10 Tips and 10 Days until the Career Fair!

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015 11:30 am to 4:30 pm

  1. Double Check! Pull your suit out and check to make sure it’s in great shape. Did you just buy a new suit? Please, please, please remove the threaded “X’s” from your suit jacket or skirt in the back and cut open the pockets on pants or a jacket if they are sewn shut. Check out this YouTube link before you ruin your new suit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeHlSbJ2b04
  2. Do bring positive energy! Don’t act tired or like you don’t want to be there. You may have just raced over from your very boring two hour lecture and it’s extremely hot outside, but don’t let that show.
  3. When you talk about your work experiences, describe your accomplishments rather than your duties.
  4. REMEMBER NAMES! Nothing is worse than going in for an NDI (Next Day Interview, for those who don’t work in the best office ever…cough cough… Office of Career Management…cough cough), being asked whom you met with yesterday, and having absolutely no clue except that you think he was wearing a red tie. Pay attention to their name tag, ask for a business card, use their name while you are talking, and jot it down in your padfolio once you leave their table.
  5. Always ask for a business card at the end of your conversation, the best way to contact them, or what the next step would be. I have an app called “SamCard” which is a business card reader. I just take a quick picture of the card and it automatically uploads their information to your phone’s address book.
  6. Don’t interrupt a conversation. If an employer sees that you have no problem being rude to a fellow Buckeye, they definitely don’t want you being rude in their office.
  7. Don’t spend time with companies if you have no interest in working there. Yes, their free pens look super temping, but it’s not worth your time when someone else may be impressing the company you’ve always wanted to work for while you hunt down the place with the cool magnets.
  8. Don’t be intimidated; THEY aren’t going to walk up to the nervous looking students an awkward distance away from the table and introduce themselves, that’s YOUR job (they already have one)!
  9. Don’t use a loose fish grip as a handshake. Nothing says I have no idea what I’m doing like a terrible handshake. Make sure to practice before hand if you’re worried about this part. Also, make sure to make great eye contact. Walk up with confidence and make a killer first impression!
  10. GET EXCITED! Follow @FisherCareerMgt for last minute information about the fair!

15 Tips because it’s 15 Days Until the Career Fair

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair

Wednesday, September 9th 2015 11:30 am to 4:30 pm

  1. Check your email! I hope you ordered a Fisher name tag from https://fisher.osu.edu/store/item.php?item_id=78, keep checking your email to see when you can pick them up in the Office of Career Management located in 150 Gerlach Hall.
  2. Attend an Internship and Job Fair prep workshop! Keep a look out for them on your OSU email account.
  3. Research, research, research… Approaching a table saying, “Hmmm what does this company do?” is probably not a great way to start off a conversation. Knowing the company shows you have initiative, are prepared and well organized.
  4. While doing your research make sure to set goals first. Write a list of personal and professional goals you wish to achieve and see how each company’s available positions and culture would fit with what you want to accomplish.
  5. Get your “1 minute commercial” ready for every employer. It’s a summary of your resume, the answer to the typical “Tell me about yourself” question and is an easy way to get any conversation going.
  6. Ask open ended questions about the company that aren’t simple “Do you have positions for accounting students” or the like just shows that you didn’t care enough to simply visit their website.
  7. Don’t be that kid standing in the middle of a very crowded aisle looking at his phone researching the company for the very first time. Study the information before the fair so you are confident when approaching an employer. Be ready with a few questions to demonstrate your knowledge and interest in the company.
  8. Make the Office of Career Management your new best friend. Schedule a QUIC interview now so that you are QUIC certified before the Career Fair.
  9. Check out what else the Office of Career Management can help you with like resume critiquing and meetings with career consultants. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZnu_RSbWw0#t=73
  10. Don’t have time to visit our office? Then look at this website to see cover letters, resumes, thank you letters and other written guides to effective and professional correspondence. http://fisher.osu.edu/offices/career-management/student-resources/undergraduate/job-search-handouts/
  11. Get connected. Update your LinkedIn for (hopefully) lots of employers to see. Remember your LinkedIn page doesn’t have to match your typical 1 page resume. Don’t be afraid to list more details than you normally would on a paper resume.
  12. Log onto FisherConnect and submit your most recent resume before September 9th!
  13. Download the OSU Career Fair+ app to research companies that will be attending the event!
  14. Don’t forget the little things! If you can’t iron your suit or you show up with wet hair it looks like you don’t have time for yourself, yet alone the company. Over 2,000 students will be showing up to this career fair, these companies have a lot to choose from- don’t make wrinkled ties or a short skirt keep you from getting an interview. And remember SMILE!
  15. Did you know that companies registered and PAID for this career fair back in June? It’s a free opportunity for Fisher students and companies know that it’s an amazing place to recruit. Be confident and take pride that you are a Buckeye!

