Don’t forget to take that Buckeye Pride into your interview…

Last week, the Fisher Futures class was given the opportunity to listen to Jeff Rice, the executive director of the Office of Career Management. While there were many “pearls of wisdom” in his talk, the single most important piece of advice he gave us was to remain confident in the job search and to take pride in ourselves as Buckeyes. As we prepare for our futures and begin to journey toward internships, interviews, and other challenges, it is very important to keep in mind Jeff’s message of confidence building. Often times, we will be competing with students from other schools who misguidedly believe they have the upper hand in competing with us and we need to keep Jeff’s thoughts in mind and maintain our internal self-confidence regarding the quality of our school and Fisher College of Business.

Fisher is a premier business school, recognized by Businessweek as the 34th and 12th best public business school for undergraduate and graduate studies, respectively. Beyond that, Businessweek states we are the 9th best worldwide for the executive MBA. Our business school produces CEOs of companies and leaders around the globe. These statistics and confidence builders are so important to remember as we go forth. Jeff was very astute in telling the Fisher Futures class that, as Buckeyes, we must be proud and understand there is no geographical constraint to our job search and the opportunities are infinite.

Katherine Stith – Fisher Futures Program

Fisher Spring Internship & Job Fair 2015 – Everything You Need to Know!

2015 Fisher Spring Internship and Job Fair
February 3, 2015
2pm – 6PM
The Ohio Union Archie Griffin Ballrooms
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR THIS YEAR’S FAIR:
  • There is NO admission fee for students
  • Get the OSU Career Fair mobile app to access the Company Major Charts and the Fisher Spring Job and Internship Fair Map now! Booklets with company information will NOT be printed
  • Bring your BuckID, as you will need to swipe to get in
  • $1 per item coat check –  located on first floor across from Station 88

Spring Internship & Job Fair Company Hiring NeedsGet the app!  Download the OSU Career Fair+ mobile app to research companies attending the event along with the majors and job types employers are recruiting.

Log on to FisherConnect to view attending companies and submit your resume before the event. There is no preregistration required; students will register as they arrive at the fair.

Internship & Job Fair Prep Workshops

Wednesday, January 28  12:30-1:30pm  Schoenbaum 315

Thursday, January 29  1:00-2:00pm  Schoenbaum 209

Friday, January 30  2:30-3:30pm Schoenbaum 209

2015 Leadership Summit

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Want to stand out for job opportunities? The 2015 Leadership Summit is an annual, all-day experience that seeks to bring together aspiring student leaders from across Ohio State’s campus. This event will allow you the opportunity to uncover your leadership strengths and network.  The itinerary includes a VP of UPS opening speaker, break-out development sessions held by industry professionals and dinner with company recruiters.

The 2015 Leadership Summit will be held at the Ohio Union on January 31st from 1-7 PM.

Deadline to register is December 15th.

Find out more information and register online http://www.osuleadershipsummit.com/student-registration.html!

The Art of Politely Declining a Job Offer

by Sarah Steenrod, Director of Undergraduate Career Consultation & Programs

You’ve finally accepted a job offer – CONGRATULATIONS! It’s time to celebrate!

BUT…before you do so…Hold up!…Wait a minute!

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Take some time to reach out to any employers you have received offers from or if you are choosing to remove yourself from a company’s candidate pool. It’s better to do this sooner rather than later, as it could help another candidate have an opportunity you are no longer interested in.

You might be saying to yourself, this all sounds good, but what is the best way to go about doing so? We thought you might ask, so we went ahead and pulled together some tips:

Pick up the phone. It is likely that a recruiter has gone out of their way to provide you with information and answer any questions you have had throughout the recruiting process. Show them the same respect and personalized approach by reaching out to have a conversation.

Be very appreciative. Declining an offer can be very intimidating to job seekers. Before cutting to the chase, it always helps to lead in to the conversation by showing your appreciation of their time and interest in you.

Avoid the one liner. Whether in an email or over the phone, nothing feels more like a “slap in the face” to a recruiter than when a student sends them a one line message declining the offer.

Be transparent. It can be very helpful for a recruiter to know why you decided to go with another company or opportunity. Students can either feel free to provide some information about their decision making process and why they chose the company they did or be prepared for questions about their decision. Recruiters often have to report back to their team when offers are declined and it can be helpful to have some context. Some factors may be out of their control, such as a geographic or industry preference, but other factors could be within their control, such as offering housing or relocation assistance.

