10 Tips and 10 Days until the Career Fair!

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015 11:30 am to 4:30 pm

  1. Double Check! Pull your suit out and check to make sure it’s in great shape. Did you just buy a new suit? Please, please, please remove the threaded “X’s” from your suit jacket or skirt in the back and cut open the pockets on pants or a jacket if they are sewn shut. Check out this YouTube link before you ruin your new suit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeHlSbJ2b04
  2. Do bring positive energy! Don’t act tired or like you don’t want to be there. You may have just raced over from your very boring two hour lecture and it’s extremely hot outside, but don’t let that show.
  3. When you talk about your work experiences, describe your accomplishments rather than your duties.
  4. REMEMBER NAMES! Nothing is worse than going in for an NDI (Next Day Interview, for those who don’t work in the best office ever…cough cough… Office of Career Management…cough cough), being asked whom you met with yesterday, and having absolutely no clue except that you think he was wearing a red tie. Pay attention to their name tag, ask for a business card, use their name while you are talking, and jot it down in your padfolio once you leave their table.
  5. Always ask for a business card at the end of your conversation, the best way to contact them, or what the next step would be. I have an app called “SamCard” which is a business card reader. I just take a quick picture of the card and it automatically uploads their information to your phone’s address book.
  6. Don’t interrupt a conversation. If an employer sees that you have no problem being rude to a fellow Buckeye, they definitely don’t want you being rude in their office.
  7. Don’t spend time with companies if you have no interest in working there. Yes, their free pens look super temping, but it’s not worth your time when someone else may be impressing the company you’ve always wanted to work for while you hunt down the place with the cool magnets.
  8. Don’t be intimidated; THEY aren’t going to walk up to the nervous looking students an awkward distance away from the table and introduce themselves, that’s YOUR job (they already have one)!
  9. Don’t use a loose fish grip as a handshake. Nothing says I have no idea what I’m doing like a terrible handshake. Make sure to practice before hand if you’re worried about this part. Also, make sure to make great eye contact. Walk up with confidence and make a killer first impression!
  10. GET EXCITED! Follow @FisherCareerMgt for last minute information about the fair!

15 Tips because it’s 15 Days Until the Career Fair

Written by Career Events Intern, Courtney Russell

Fisher Fall Career Fair

Wednesday, September 9th 2015 11:30 am to 4:30 pm

  1. Check your email! I hope you ordered a Fisher name tag from https://fisher.osu.edu/store/item.php?item_id=78, keep checking your email to see when you can pick them up in the Office of Career Management located in 150 Gerlach Hall.
  2. Attend an Internship and Job Fair prep workshop! Keep a look out for them on your OSU email account.
  3. Research, research, research… Approaching a table saying, “Hmmm what does this company do?” is probably not a great way to start off a conversation. Knowing the company shows you have initiative, are prepared and well organized.
  4. While doing your research make sure to set goals first. Write a list of personal and professional goals you wish to achieve and see how each company’s available positions and culture would fit with what you want to accomplish.
  5. Get your “1 minute commercial” ready for every employer. It’s a summary of your resume, the answer to the typical “Tell me about yourself” question and is an easy way to get any conversation going.
  6. Ask open ended questions about the company that aren’t simple “Do you have positions for accounting students” or the like just shows that you didn’t care enough to simply visit their website.
  7. Don’t be that kid standing in the middle of a very crowded aisle looking at his phone researching the company for the very first time. Study the information before the fair so you are confident when approaching an employer. Be ready with a few questions to demonstrate your knowledge and interest in the company.
  8. Make the Office of Career Management your new best friend. Schedule a QUIC interview now so that you are QUIC certified before the Career Fair.
  9. Check out what else the Office of Career Management can help you with like resume critiquing and meetings with career consultants. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZnu_RSbWw0#t=73
  10. Don’t have time to visit our office? Then look at this website to see cover letters, resumes, thank you letters and other written guides to effective and professional correspondence. http://fisher.osu.edu/offices/career-management/student-resources/undergraduate/job-search-handouts/
  11. Get connected. Update your LinkedIn for (hopefully) lots of employers to see. Remember your LinkedIn page doesn’t have to match your typical 1 page resume. Don’t be afraid to list more details than you normally would on a paper resume.
  12. Log onto FisherConnect and submit your most recent resume before September 9th!
  13. Download the OSU Career Fair+ app to research companies that will be attending the event!
  14. Don’t forget the little things! If you can’t iron your suit or you show up with wet hair it looks like you don’t have time for yourself, yet alone the company. Over 2,000 students will be showing up to this career fair, these companies have a lot to choose from- don’t make wrinkled ties or a short skirt keep you from getting an interview. And remember SMILE!
  15. Did you know that companies registered and PAID for this career fair back in June? It’s a free opportunity for Fisher students and companies know that it’s an amazing place to recruit. Be confident and take pride that you are a Buckeye!