What I Have Learned from 10 Weeks in the Real World

My summer as a Merchandise Analyst Intern at Kohl’s has been nothing short of an all around incredible experience. Over the past ten weeks, I have learned more than I ever thought possible, and have experienced my first taste of what a career in the retail world actually looks like. Reflecting on my internship search and my experiences this summer, here are a few of my major takeaways:

1. Just because you don’t get one internship does not mean you won’t get any internship.

This is such an easy thing to tell yourself…after you finally get an internship. One of the most frustrating times during my junior year was from December to March, during which I was on a quest to find the “perfect” internship. I probably applied to about 30 internships, and heard back from maybe five. This is not because I was unqualified (although, that is what I started to convince myself of), but it is easy to forget that thousands of other college juniors are probably doing the same thing you are. Not receiving or hearing back from your “dream internship” can be a punch in the gut, but then again, what really is a “dream internship” anyway? In college, you have never really been in the working world yet, so keeping your options open to all of the possibilities when in your search can open your eyes to interests you may not know you have, or companies you never considered.

2. First impressions are something, but not everything.

Everyone will tell you that on your first day, you need to be on your “A-game” and that you should be dressed to the nines, but in reality, this should be something you are thinking of everyday of your internship. Your first day is very important, don’t get me wrong, but when I think about what I have done this summer or the impression I gave, I don’t think that what I was wearing or how firm my handshake was is in the forefront of my manager’s mind. These are important qualities, but it’s almost a given that each college student should possess these skills. What you do in the weeks following that initial meeting are what people remember you by, and whether or not you are able to back up a great first impression is what really counts.

3. Don’t let one small thing keep you from opening your mind to new experiences. 

Candidly, I was very hesitant to move to Milwaukee this summer for my internship with Kohl’s. I knew it was a great company and that it was awesome opportunity to have earned, but I was hesitant to leave behind my friends who would now be eight hours away in Columbus. I am more than thankful that my parents encouraged me to take a risk and move here for the summer, because it has completely paid off, and then some. One thing my mom always says to me is, “Don’t wait around and make your decisions based on what everyone else is doing, because they aren’t waiting around for you, and then you’re going to be the one left behind.” I was so worried that I would be missing out on fun summer happenings in Ohio, but passing up an amazing opportunity like this because of that would have been one of the biggest mistakes I could have made.

4. Sometimes what you are looking for comes when you are not looking at all. 

That may sound cheesy, but by the end of my internship search, I felt very defeated. I had spent more time looking for a job than I did on anything else during those three months, but was having no luck in finding something that really fit all that I was looking for. I met a Kohl’s recruiter at the spring internship fair, and interviewed on a whim. During the interview process, it became very clear to me that this company invested a great deal of effort and time into their internship program, and this was very exciting to me. I had never considered Kohl’s as an option before, mostly due to the location. However, just when I was ready to give up, what I would soon find to be an amazing opportunity showed up, and I couldn’t be more thankful that it did! I can’t stress enough what keeping an open mind can do for you, I just wish I had realized it sooner!

During my last few days at Kohl’s I am trying to soak in anything and everything I can! It has been an incredible summer, and I feel so lucky to have had the opportunity to play a small part in such a big operation!

The power of being fearless- Cold Emails

The purpose of this post is to show you how to get anyone in your company to respond to your email. I have had success using the techniques below while interning at PepsiCo.

Disclaimer: The techniques mentioned in this blog post were derived from The Competitive Edge podcast Episode 30.

Before the Email

It is possible to reach ANYONE in your company by phone for a short conversation. If you are not afraid of rejection, you can get in touch with anyone through cold emailing.

How to Find an Email

If your company uses Microsoft Office, you have access to all employees’ email in your company. Steps to get an email are shown in the pictures below

blog

Articulating the Email

Below is an email I sent to a Senior Vice President at PepsiCo (the equivalent of the CFO for supply chain) asking for career advice.

blog 1

The Breakdown

Subject Line

Grab their attention. Make a subject line that will draw attention and sum up why you are emailing them.

My example: Following in Your Footsteps

Introduction

Cut straight to the point; do not waste words on meaningless background facts (hometown, school major, interests etc.). The short introduction is vital; you will capture the person’s attention in the first sentence. Throw something in at the end of the sentence that will make them want to read more.

My Example: I aspire to be as impactful as you have been in PepsiCo and the world.

