Posts Tagged 'GMAT'

New GMAT section (Integrated Reasoning) scoring scale released

NextGen GMAT will be released on June 5, 2012.

I recently received an email from GMAC on the new Integrated Reasoning section of the GMAT, which will make its debut on June 5, 2012. (I wrote about the “new GMAT” in an earlier post.)

“The new Integrated Reasoning section will measure test takers’ ability to convert data in different formats and from multiple sources into meaningful information to solve problems,” said Ashok Sarathy, vice president, GMAT Program. “Although the questions include both verbal and quantitative data, our testing showed that Integrating Reasoning is a distinct skill.  We think the scores will help schools gauge these skills among their applicants.”

It appears the Integrated Reasoning section will be scored on a standalone basis – in other words, its score (from 1 to 8 ) will not affect the rest of your GMAT scores (e.g. verbal, quantitative, etc.). Click here for more information on the scoring scale on the new Integrated Reasoning section of the GMAT.

Note: If you are applying for the Fisher PhD program for autumn 2013, you may submit GMAT scores to us from either prior to or on/after June 5, 2012. GMAT scores are good for five years – either “version” of the GMAT will work for your autumn 2013 application.


The GMAT is changing in June 2012 – are you ready?

GMAT is undergoing a significant revision within the next few months. In June 2012, the GMAT will introduce an integrated reasoning section, testing concepts that have not been tested before on the GMAT. The current version of the GMAT has a verbal section, a quantitative section, and two essays. The new version will drop one of the essays and replace it with an integrated reasoning section.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJLwiwRsQAM

What does this mean for you? If you are reading this and are applying to the Fisher PhD program for autumn 2013, you can either take the GMAT before or after the changes are implemented – the program does not prefer one over the other. As long as your scores are valid scores, they can be used as part of a complete application. Remember that scores are good for up to five years from the time you take it so if you took it in February 2012 for your autumn 2013 application, those scores will be valid for your autumn 2013 application.

For more information, please check the FAQ published by GMAC. (Click here if you’d like to see some sample questions from the new integrated reasoning section.)


Not happy with your GMAT score? Here is some advice.

You are preparing your application to the PhD program.  You completed the online application, wrote, rewrote and finalized your essays, secured your letters of recommendation, updated your resume and requested your transcripts to be sent.  The last item on the checklist is every PhD applicant’s favorite four-letter word … the GMAT.  You took the GMAT, thinking you were going to ace it after all of those hours of intense preparation.  You finished the exam, agreed to view your scores and … oh, MAN, you have got to be kidding me?!  THAT is my score?

Sound familiar?

If this sounds like you and you are planning to apply by the December 17 deadline, you have a couple of choices:

1) Apply as planned and wait to hear from the Admissions Committee regarding next steps in the admissions process – maybe your score isn’t as high as you had hoped, but maybe it isn’t that bad after all.

2) Apply as planned, but indicate to the Admissions Committee that you plan to retake the test on a future date and request that a decision is not made on your application until we receive your new test scores.

A few points to remember:

  • The Admissions Committee will review all of the application materials carefully.  The GMAT is important, but it is just one part of the application.
  • The GMAT was designed to help business schools determine your potential to succeed academically in Fisher PhD coursework.  It is possible that you have enough other evidence in your application of strong academic potential and the GMAT may be relatively less important.
  • Be self aware – look at our current class profile.  Are your qualifications consistent with those of other students in our program?  Manage your expectations.
  • If you are interested in being considered for merit-based financial aid, the two quantitative measures primarily used to evaluate candidates are the undergraduate GPA and the GMAT.  Most of you are unable to impact your undergraduate GPA at this point.  If you feel that your GMAT score is sufficient for admission, but you believe you have the potential to do better, it may be worthwhile to retake for the possibility of funding.
  • If someone gets a better score by retaking the GMAT, the average increase on a GMAT retake is 30 points.  Most people actually perform the same or do worse.  We only recommend that you retake the test if the circumstances around the test day were not ideal or if you have some reason to believe that you did not perform to your maximum potential.
  • If you do plan to retake, give yourself plenty of time.  We recommend about 6-8 weeks of preparation – don’t rush into it before you are ready!

Good luck!!

You can do it!


Scared of the GMAT? Don’t Be! Join us to learn more.

We understand that for many people, GMAT is a dreaded four-letter word. It doesn’t have to be. You CAN beat the GMAT (or at least conquer your fears) and we’ll show you how. Join us for one of our GMAT information sessions on the Fisher campus. Hosted by our very friendly and knowledgeable GMAC representative, Eric C., these information sessions are designed to introduce you to the not-so-scary test and give you tips for succeeding on the exam. These session are open to anyone who is interested in learning about the exam, regardless of the graduate degree you may be seeking. Select “GMAT Information Session” in the drop-down menu of the Registration page to sign up now! Visit go.osu.edu/nX.


Here’s your checklist for applying

When you are preparing your application for any of the Fisher PhD programs, please refer to the checklist of required items. Remember that the admissions committee will only review complete applications.

Here are some additional tips:

GMAT/GRE

It is very OK for you to submit your application prior to taking the GMAT or GRE. (If you are applying to the accounting PhD program, you must submit official GMAT scores.) Just be sure you take the GMAT/GRE by December 15, 2010 to meet the PhD program application deadline.

Transcripts

We need two official transcripts from each and every university you have attended. Even if you just took a single class at a local community college, we will need two official transcripts from that community college. Be sure to send them to the correct address:

PhD ADMISSIONS
Fisher College of Business
100 Gerlach Hall
2108 Neil Ave
Columbus OH 43210-1144

Note: You are NOT required to submit transcripts for any grades you earned at Ohio State University.

TOEFL

I plan on writing another blog post on issues involving the TOEFL but if you are required to submit the TOEFL as part of a complete application, be sure you use the correct institution code for Ohio State University (1592) and that you allow PLENTY of time for the scores to get to us. The TOEFL is regularly the one item that seems to take forever to get to us – if you need to submit the TOEFL, it is your responsibility to ensure the test administrator (ETS) sends us your official TOEFL scores.

References

Your references can be sent to us electronically or via paper. (Additional instructions are in the application on the difference between the two formats.) Note that we will receive your references sooner if you choose electronic. Just be sure to give your recommenders plenty of time to write your references!

Essays

Give yourself enough time to write essays that really reflect you. Do not write generic, plain vanilla essays. Answer the questions that are posed to you in this application. Do not recycle essay responses you are using for any other applications.

We will be posting additional tips for each of the items referenced above throughout the next few months so keep an eye on this blog for updates.

If you have any questions, please let us know!