Bloom Where You Are Planted

Greetings,

This is week 4 and I am officially half way done with the internship! This past week was a very exciting one for all of the Macy’s Store Management Interns in the North Central Region. We all had the opportunity to go out to Chicago for the Intern Summit. At this 2-day event, we get to meet the other interns, network with senior executives, understand different facets of the analytical side of Macy’s business, explore the city, and volunteer at a local food bank. Hopefully this post will give you all an idea of what we did!

planeview

Let’s go!

Day 1:
Day one was packed with events and we were always on the go. We started the day off with a warm welcome from the CEO of Macy’s, Mr. Terry Lundgren, which was given through a podcast. Mr. Lundgren provided a lot of helpful insights and answered questions that the interns had for him. The biggest takeaway for me was him telling us to, “bloom where you are planted.” Focus where you are at the time and do your job well, and people will notice you. Additionally, be curious and keep asking questions. Let people know where you want to be and what your goals are. This message gave me a lot of inspiration and motivation to finish my last 8 weeks at Macy’s with a different mindset.

welcomepackage

 

Following the podcast, we had a quick lunch courteous of Macy’s to prepare us for our next event. The team invited a few Sales Managers up from the Macy’s State Street store to give us an overview of analyzing Macy’s business through an analytical side. Friends, in retail there are a lot of numbers to look at. Every family of business, department, vendors, etc. are all broken down into numbers by the detail, and it is our job to analyze those numbers and find a solution given what we have. My team and I were assigned to the luggage department in the State Street store. We took a trip over there to analyze the entire department to see if there are any recommendations we can give based off the knowledge we have. Walking through the 9-floor store was an eye opening experience to see the size and scale of this particular store. Coming from a small store based in Cincinnati with just 4 floors of departments, this store in Chicago was a sight to see. You can see the different brands that they offer through the My Macy’s initiative, the different products they carry, and how each floor is merchandised based on the customer. Overall, the assignment and time spent in this store was a tremendous learning opportunity for us!

Macy's State Street store in Chicago

Macy’s State Street store in Chicago

After we were done in the store, all of us got on a bus and we headed to the Chicago Cubs game to enjoy the night in Chicago. It was an eventful day with many exciting opportunities to learn. Many of us were drained as we had to get ready for day two very early the next morning!

Day 2: 

cityview

Rise and shine, Chicago.

Day two was a quick one for us. We started off very early in the morning with some breakfast and a guest speaker, the DVP (District Vice President) of Chicago, Brad Poterack. He shared with us his role in Macy’s and how he got to this position. Overall, he was just a very intelligent guy with a wealth of knowledge to share with us. Thank you, Mr. Poterack!

Afterwards, we had a panel of full-time EDPs (Executive Development Program) come in to share their experiences with us at Macy’s. The EDP is the full-time position that the Store Management Interns could potentially get offered right after college. It is basically a fast-track program with a goal of getting us to the executive levels within the company. You can see all of the interns in the room switching gears and paying full attention at what the EDPs had to say. Given this opportunity, I wanted to ask the EDPs as many questions possible to learn from them, and to see if I can see myself in this position. To say the least, it was an insightful morning filled with information that directly impacts us to see if this is the right path for all of the interns!