Gaging interest

The second sentence is the most important part of the email. You must connect on an emotional level here. In my email, I brought up an achievement of his which he is extremely proud of while relating it to myself. Referencing something specific shows you have researched the person and are serious about getting time on his/her calendar. When bringing up a topic that connects you and your targeted executive, keep in mind it can be anything that you relate to. Some examples are an article the person wrote, an interview that he/she gave, a position they held, specific accomplishments or even a personal hobby you both share.

My example: Your influence on Gatorade, my favorite drink, to move it to a Kosher beverage is truly amazing especially because half my family keeps Kosher.

Specific Time – 10,3

Put time on their calendar and be specific. It’s harder for someone to say no if you found an open timeslot on their calendar, exemplify that you have a plan and are not going to waste a second with them. A personal rule of mine is to request ten minutes of their time to ask three questions. Ten minutes is short enough where they can be willing to speak to you but long enough where you can get some good information.

My example: I have put time on your calendar to speak with you on Thursday at 10:00 but will only need ten minutes of your time to ask you three questions.

blog2

Throwing in a blog2 towards the end of your email lightens up the subject matter. Do not use this for every person you email though. You must understand what industry this person is in and if it will be taken in a positive or negative way. If you can find out that the person is easy going definitely throw it in there.

My example: I’m looking forward to your response blog2

Proofread!

Notice how I had a grammar error because I did not proofread. Always double check your work to avoid a costly mistake.

Persistence

Anticipate that the executive will initially deny your request to have a phone call. BE PERSISTENT. I sent my email request three days in a row until the executive accepted my meeting with him.

 

Best of luck and happy interning!

 

A Day in the Life of a Technological Auditor

As I promised in my first blog post, “Gearing up for my Summer Internship at Key Bank”, I will go into more detail about what being an IT General Controls Sox Audit team member looks like on a day to day basis. Before I get into anything too serious, I need to start with the basics. Some of the most important things that I have learned this summer about being a technological auditor are from my marvelous manager, Brian Drotleff. Ironically, most of those things are witty one-liners. Some of my most coveted one-liners are:

  • Be comfortable being uncomfortable
  • Be curious
  • Trust, but verify
  • If it’s not documented, it didn’t happen

With these handy dandy proverbs in your pocket there is nothing you can’t achieve in the working world.

The first saying is by far my favorite. I think being comfortable being uncomfortable is applicable to all parts of life. If you can be comfortable not understanding or knowing everything, but make inquisitive, intelligent steps towards your task, then you will be worlds better off. Throughout my internship I have learned to be comfortable being uncomfortable really quick. From day one I was staffed onto a project looking into access provisioning. I am by no means a subject matter expert on access provisioning, but by accepting what I do know I am able to then build steps to fill the gaps of what I do not know therefore completing my testing. The more comfortable I get with being uncomfortable the better I fair with each set of new testing!

The second maxim once again applies to almost everything in life and ties in very closely with the first. If I had a nickel for every time I was encouraged to be curious, I would probably already be retired. All jokes aside, being curious is really important to being a technological auditor. If I get an email back from app support and I do not really understand what they mean, it’s imperative to take it a step further to make sure my understanding aligns with the deciphered technological lingo and abbreviations (there are abbreviations for everything – including abbreviations for abbreviations).

The third axiom plays off the second. It is paramount for all Risk Review, or the third line of defense, to ensure that what is being reported is accurate. There is no way to ensure the information sourced from applications and systems, if the application and system can’t be ensured to be working efficiently and accurately. For example, if an individual tells you a password is securely stored – that’s great. You can trust them, but you better verify.

The final one-liner is probably the most important. I can be as comfortable being uncomfortable, as curious, or as verified as I want, but none of it happened unless I document it. Throughout my internship the screen shot has become my best friend. I am constantly logging different conversations and pulled reports as form of documentation. As tedious as it may seem, documenting is very valuable. When coming across a speed bump in testing, it is very nice to be able to look back at all the documented details from last year to give clues to the next steps.

The most challenging part about being a technological auditor is walking the line between being a member of the KeyBank team and being an independent body to the lines of business. Many lines of business don’t reply or comply in a timely fashion because we are seen as the folks that show up once a year and point out all of the mistakes similarly to regulators and external auditors. I spend a measurable time at work trying to track down emails and get answers. At the end of the day, we all play for the same team. Whether the lines of business acknowledge it or not, it is much better off for Risk Review to find something rather than the regulators or the external auditors.

Opinions expressed are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of KeyBank

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 5.24.34 PM

Brian Drotleff – SOX IT Audit Extraordinaire