Upcoming supply chain event keynote wins major industry award

Don’t just take it from us that our featured keynote for next month’s Center for Operational Excellence supply chain event is a big deal.

chris caplice
Chris Caplice

The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals at its annual conference in Orlando this week awarded Dr. Chris Caplice the Distinguished Service Award, the most prestigious honor around for supply chain professionals. Caplice, the executive director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Transportation and Logistics, is the keynote at COE’s Oct. 21 supply chain forum. Registration is open now, though seating is restricted to employees of COE member companies.

Speaking of Caplice, CSCMP CEO Rick Blasgen said that Caplice “from his involvement in education, to his innovative work in identifying and developing technologies that have contributed to the improved efficiency and effectiveness of transportation, logistics, and supply chain processes … has had a dramatic impact in shaping the supply chain discipline as we know it.”

Caplice has contributed to our growing knowledge on supply chain management from the industry and academic side, placing himself in what CSCMP calls an elite group. In addition to his MIT role, he has worked at Logistics.com, Sabre Holdings, the Virginia Military Institute and the U.S. Army, where he served as an officer.

At COE’s event next month, Caplice is addressing a serious challenge for many organizations today, which lack supply chain designs that can suitably adapt to disruptions. He’ll be highlighting four oncoming trends – miniaturization, virtualization, decentralization and digitization – that will alter the competitive landscape as companies devise new ways to serve their customers. This session will provide supply chain managers and others with new insights as they rethink assumptions in their partner selection, distribution network design, and chosen service platforms.

Read more about the event here or register now.

‘Joy Inc.’ author, former summit keynote Sheridan returning in May

Miss last year’s Leading Through Excellence summit? Looking to revisit one of our most popular keynotes?

Rich Sheridan during his keynote at Leading Through Excellence 2015
Rich Sheridan during his keynote at Leading Through Excellence 2015

The Center for Operational Excellence is partnering with Fisher College of Business’ Master of Business Operational Excellence program to bring to campus Rich Sheridan, CEO of award-winning software developer Menlo Innovations LLC and author of Joy Inc. Employees of COE member companies are invited to join MBOE program alumni the morning of Friday, May 13, for a keynote by Sheridan, who kicked off the 2015 Leading Through Excellence summit and led a half-day workshop.

A programmer by trade, Sheridan entered the corporate world and found at the midpoint of his career that he no longer experienced the joy that had drawn him to the industry. After losing his job as a software development executive when the dot-com bubble burst, he founded Menlo Innovations in 2001, saying the company’s purpose was to “bring joy to the world through software.” Menlo has gone on to win the Alfred P. Sloan award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility for eight straight years and has earned five revenue awards from Inc. magazine.

In his keynote, based on Joy Inc., Sheridan will offer an inside look at the culture that’s flourished at Menlo over the last 15 years that leverages visual management, an open and collaborative workspace, and a “fail fast” ethos that has garnered attention nationwide. All attendees will receive a complimentary copy of Sheridan’s book, Joy Inc.

Click here to register for this limited-capacity event.

Upcoming women’s event explores communicating, connecting in digital age

The rapidly evolving digital world is changing how we communicate, how we process information, and even how we add and network with members in our organizations, raising many questions:

Is my LinkedIn profile opening or closing doors? Are my internal presentations truly selling my ideas for change? What can I look at online when hiring a candidate? How can I build a value-adding network with other women in my organization?

We’re tackling all these questions next Friday, June 26, with a dynamic trio of speakers bringing the latest best practices in digital communication and the development of corporate women’s networks. Featured at this members-only Women’s Leadership Forum are:

debra jasperDebra Jasper, founder, Mindset Digital (10 a.m.) – Jasper in this opening session will share her insights on the biggest shifts in digital communication, highlighting new ways to showcase expertise and determine what’s most essential to convey as attention spans shrink, whether managing up or down. She’ll chart the course for helping women leaders create powerful messages and connections inside their organizations and across the broader business community, offering vital advice on managing your “digital footprint.”

kailee gooldKailee Goold, attorney, Kegler Brown Hill + Ritter (11:15 a.m.) – Goold leverages her legal expertise to walk attendees through practical considerations that arise amid the rising use of social media in the workplace. That extends to using social media during hiring decisions, managing employees’ use of social media, and workplace liability issues.

mike kaufmannMike Kaufmann, CFO, Cardinal Health Inc. (1:30 p.m.) – Following a networking lunch, Kaufmann will take the stage to share his experiences as the executive sponsor of Cardinal’s women’s network group. Using the success of Cardinal’s network as a healthy and innovative one for employees, Kaufmann will offer up key advice for other companies, including engaging men – a unique approach that is gaining popularity in corporate America.

