What Happens After the Fisher Fall Career Fair?

Congratulations on conquering the Career Fair! You have tackled the big day, but your road to finding a summer internship isn’t quite over yet.  Career Fair Pro, Jacqueline, provides advice on the next steps you should take following the Career Fair.

So the career fair is over and you’ve conquered the big day – what now?

Don’t forget to actually apply for different internships of companies you visited! Many companies will have given you handouts with the link to apply, or portals to apply can easily be found online or on the company website.

If you collected business cards or names of recruiters that you talked to at the career fair, be sure to send them individual, personalized emails – thanking them for their time, reflecting back to something you talked about, and reiterating your interests in the company. If you genuinely connected with a recruiter from a company you are interested in, ask if you can schedule some time on their calendar for a phone call to talk more about your interests in the company.

Prepare for interviews that might come your way! Glassdoor is a fantastic resource to read about others’ experience in interviewing with the same company. Valuable information can also be found on the company website, as they often map out what the recruiting process looks like as well as timelines in case you forgot to ask the recruiters at the career fair.

Start a spreadsheet to document your communication and applications with companies! Make note of the names of the people you spoke to at each company and throughout the recruiting process if you progress further. Keep note of your account and user names used for applications with each company.

Attend any follow-up events that you can! Companies will often collect your contact information when you speak with them at the career fair and host different recruiting or networking workshops, dinners, and other sorts of events on campus after the career fair for students interested in the company. Sometimes invitations or notifications of these emails go to spam or clutter, so be sure to check all email folders in the weeks following the career fair, and capitalize on any opportunity to network with companies that you are interested in!

But what if nothing comes of this career fair?

Don’t be discouraged if you don’t get an internship directly out of the career fair! Every career fair can be used as a stepping stone, and there are countless ways to find internships that aren’t directly through the career fair.

Apply to companies that don’t recruit from Ohio State or post to Fisher Connect that you might be interested in! An incredible amount of companies recruit from Ohio State, but there are countless others that don’t come to the career fair! You can browse different companies’ websites to find information about how to apply for their internships.

Companies host events throughout the year that serve as ways for you to learn more about their company as well as opportunities for them to observe the way you work. Be sure to check Fisher Connect for such opportunities, as well as postings throughout Fisher, and emails from any Fisher-related organization.

Remember – there is always the spring career fair! Internships can be found at both the fall and the spring career fairs.

Best of luck!

The Career Fair has Finally Arrived!

The day is finally here, The Fisher Fall Career Fair!  As you get ready today, keep this advice from Career Fair Pro, Hannah, in mind!

After all the research and preparation, we are finally ready to embark on the glorious endeavor of employment. With that said, there are five things that you should prepare for and expect while at the Career Fair.

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  1. Professional Dress: Before you get to the career fair, ensure you’re wearing business professional from head to toe. For men, this includes dress shoes and socks as well as well-groomed hair and facial hair. For women, this includes comfortable closed toed professional shoes as well as groomed hair and nails. Be sure to invest in a black padfolio folder to carry your resumes and notebook for note taking. During my first career fair, I brought my resumes in a purple folder. Needless to say, I received many funny and discouraging looks.Blog Picture 2Blog Picture 3Blog Picture 4
  2. The Long Trek from Fisher to the Union: Before you can even approach a company booth, you need to make sure you are reflecting the best version of yourself. During the mile long trek from Fisher to the Union, there is plenty of time for your hair to fall out of place, your black suit to attract pollen, and for dreaded Buckeye back-sweat to appear. This year at the career fair, there will be a booth of “Career Fair Pros” on the Second Floor outside of the Ballroom. They are seniors who have been there and done that. They will be fully stocked with elevator pitch expertise, a mirror, lint rollers, and even breath mints. Make sure to swing by before you go to meet your destiny.
  3. People Everywhere: Nearly 2,000+ Buckeyes attend this Career Fair. This means that a lot is going on, as well as a lot of competition. Remember to use the OSU Career Fair Plus app to not get lost in the crowd. Even though many of your friends may also be there, make sure you aren’t approaching a booth in a group. It can be very overwhelming for a recruiter. Besides, the company is looking to hire you, not you and all of your friends. Lastly, the best way to stand out in a crowd is to wear your best smile!Blog Picture 5
  4. Waiting in Long Lines: Waiting in line is the best time to collect your bearings. Lines can last anywhere from 5 minutes to over a half an hour. While waiting in line, I recommend going over your elevator speech in your head to target it more to the company you are in line for. In addition, feel free to spark up conversation with people around you. As much as the line is a process to get to recruiters, it is also a social test to see how well you get along with others. Finally, be sure to listen into other student’s conversations with recruiters as you approach the end of the line. You may be able to catch some juicy insight that might better help your conversation.
  5. Introducing Yourself: The moment is finally here. You approach the recruiter, introduce yourself, deliver your elevator speech, and hit a home run! You soon realize that you forgot the recruiter’s name. I’ve unfortunately been in this situation multiple times before. I’m convinced my brain isn’t wired to remember names, and I have a feeling some of you are in the same boat. My advice would be to ask for a business card while you are delivering your resume. If they do not have a business card then that is when your handy dandy notebook in your padfolio comes to your aid! After leaving the booth, take some time to write down a few notes about your conversation on the back of the business card or in the notebook. This will help immensely when you go to write follow up emails.

