roommate that has to go to work at the same time as you is great. One day my phone was constantly dying for no reason and it decided to die overnight leaving me without an alarm. My roommate knocked on my door five minutes before we were supposed to leave to check if I was up. Without her, who knows when I would have woken up that morning.

-During a Durham Bulls baseball game that all of Cisco finance was invited to, we got souvenir mason jars with our drinks. The game was so hot that we went to find shade, but I realized I forgot my mason jar. I went back to grab it and when I came up the stairs some first years in the rotational program asked what I was doing. I put my cup up to show them while saying I forgot my cup, but as I did that the last bits of my drink splashed out onto my face and shirt. We all laughed so hard, and it started an hour long conversation in which I got to know the first years better.  *If you are underage, never drink alcohol at a company event.

-Keep a running track of what you do and who you talk to during your internship, even down to the small things you think don’t mean anything. This will come in handy if you have an exit interview or an interview with another company. It also helps when you update your resume.

-Cisco has many creativity rooms that are filled with things from a golf putting room, to a TV room, to massage chairs. I definitely wish I took advantage of these more, but I was busy working!

Golf Room
Cabana Room
Lounge in the Cabana Room
Game Room

#tbt By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. –Benjamin Franklin

Written by Undergraduate Consultant, Marlina Frederick

Cliché, but true! Prior to an interview, it’s important that you prepare by conducting company research. How to Find a Job explains:

“It’s very natural for you to want to “drop everything and run,” getting there as fast as you can; but that’s the wrong thing to do. There’s work to be done before you make that call. First, if you haven’t found out facts you ought to know about the firm you hope to become associated with, do so before you call. Important facts are: (a) the business of the firm, (b) what goods they produce or sell, (c) the length of time they have been in business, (d) their financial rating, (e) the kind of job you are to apply for, (f) your qualifications for that job.”

If company research seems kind of overwhelming, remember that job seekers in the 50’s didn’t have the World Wide Web at their fingertips! Utilize the company’s website, online business journals, and company information databases like Hoover’s to help you learn about the company. For more information on how to conduct company research, check out our Company Research Guide. Happy researching!

#tbt Mirror, mirror, on the wall …

Some things haven’t changed since the 50’s. How to Find a Job reminds job seekers to check personal appearance before heading to an interview:

“Did you bathe? Is your hair neatly combed? Are you teeth brushed? Is your breath sweet? Are your fingernails clean? Are your shoes shined? Are your clothes neatly pressed? These may seem like rather personal questions, but you must remember that employers are—and have a right to be—extremely critical. If you are slovenly in appearance, they have good reason to believe that you will be slovenly in your work.”

Take a minute to check your appearance in the mirror (and maybe give yourself a quick pep-talk!) before heading off to an interview. Good luck!

#tbt Career Management Style: Let’s Get Personal (NOT).

Written by Undergraduate Consultant, Marlina Frederick

How to Find a Job

With recruitment season in full swing, our office is all business, all the time! In the midst of recruitment events, career fairs, and interviews we stumbled across this gem. How to Find a Job: A Plan that Works was published in 1950 and contains tips for job seekers. Believe it or not, some of the advice is still relevant! Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing some of our favorite throwbacks from this pamphlet and the do’s and don’t’s of the job search process. Enjoy!

IMG_3187

How to Find a Job recommends that in a “blind” letter of application, candidates provide certain personal data: “your age, whether married or single, whether you have children, whether you are in good health.” These qualities were thought to provide perspective employers with an understanding of the candidate’s character. For example: married, family man = reliable, responsible. Today, it is illegal for employers to ask you about your marital status, family life, or health. Volunteering information that employers are legally not allowed to ask for may put the recruiter in an uncomfortable position. When in doubt, DON’T get personal!