#tbt The Waiting Game

Imagine the following situation: You apply for a position that you’re very excited about. You meet the qualifications and are really interested in the company. Over the next few days, you check your e-mail constantly. Every time you see a new e-mail alert, you think “this could be it!!” One week passes. Nothing. Two weeks pass. Nothing. You start to wonder, “Did I remember to press ‘submit’?” Three weeks pass. No response. It’s over, they’re not interested… right?

You might be wrong! How to Find a Job advises:

“The list of prospective employers you have prepared is a “live” list and it is certainly worth more than one follow-up. Do not consider that the prospect is “dead” just because you received no reply…”

It is appropriate, and recommended, to follow-up a few weeks after applying for a position. You can follow-up by calling or e-mailing the hiring manager or HR representative and requesting information about the status of your application. Make sure to introduce yourself and reference the position that you applied for and the date on which you submitted your application.

Companies that post positions on FisherConnect will often provide an application deadline, but companies that advertise elsewhere may not provide this information. In these cases, it can be very helpful to follow-up about 2 weeks after submitting your application. A word of caution: make sure to respect the employer’s timeline, if provided. For example, do not follow-up if the application deadline has not yet passed. Additionally, avoid repeated and frequent inquiries. You might need to move on to other prospects, but it never hurts to follow-up!

#tbt By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. –Benjamin Franklin

Written by Undergraduate Consultant, Marlina Frederick

Cliché, but true! Prior to an interview, it’s important that you prepare by conducting company research. How to Find a Job explains:

“It’s very natural for you to want to “drop everything and run,” getting there as fast as you can; but that’s the wrong thing to do. There’s work to be done before you make that call. First, if you haven’t found out facts you ought to know about the firm you hope to become associated with, do so before you call. Important facts are: (a) the business of the firm, (b) what goods they produce or sell, (c) the length of time they have been in business, (d) their financial rating, (e) the kind of job you are to apply for, (f) your qualifications for that job.”

If company research seems kind of overwhelming, remember that job seekers in the 50’s didn’t have the World Wide Web at their fingertips! Utilize the company’s website, online business journals, and company information databases like Hoover’s to help you learn about the company. For more information on how to conduct company research, check out our Company Research Guide. Happy researching!

#tbt Mirror, mirror, on the wall …

Some things haven’t changed since the 50’s. How to Find a Job reminds job seekers to check personal appearance before heading to an interview:

“Did you bathe? Is your hair neatly combed? Are you teeth brushed? Is your breath sweet? Are your fingernails clean? Are your shoes shined? Are your clothes neatly pressed? These may seem like rather personal questions, but you must remember that employers are—and have a right to be—extremely critical. If you are slovenly in appearance, they have good reason to believe that you will be slovenly in your work.”

Take a minute to check your appearance in the mirror (and maybe give yourself a quick pep-talk!) before heading off to an interview. Good luck!