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Get Organized for the Career Fair this LDW

There’s a 3 day weekend on the horizon … which means plenty of time to prepare for the Career Fair on Wednesday, September 7th!  Career Fair Pro, Hallie, offers more tips on ensuring a successful Career Fair.

And so it begins… CAREER FAIR PREP SEASON! With the career fair less than a week away (Wednesday September 7th), it’s time to finally sit down and figure out how you’re going to land your dream job. Here are some quick tips for adding those finishing touches to your resume and your elevator speech—and how you’ll avoid showing up to the fair completely clueless.

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Resume Tips/ Tricks

  • Always list your events in chronological order with your most recent events at the top. Along with this idea, make sure all the internships and clubs that you are currently still involved in are written in the present tense, and all experiences that you have done in the past are in the past tense.

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  • At the top of your resume, there should be a unique header that includes your name, address, phone number, and email. If you ever need to submit a cover letter along with your resume, your cover letter should use this same header layout.
  • Make sure all of your experiences include the company/organization you worked for, the position you held, the time frame you worked there, and the city and state in which you worked. With regards to writing dates, it’s fine if you just include the month and year of your start to the month and year of your finish. For example, September 2015 – April 2016.
  • Dates and cities should be aligned to the right side of your page.
  • Don’t be afraid to mess around with the margins of your resume. But at the same time, you still want there to be a solid border of white around the whole page.  1/2″ margins around the page should be the minimum.
  • ALWAYS use black ink and print your resumes a few days in advance. You want to make sure you have at least one resume per company you plan to visit, along with five to seven extras. The Resource Room in the Union has resume paper available for a small fee, but can often run out close to the career fair date.
  • For more information on preparing your resume, review the Office of Career Management’s Resume Guide.

Elevator Speech Preparation

  • Your elevator speech will include the key points about yourself that will help start off your conversation with the recruiter. Career fairs and interviews are your time to boast about yourself, so don’t be afraid to let companies know the amazing things you’ve done!
  • Start off with a friendly hello and a firm handshake – no dead fish!

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  • Introduce yourself by stating your name, year in school, and major. Feel free to also list some of the organizations you are involved in on campus, as well as some of your past internship experiences. Even include how they may relate to the company you are speaking with.
  • Sometimes the recruiter will then turn it into a conversation and start asking you some questions about yourself, but if that doesn’t happen, don’t be afraid to continue leading the conversation and maybe ask a question of your own.
  • Companies want to know that you did your research. If you’ve seen something in the news about them recently, feel free to mention it!  Make sure it is a positive comment!
  • Lastly, direct the conversation towards the programs they might offer. If you’re a freshman or a sophomore, and they say they’re only looking at juniors, don’t be afraid to ask what your next steps should be, or what you can do in the next year or so to work towards a position with that company.

Remember, career fairs are all about networking. Ask for business cards when you’ve enjoyed your conversation with the recruiter and follow up by emailing those contacts afterwards. Although you might not always directly get an internship or job, the career fair can often set you up for a great opportunity in the future!

The First Step in Succeeding at the Career Fair is Preparation

With the Career Fair quickly approaching, Career Fair Pro, Amanda, offers advice on preparing for the Big Event!

Whether you are a senior and have attended multiple career fairs or a freshman just starting out, it is totally normal to have some anxiety about the event. The Fisher Career Fair is a great way to jump start your job and internship search. Here are some tips to help you prior to the event to make you as prepared and confident as possible!

