COE’s ‘world café’ event going for round two

Last February, the Center for Operational Excellence teamed up with Fisher’s Operations and Logistics Management Association for its first-ever attempt at a “world café”-style event. For a few hours, we brought together COE members, Fisher students and faculty to tackle the topic of logistics in an actionable way – with a catch. The clock ticks during discussion sessions at each table, and when it runs out the groups scramble.

Last year’s World Cafe attracted dozens of industry leaders,

The first time out of the gate, the event was a huge success – and that’s why we’re hosting it again this year. Next Friday, Jan. 25, we’re hosting what we’re calling a Link Symposium, and while the name and the chief topic have changed, the format’s all the same. The spotlight this year will be turned on sales and operations planning.

Move around the tables, meet students and faculty and watch as our best and brightest at Fisher give report-outs on key takeaways from each subtopic. We’re also capping off the event with a networking period to give our attendees a chance to chat without the pressure of time.

Seats are still available – so join us by registering here.

 

 

MBOE recap: Graduation day

“Remember that you have the best knowledge, and you learned from the best.”

These words came from a student wrapping up her capstone project for Fisher’s industry MBOE program, which ended its third intense and exhilarating year Saturday. This group of doctors, nurses, plant managers and administrators learned and shared principles of lean and applied them at their workplace, changing the way that work is done.

And this weekend they made it, walking away with a degree that’s one-of-a-kind in the U.S. Many sacrifices were involved. Instead of taking their kids to the zoo or going out for dinner with spouses and family, they worked on their six-sigma modules. They gave more than 600 hours this year for their professional development, making a positive change at their workplaces. Their projects were aimed at making shop floors and hospital units safer and easier for employees to use, resulting in satisfied customers/patients and a positive bottom-line impact. That learning, guided by some of the best coaches in the country, spread to others that they, in turn, taught.

MBOE Graduation
Fisher’s industry MBOE cohort at commencement

Some snapshots of the final moments of the MBOE cohort:

The management team from the Evansville school system in Indiana raved about how they successfully made big and small changes. Speaking of the MBOE program, one leader suggested that companies should work “to get your whole team in the program and you will see the widespread improvements.” I have not seen such open-minded executives who are willing to change first before making changes to their organization.

Two students – Dale Scott, lean manager at GE Technology Infrastructure; and Michael Raisor, executive director of process improvement at the Evansville school system – spoke at the pre-commencement session in the evening, an emotional tribute to the camaraderie in the class and the support they received.  Helen Zak, president of the Healthcare Value Leaders Network, inspired students to make use of the knowledge and think about how they’ll use all the extra time now that school is over.

The students expressed their gratitude for the knowledge they acquired from the faculty and coaches by giving a gift and coffee mugs imprinted with one important takeaway: Without data, you’re just another person with an opinion.

With this cohort finished, the next wave revs up early next year. We’ve already written about the first on-campus week for our new health-care cohort. Check out a podcast from earlier this year where I chat with Mark Graban of LeanBlog.org for more details.

New operational excellence program at Fisher makes big debut

Excitement is high this week at the Fisher College of Business as we launch the first cohort of our MBOE Healthcare Program. MBOE, by the way, stands for Master of Business Operational Excellence, a program we introduced three years ago with a group of students mostly from the manufacturing and service industries. In the last cohort, however, we noticed nearly half of the students were from the health-care sector – and what we did about it is this very program.

Dean Poon
Dean Poon speaking to the MBOE class

MBOE Healthcare is a one-year program focused on achieving operational excellence using lean and Six Sigma, combined with effective leadership skills and team engagement techniques. The program aims to develop each student – a manager, leader or other professional with a passion for operational excellence and change –  while improving the systems and processes in his or her organization. 

This MBOE program isn’t just in a classroom. Students will head to hospitals to visit the gembaand observe successful changes. They’ll also take part in online learning and a combination of on-site and distance coaching by industry experts. The students apply this knowledge to a strategic capstone project carefully selected with the active involvement of the student’s supervisor or sponsor. They also work closely with the original industry cohort in the four weeks they’re together on campus to learn from each other.

MBOE Students

Each of the eight weeks on campus involves four full days of intense learning from Wednesday to Saturday. Past students have called these weeks “exhausting and exhilarating” as experienced faculty members and guests teach using their own experiences working in organizations all over the country.

A student of class 2011, Susan Moffatt-Bruce, Assistant Professor of Surgery and Chief Quality and Patient Safety Officer at the Ohio State University Medical Center, told me the program “has provided me the tools to implement change through shared understanding and team engagement.”

Stay tuned for a daily update on the first week of the MBOE program.