Keep in touch. A company you decline today might be your target five years from now. It’s always good to keep in touch with people you met during the process. Chances are if they liked you well enough to want to hire you, they will have an interest in keeping in touch as professional colleagues.

Remember – It’s a Small World. Recruiters often change companies and they rarely forget when they’ve been burned. They’re human, right? You should be in good shape if you do the right thing, tell the truth, and always say thank you! Not only are you representing yourself, you are representing the Fisher College of Business and The Ohio State University. Feel free to reach out to the Office of Career Management and schedule an appointment if you would like to discuss anything more specific to your situation 292-6024.

Again, congratulations on accepting an employment offer!

 

 

Reneging on job offers (Don’t do it)

Reneging on job offers is often a touchy subject—but nevertheless it’s a topic that business students are often confused about. What does reneging even mean?

Renege (definition): To go back on a promise, undertaking or contract

Synonyms: default on, fail to honor, go back on, break, back out of, withdraw from, retreat from, etc.

Sounds pretty serious, right? It is. As a Fisher business student, you will be developing a lot of relationships with peers, faculty, staff, and employer representatives. Along the way you will start to develop your “personal brand”—the unique set of characteristics that distinguish you from other job seekers. One of the characteristics of successful business people is having integrity. Loyalty, reliability, and honesty are all hallmarks of some of the most successful leaders in the world. If you want to start you career off on the right foot by gaining the respect of employers, reneging on a job offer is a situation you do not want to find yourself in.

It is very important that as you begin your internship or full-time job search, you manage your offers professionally. A verbal or written acceptance of an offer of employment is considered a commitment. It is never permissible to accept a job offer (either verbal or written) and later decline. This can get you into serious trouble! Not only will you lose the respect of the company, but you are harming your reputation (personal brand) as a job candidate.

The best way to prevent the possibility of having to renege on an offer is to always openly communicate with employers about your current job search. If you receive a job offer, but you are still waiting to hear back from other companies, it is almost always appropriate to ask for a deadline extension. Most companies are aware that you are probably looking at other employment opportunities, so they will not be surprised if you ask for more time to decide. If the company truly wants you to work there, they will accommodate your request.

Here is an example situation: Let’s say that you interviewed with Company A on October 12th and Company B on October 15th. Company A is your top choice, and Company B is your second choice. Company B really liked you, and they promptly made you an offer on October 16th and asked for a decision by October 23rd. You still have not heard back from Company A, your first choice, although they told you that you would know by October 27th.  The most appropriate way to handle this situation is to tell Company B about your status. You could say,

“Thank you so much for the offer. I am definitely considering your offer; however, I am currently in the process of interviewing with another company and would like to follow through with their process. I should hear back from them by October 27th. It would really help me to make the best decision if I could have an extension on accepting your offer. Could I have until November 1st to give you my decision?”

Asking for an extension this way accomplishes 2 things:

1) You are being honest and open with the company about your situation, thereby promoting integrity in your relationship with the company

2) If the company agrees to your new deadline, you have given yourself the opportunity to evaluate both job offers, if you receive an offer from Company A

In most cases, the company will agree to your terms. During fall recruiting season, the Office of Career Management encourages all companies to give students an acceptance deadline of November 1st, or four weeks from the time of the offer (whichever date comes later). In the spring, we recommend 2 weeks in order to give students adequate time to truly consider the offer.

Not only does reneging hurt your reputation, but it also can come with some pretty serious consequences! If it is determined that you have reneged on either an internship or career position offer, you will be asked to meet with one of our full-time staff members in Career Management to discuss your situation. Depending on your situation, consequences could include: your writing of a letter of apology, your access to FisherConnect being discontinued, and/or your access to services as an alum being denied.

If you find yourself in a situation with multiple job offers, it would be very helpful to you to meet with a Career Consultant in our office to discuss the offers and how to manage deadlines, so that you can make good decisions and not violate any policies. Simply call our office at 614-292-6024 to schedule an appointment. We are here to help you in any way we can!

For more info, check out this blog about an employer’s perspective when students renege on an offer: http://blog.naceweb.org/2014/08/19/when-a-student-reneges-on-a-job-offer-an-employers-perspective/