10 Tips and 10 Days until the Career Fair!

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015 11:30 am to 4:30 pm

  1. Double Check! Pull your suit out and check to make sure it’s in great shape. Did you just buy a new suit? Please, please, please remove the threaded “X’s” from your suit jacket or skirt in the back and cut open the pockets on pants or a jacket if they are sewn shut. Check out this YouTube link before you ruin your new suit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeHlSbJ2b04
  2. Do bring positive energy! Don’t act tired or like you don’t want to be there. You may have just raced over from your very boring two hour lecture and it’s extremely hot outside, but don’t let that show.
  3. When you talk about your work experiences, describe your accomplishments rather than your duties.
  4. REMEMBER NAMES! Nothing is worse than going in for an NDI (Next Day Interview, for those who don’t work in the best office ever…cough cough… Office of Career Management…cough cough), being asked whom you met with yesterday, and having absolutely no clue except that you think he was wearing a red tie. Pay attention to their name tag, ask for a business card, use their name while you are talking, and jot it down in your padfolio once you leave their table.
  5. Always ask for a business card at the end of your conversation, the best way to contact them, or what the next step would be. I have an app called “SamCard” which is a business card reader. I just take a quick picture of the card and it automatically uploads their information to your phone’s address book.
  6. Don’t interrupt a conversation. If an employer sees that you have no problem being rude to a fellow Buckeye, they definitely don’t want you being rude in their office.
  7. Don’t spend time with companies if you have no interest in working there. Yes, their free pens look super temping, but it’s not worth your time when someone else may be impressing the company you’ve always wanted to work for while you hunt down the place with the cool magnets.
  8. Don’t be intimidated; THEY aren’t going to walk up to the nervous looking students an awkward distance away from the table and introduce themselves, that’s YOUR job (they already have one)!
  9. Don’t use a loose fish grip as a handshake. Nothing says I have no idea what I’m doing like a terrible handshake. Make sure to practice before hand if you’re worried about this part. Also, make sure to make great eye contact. Walk up with confidence and make a killer first impression!
  10. GET EXCITED! Follow @FisherCareerMgt for last minute information about the fair!

15 Tips because it’s 15 Days Until the Career Fair

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair

Wednesday, September 9th 2015 11:30 am to 4:30 pm

  1. Check your email! I hope you ordered a Fisher name tag from https://fisher.osu.edu/store/item.php?item_id=78, keep checking your email to see when you can pick them up in the Office of Career Management located in 150 Gerlach Hall.
  2. Attend an Internship and Job Fair prep workshop! Keep a look out for them on your OSU email account.
  3. Research, research, research… Approaching a table saying, “Hmmm what does this company do?” is probably not a great way to start off a conversation. Knowing the company shows you have initiative, are prepared and well organized.
  4. While doing your research make sure to set goals first. Write a list of personal and professional goals you wish to achieve and see how each company’s available positions and culture would fit with what you want to accomplish.
  5. Get your “1 minute commercial” ready for every employer. It’s a summary of your resume, the answer to the typical “Tell me about yourself” question and is an easy way to get any conversation going.
  6. Ask open ended questions about the company that aren’t simple “Do you have positions for accounting students” or the like just shows that you didn’t care enough to simply visit their website.
  7. Don’t be that kid standing in the middle of a very crowded aisle looking at his phone researching the company for the very first time. Study the information before the fair so you are confident when approaching an employer. Be ready with a few questions to demonstrate your knowledge and interest in the company.
  8. Make the Office of Career Management your new best friend. Schedule a QUIC interview now so that you are QUIC certified before the Career Fair.
  9. Check out what else the Office of Career Management can help you with like resume critiquing and meetings with career consultants. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZnu_RSbWw0#t=73
  10. Don’t have time to visit our office? Then look at this website to see cover letters, resumes, thank you letters and other written guides to effective and professional correspondence. http://fisher.osu.edu/offices/career-management/student-resources/undergraduate/job-search-handouts/
  11. Get connected. Update your LinkedIn for (hopefully) lots of employers to see. Remember your LinkedIn page doesn’t have to match your typical 1 page resume. Don’t be afraid to list more details than you normally would on a paper resume.
  12. Log onto FisherConnect and submit your most recent resume before September 9th!
  13. Download the OSU Career Fair+ app to research companies that will be attending the event!
  14. Don’t forget the little things! If you can’t iron your suit or you show up with wet hair it looks like you don’t have time for yourself, yet alone the company. Over 2,000 students will be showing up to this career fair, these companies have a lot to choose from- don’t make wrinkled ties or a short skirt keep you from getting an interview. And remember SMILE!
  15. Did you know that companies registered and PAID for this career fair back in June? It’s a free opportunity for Fisher students and companies know that it’s an amazing place to recruit. Be confident and take pride that you are a Buckeye!