We had a quick lunch afterwards, packed our bags, and headed to our last event of the summit. The entire team volunteered at one of Chicago’s largest food banks, the Greater Chicago Food Depository. One reason why I love working at Macy’s is their culture of always giving back to the community. At Macy’s, we strongly believe in the value of giving back to the communities of where we live and work. That is why in 2013, Macy’s Inc. giving exceeded $73 million and 134,000 volunteer hours of community service! That is incredible, and it goes to show that giving back is always in fashion at Macy’s.

At the food bank, our team was assigned to pack apples, carrots, and potatoes. Within 2 hours or so, our team packed a total of 12,488 lbs of apples, carrots, and potatoes. We worked hard, bonded with each other, and had fun while doing it. Definitely a great way to end the 2-day Intern Summit with Macy’s.

chicagofoodbank

The entire North Central Region Interns, Chicago 2015.

Hopefully this post provided some insights on what we did in Chicago! I will end with this quote that was brought up during one of our sessions:

“Learn to be comfortable with being uncomfortable.”

Until next time,
Justin

 

Seeing How Others Perform

Hello all,

Week 3 at Macy’s went by fast! I am slowly grasping how the business operates day-to-day and understanding more about the retail world. You know how people say the retail world is “fast-paced”? I am finding that out firsthand. There is so much to learn at first, and it may seem hard to keep up with all of the information. Everyone learns differently, but for me, I learn the most efficiently by seeing and experiencing it, as well as learning from others. That is why I was so glad to find out that Macy’s incorporated a weekly Talking SHOP (Seeing How Others Perform) with various people within the company. This activity requires me to network with other employees from sales associates to district executives. It is quite simple actually. You take time out of your day to sit down with them, talk with them, ask them questions, listen to their experiences, ask for feedback and advice, and then shadow them if time permitted. It is amazing how much you can actually learn from one individual. These are people who have been working at Macy’s for awhile now, and have been very successful every step of the way. I had to seize the opportunity to pick their brains and apply them throughout my internship. This week I had the opportunity to do a Talking SHOP with my sales associates, the district director of human resources, and also the store manager. The feedback and advice that they provided is invaluable and it gave me a sense of motivation to go above and beyond.

I encourage all of you to constantly do a Talking SHOP wherever you are. Even if your company doesn’t give you a platform to do this, like Macy’s does, go out and do it yourself! You will have the opportunity to meet so many successful individuals in your every day life and in your work place. Grasp the opportunity to learn and see how they perform, what they are doing right, and apply all of that into your daily tasks and routines. You will be amazed at how much you can learn.

Other than that, I am preparing for next week here at Macy’s! It is going to be a big week as all of the interns in the North Central Region will be traveling to Chicago for an intern summit. I am stoked for this opportunity, so stay tuned next week for more updates!

All the best,
Justin

Getting an Offer

Some companies have a structured system for how they treat internships during the actual internship and after the internship in the form of giving offers.  For example, (and I know this from living with two P&G interns) P&G will contact their interns going into their senior year of college to let them know if they are getting a job offer or not (the timing of the call is different depending on the department).  At P&G, there is a structure on how to handle all of the talented interns that just finished their summer at P&G.  At Luxottica, there’s no structure.  There’s no formal offer/offer call and getting an extension for your internship fully depends on the brand team that you are on. At companies like Lux, it’s completely on you to take the reins and steer the conversation toward full time employment if that’s something you are interested in.  Here’s some tips on how to do that:

  1. Ask your recruiter or your contact in HR when they normally do recruiting for full time hires. Recruiters are in charge of filling any opening throughout the company.  Getting to know people in the HR department and letting them know you’re interested is a good first step in getting a full time job.  Make sure to ask your recruiter how often you should keep in touch with them and what you can do in your senior year to make yourself more marketable.
  2. Bring up the full time hire conversation with your manager. Your manager knows your work better than anyone else at the company and is the best reference to recommend you to get an offer in your department or to recommend you to someone in another department in the company.
  3. Keep in touch. This is the tip that seems the most obvious, but it’s one that you can easily forget to do as time goes on.  The HR professionals that I met with throughout the summer recommended sending out an email to HR once a month and an email to your manager once every one to two months to stay in contact.  It’s even better if you can connect your email to something that relevant with the business.  For example, from my work this summer, I know that I certain marketing campaign will take place later in the year, so when I email my manager I’m going to be sure to ask about that campaign.