#tbt By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. –Benjamin Franklin

Written by Undergraduate Consultant, Marlina Frederick

Cliché, but true! Prior to an interview, it’s important that you prepare by conducting company research. How to Find a Job explains:

“It’s very natural for you to want to “drop everything and run,” getting there as fast as you can; but that’s the wrong thing to do. There’s work to be done before you make that call. First, if you haven’t found out facts you ought to know about the firm you hope to become associated with, do so before you call. Important facts are: (a) the business of the firm, (b) what goods they produce or sell, (c) the length of time they have been in business, (d) their financial rating, (e) the kind of job you are to apply for, (f) your qualifications for that job.”

If company research seems kind of overwhelming, remember that job seekers in the 50’s didn’t have the World Wide Web at their fingertips! Utilize the company’s website, online business journals, and company information databases like Hoover’s to help you learn about the company. For more information on how to conduct company research, check out our Company Research Guide. Happy researching!

#tbt Mirror, mirror, on the wall …

Some things haven’t changed since the 50’s. How to Find a Job reminds job seekers to check personal appearance before heading to an interview:

“Did you bathe? Is your hair neatly combed? Are you teeth brushed? Is your breath sweet? Are your fingernails clean? Are your shoes shined? Are your clothes neatly pressed? These may seem like rather personal questions, but you must remember that employers are—and have a right to be—extremely critical. If you are slovenly in appearance, they have good reason to believe that you will be slovenly in your work.”

Take a minute to check your appearance in the mirror (and maybe give yourself a quick pep-talk!) before heading off to an interview. Good luck!

Tip Tuesday: 5 Reasons to Use FCDC

Written by Margie Bogenschutz, Senior Director of Undergraduate Career Management and Recruitment

You probably want to know what FCDC is, before learning about why you should use it! Fisher Career Data Central is a platform for collecting data from students about their job and internship offers, plans for graduate school and more. AND – it provides YOU with a lot of good information to use for your own job/internship search. Here are 5 reasons to use FCDC:

1) You can find average salary data on former Fisher students in your major – see what students in your major averaged in the past year, or 3 years or 5 years. Using last year’s class salary data could be helpful for you to determine realistic expectations about competitive salaries for your own job search.

2) You can find average internship salary data for your major from previous Fisher students.

3) You can learn what the top companies are that hired Fisher students in your major over the last several years. This can be helpful for targeting companies that have a rich history of hiring students in your major.

4) You can get geographic information about both job and internship offers from previous Fisher classes – learn where most Fisher students landed with their jobs and internships.

5) You can report your own internship and/or job – or other post-graduation plans – and help future Fisher students!

To learn more about FCDC and how to use it, go to:


5 Extra Tips After the Fair!

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair 2015

  1. Discover the company you love won’t hire a freshman or sophomore for their summer internship positions? Find an alumni contact from LinkedIn or the Office of Career Management to help you land a shadowing.
  2. Even if it won’t help you at this career fair, you still have the Fisher Spring Internship & Job Fair 2016, so make sure you are involved outside your school work. Join a Fisher organization or take a leadership role in which you are already a member.
  3. Make a great connection with a recruiter? Put that business card you received to use and send an email, write a letter, or make a phone call to follow up on your conversation. Remember to thank them for simply coming to the fair and speaking with you!
  4. Keep in touch with past professors, your boss from a past summer job or internship, and others that may be able to help you in the future as a reference on an application.
  5. Make sure your voicemail box on your cell phone is not full. The message should be quick, clear and professional. Hopefully you will get a call to come in for an interview!

#tbt Career Management Style: Let’s Get Personal (NOT).

Written by Undergraduate Consultant, Marlina Frederick

How to Find a Job

With recruitment season in full swing, our office is all business, all the time! In the midst of recruitment events, career fairs, and interviews we stumbled across this gem. How to Find a Job: A Plan that Works was published in 1950 and contains tips for job seekers. Believe it or not, some of the advice is still relevant! Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing some of our favorite throwbacks from this pamphlet and the do’s and don’t’s of the job search process. Enjoy!


How to Find a Job recommends that in a “blind” letter of application, candidates provide certain personal data: “your age, whether married or single, whether you have children, whether you are in good health.” These qualities were thought to provide perspective employers with an understanding of the candidate’s character. For example: married, family man = reliable, responsible. Today, it is illegal for employers to ask you about your marital status, family life, or health. Volunteering information that employers are legally not allowed to ask for may put the recruiter in an uncomfortable position. When in doubt, DON’T get personal!