Company Research

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A great way to start off your company research is by checking out Fisher Connect. If you have not already done so, be sure to create a profile and upload an updated version of your resume. Next, you can check out all of the companies that are going to be attending the career fair by clicking on “Career Events”, as seen below, and selecting “Fisher Fall Career Fair 2016”. From here you will be able to view all of the employers attending. Each employer has a profile which gives information about who they are, the industry they operate in, what positions they are hiring for, and majors they are looking at. I suggest looking at multiple companies in varying industries.

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Company Websites

After you have looked at the companies you are interested in, the next step is to research the company on their website. This will give you more information on their specific programs for post-graduation opportunities such as rotational programs or what their internship program consists of. This research is key for communicating with recruiters at the career fair so that you can reference and ask about their company specific programs. It would also be helpful to do some research on the company in general for instance: How did the company perform last quarter? Have there been any recent mergers or acquisitions? This information will show to the recruiter that you have an interest in the company or industry as a whole.

Preparing to Interact with a Recruiter

Think about your introduction and practice it many times before the career fair.  Start with your first name, year, major, a brief explanation of past work experience or campus involvement, and why you are interested in the company. Try to make this introduction concise because the recruiter will inquire for more information if they would like. Practice is important! Practice in front of a mirror and aloud. It will even be helpful to practice in front of a roommate or friend. Be sure to speak clearly and make eye contact, this indicates to the recruiter that you are confident in who you are and that you are qualified to work for them. Always remember to give a firm handshake.

Preparing to Attend the Career Fair

First, print off more resumes than you think you will need. At least 5 more than the number of companies you have on your list to visit. Second, look at a map of where the companies will be located and make a route. It may be helpful to start off by going to the company you are least interested in to be prepared for the companies you are really interested in. Third, plan your time accordingly. With lines and walking from company to company, be sure to allot plenty of time to attend. Lastly, bring you BuckID to get in and $1 for book bag check. You should only have your pad folio full of resumes with you during the event.

Dress for Success

The dress code is business professional, so dress to impress. This means a suit. Make sure it is clean before the day of the event. Men should wear a nice shirt and tie combo and be sure to match your belt to your shoes! Ladies be sure to wear a nice blouse under your jacket and comfortable shoes. You may want to pull your hair back to you are not tempted to twirl or play with it while talking to a recruiter. Most importantly wear a smile and let your personality shine!

 

Good Luck!

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Locking Down an Interview Before the Career Fair

With the Career Fair quickly approaching, Career Fair Pro, Luis, provides alternative tips to meeting with recruiters prior to the “big event.” 

Career Fairs can sometimes be scary; the long lines, recruiters and a professional suit that just doesn’t feel right on you. A room full of students looking for the exact same opportunities that you are. It is not a walk in the park. However, finding a job does not need to be as hard as this, especially if you are interested in working at a Fortune 100, Bank or Big 4. Would you believe me if I told you that you could have an interview locked down even before the career fair comes? Well it is possible.

The Background

While Ohio State is one of the biggest undergraduate business schools in the nation, it is constantly placing high in rankings. This combination is ideal for companies looking to recruit in the Ohio area, as these can find both high quality and vast amounts of quantity of good potential new hires. It is not a surprise then that a survey conducted by Bloomberg shows Fisher as the 7th most preferred school for recruiters in the nation. For these exact same reasons, recruiters cannot afford to limit their recruiting efforts to the career fair. They are aware that only one day a semester is not enough to find their new recruits. Because of this, companies compile a list of students that they will be sending interview invitations even before the career fair day comes. The career fair thus becomes just another opportunity for companies to interact with students, but it is not THE opportunity.

How it Works

These companies spend extensive resources into getting to know students outside career fairs; student organizations, case competitions, company workshops, and Fisher’s special programs, such as Industry Clusters, Emergent Consultants, and Fisher Futures, are just a few examples of events where companies try to reach out to students. In fact, as President of the Hispanic Business Student Association, I am constantly meeting with recruiters that are interested in attending our meetings so that they can interact with students. One of our members, for example, met JPMorgan Chase during one of our spring meetings and was later invited to a networking session in their Polaris Office.

Make it to the List

Making it to the list is not any easier than it would be at the career fair. You will still need a competitive GPA, some level of leadership experiences, and a professional attitude. However, you will not feel the same pressure as you would at the career fair, as far less students attend this networking/student organization events and you have plenty of time to share your story. If you attend more than one event where a given company is present, eventually they will start to recognize you, and by the time you see them at the career fair, you will be greeted personally.

Visit FisherU and read This Week in Schoenbaum to make sure you know when companies come around!