Life Moves Pretty Fast

One of my all-time favorite movies is Ferris Bueller’s Big Day Off. My favorite line is “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” Even though it is only a movie quote, it is very true to me. It is so easy to get caught up in needing to do this or that. I can’t tell you how many times I get wrapped up in tasks, projects, or trying to be my best that I lose sight of the bigger picture.

Upon first arriving at work this morning, I got an email about completing my 2015 Self Evaluation Performance Review. Then it dawned on me; half of my internship was up. Just like that. Life was moving fast and I need to act fast before I miss it! So I figured while I take time reflecting on myself for my review, I would share my perspective with you.

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Key’s Mascot

 

In hindsight, I have learned more than I ever thought I would in the past 4 weeks. Whether it was learning how to evaluate risks or test controls in order to ensure that data and code cannot be manipulated to produce misrepresentative financial information. Through this learning I have been able to test multiple applications to contribute to the greater Information Technology General Control Team (ITGC) within the Risk Review Group(RRG).

On the other hand, I have explored other areas of interest. While digging a little deeper into risks and controls, I was able to see how code and programming can be used to leverage data in order to verify records from the lines of business. I have previously used Tableau, but it was interesting to see what products like IBM’s Cognos and SAS can offer the internal audit department of a bank.

Throughout my internship, Key has posed many unique opportunities. Meeting Beth Mooney, the CEO of KeyCorp, put the cherry on top. Beth has been an inspiration to me ever since I started getting to know Key. Not only is she a female CEO, she is also the most powerful woman in banking.( http://www.americanbanker.com/women-in-banking/gallery/the-25-most-powerful-women-in-banking-2014-1070053-1.html) When was the last time you met the most powerful anything? Being able to spontaneously run into Beth at a celebratory Key event was truly humbling. I feel so lucky that she spent a few moments connecting with me and a few other interns from RRG. I’m inspired to say the least.

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Beth Mooney (KeyCorp CEO)

 

Opinions expressed are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of KeyBank

25 Short, Sweet Tips for Success as a Summer Intern

by Sarah Steenrod

While it seems like just yesterday (okay, so more like 13 years ago) I was an intern at Neiman Marcus in Las Vegas, the lessons I learned and experiences I had a during that pivotal time in my college and professional career are crystal clear. Here are some tips that will help make your internship a success:

  1. Set goals. Having personal and professional goals can help you make the most of your summer, stay on track, and know if you have achieved what you set out to do.
  2. Ask questions. An internship is a learning process and you may need to seek clarification along the way.
  3. Participate in all intern and company activities that you are invited to. It’s a great way to meet fellow interns and people at the company who are investing their time in your experience.
  4. Share your ideas. People want to know what you think, so speak up!
  5. If you finish your work, ask for more. By taking initiative, you may end up with an awesome project or learning experience.
  6. Pack your lunch. You’ll save money and calories. It’s absolutely fine to join your colleagues and treat yourself to lunch every once in a while, but you will thank yourself at the end of the summer if you don’t blow your paychecks on takeout sushi.
  7. Dress for the job you want, not the one you have. Always be sure to follow the dress code. Make sure your clothes are clean, neat, and pressed
  8. Get a good night’s rest. If you’re used to going to bed at 2 a.m., the sound of the alarm at 6 a.m. is going to be a rude awakening (literally and figuratively). No one at your workplace will care if you’re tired, so don’t look or act tired.
  9. Consider your internship a three-month interview. This is your opportunity to make the most of each day with the potential of getting a job offer at the end.
  10. Ask people if you can be of help to them. You might think you don’t have a lot to offer, but perhaps one of your colleagues has a child that is considering your university and would love to hear your perspective.
  11. Explore the city…and the food. If you’re in Cleveland, don’t miss the West Side Market and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. St. Louis is famous for fried ravioli. In Houston, be sure to try the BBQ.
  12. Exercise. Take a brisk walk, ride a bike, run, do yoga! Do whatever you like, just get moving!
  13. Drink water. That’s what the water coolers are for! Eight 8-ounce glasses day is what’s recommended, but if that sounds like a lot, just start with a couple glasses a day. It also helps to get a water bottle that you really like.
  14. If you make a mistake, acknowledge it, find a way to fix it, and move on. Don’t make excuses.
  15. Connect with alumni from your school. Use your university’s alumni club. Tap into the LinkedIn Find Alumni tool.
  16. Check in regularly with your parents, family members, and friends and let them know how your internship is going….they will appreciate it.
  17. Say please. It’s amazing how many people will be willing to help you if you ask nicely.
  18. Follow all computer rules and lock your computer when you step away from your desk. Also, if your company has a social media policy, refrain from posting on Facebook during work hours.
  19. Ask for feedback. Some supervisors will be good at giving you positive and constructive feedback, while others may be less forthcoming. If they know it’s important to you, they may be more likely to give it.
  20. Avoid office gossip. If someone talks about others to you, they are probably talking about you to others.
  21. Pay attention to your experiences, reflect on them, and jot down a few notes. Your worst on-the-job experience may someday be your best interview story. The trick is remembering all the details.
  22. Wear sunscreen. Seriously
  23. Be present and enjoy the experience!
  24. Keep in touch. Don’t wait until you need something to e-mail your former supervisor. Send an e-mail every once in a while to check in and let them know how you’re doing.
  25. Thank people and let them know how they impacted your life and career. A handwritten note is a very nice touch.

Sarah Steenrod is Director of Undergraduate Career Consultation and Programs in the Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

How to Make the Most of Your Summer Internship

By Kaitlin Bressler, Undergraduate Career Consultant

With summer right around the corner, there is no better time than the present to determine how you will make the most of the journey you are about to embark on. Here are some tips to help you be most successful before, during, and after your internship.

Preparing for your Summer Internship:

Set Personal Goals

Before your summer internship, write a list of goals you hope to achieve over the summer. These goals can be work related, such as completing a certain type of project, or these could even be some personal goals you’ve set for yourself. For example, getting out of your comfort zone, or simply meeting new people and creating new relationships this summer. It’s a good idea to document these goals so that you can go back at the end of your internship and do some self-reflecting and hopefully realize that you’ve grown a lot throughout the course of your internship experience.

Seek out Alumni

It is always a good idea to reach out to alumni at your organization, or even just in your city so you have someone you can look to as a resource. Before you begin your internship, set up an initial coffee or lunch meeting. Have a list of good conversation starters prepared for when you meet up, such as “How did you originally find your position?” or “What do you enjoy the most about working at _____?” This person will likely be a great resource or mentor for you, especially if you are moving to a new city for your internship.

Dress Successfully

Make sure you know the office dress code expectations for the summer. If dress is business professional, you will want to make sure you’re prepared with the appropriate attire before the summer internship starts. Companies have different dress policies, so it’s a good idea to reach out to your HR representative to make sure you’re aware of the company dress policies before you start the internship.

Things to Consider During your Internship:

First Impressions/Confidence

It’s always important to maintain a good first impression. Make sure to be on time, and always be prompt to meetings, even if everyone else is not. During your internship it is important to remember that you are being observed under a magnifying glass, so try to minimize errors, but realize it is always ok to ask for help or clarification on projects. Try to find opportunities to contribute your ideas in group meetings, and find a way to be indispensable.

Track your Internship Projects

It is a good idea to keep track of all the projects you work on this summer. Good documentation of these assignments will help you in the future to remember what exactly you worked on (which will come in handy during future resume writing or interviewing).

Solicit Feedback

Make sure you have frequent check-in meetings with your internship supervisor and seek out feedback on your goals and achievements. Knowing your progress will help you be a more successful professional in the long run.

Handling Social Situations

Build the right kind of reputation by maintaining a high level of professionalism throughout the summer internship. Make an effort to get to know many people at your internship location this summer, and try to be friendly and open when communicating with colleagues or peers.

Stay in Touch with Internship Contacts

Staying in touch with contacts is extremely valuable. You never know when you will need a good recommendation, or need to consult someone about a new project you are working on. Because past colleagues can be great resources or references, it is good to maintain relationships so you can reach out to them if you’re ever in need.