This event, open only to employees of COE member companies, has limited seating available. Click here to register.

March event explores intersection of supply chain risk, process excellence

“Bullet-proof” and lean: Is it possible?

In managing the business relationships that flow downstream to the customer, companies are honing their risk management practices to reduce vulnerability and bolster continuity. Battling risk, however, often leads to built-in redundancies and other measures that run counter to lean principles. How, then, can an organization with a legacy of lean, robust processes reduce its risk profile without turning back the clock on progress?

pat sample ge aviation
P. Sample

Join the Center for Operational Excellence next Thursday, March 12, in Pfahl Hall for an all-day forum, Running the Risk: The Future of Supply Chain Excellence, that features leaders from two global organizations. Kicking off the event is Patrick Sample (pictured, right), manager of SCD planning, supply chain – materials, at GE Aviation. Sample will be co-presenting with award-winning supply chain researcher and professor Tom Goldsby on their progress in balancing these two crucial priorities at the $22 billion-a-year company.

GE Aviation is the second-largest subsidiary of conglomerate General Electric, a $22 billion-a-year business that is one of the world’s leading makers of jet engines and related services. The company has operations on four continents around the world, which link to a massive supply chain network.

GE Aviation has proven progressive in tracing its supply chains all the way back to raw material extraction. In doing so, it uncovered a dependency on rare-earth minerals sourced almost entirely in China and has since sought to “engineer out” these materials in their engine components. The division also leads the way in the adoption of additive manufacturing techniques using 3-D printers for critical engine parts. By the year 2020, GE Aviation expects to produce more than 100,000 parts through these innovative manufacturing techniques. The company has taken these measures against the backdrop of their operational excellence heritage, rich in lean and six sigma practices.

Also featured is Elizabeth VanBodegraven, director of global procurement for the Logistics North America organization of chemical maker Momentive. VanBodegraven, drawing upon her two decades in procurement and supply chain roles, will be examining a crucial question companies face today: Whether the cost of risk management truly exceeds running the risk.

In addition to the dual keynotes, Running the Risk will feature a networking lunch; an interactive, group-based scenario that explores balancing risk management in operations; and a wrap-up panel discussion.

This members-only event, registration for which is available now, is a “must” for any individual or team interested in what place risk management has in the future of operational excellence.

Agenda

  • 8:30 a.m. – Registration opens
  • 9 a.m. – Presentation: Patrick Sample, GE Aviation; and Tom Goldsby, Fisher College of Business
  • 10:15 a.m. – Networking break
  • 10:30 a.m. – Presentation: Risk Management’s Cost: More Than Running the Risk?, Elizabeth VanBodegraven, Momentive
  • 11:45 a.m. – Lunch
  • 1 p.m. – Interactive, group-based risk management scenarios
  • 2:30 p.m. – Panel discussion
  • 3:30 p.m. – Event concludes

    Register an individual or group now

Webinar explores challenges, payoffs of electronic communications

Connecting far-flung employees – across an office or across the globe – is becoming an increasingly common challenge for companies of any size. A number of organizations have turned to technological solutions for town halls, top leadership updates and team meetings – but how can they ensure communication leads to results and isn’t lost along the way?

mills jamesThe Center for Operational Excellence is thrilled to partner with member Mills James to offer a hybrid case study / discussion panel webinar featuring leaders from two of the largest companies in Ohio who have successfully embedded technology into their communication efforts: Procter & Gamble and Cardinal Health.

Joining the webcast on Friday, Nov. 14, from noon to 1 p.m. EST from P&G is Kip Fanta, associate director of Employee Experience/Meetings and Collaboration, an employee of the Cincinnati-based consumer products giant for more than 20 years who has worked in a variety of roles. From Cardinal Health is Eileen Lehmann, who directs internal communications and oversees the application of technology to communications problems.

Fanta and Lehmann will be joined by Mills James VP Bruce Reid and COE Executive Director Peg Pennington.

This isn’t a webinar about what technology your organization should choose – it’s an exploration of how these can be used to drive employee engagement, align an organization with strategic goals and drive results in the short and long term. Participants will offer their insights on what worked, what didn’t, and how companies of any size can take action.

Click here to register for the webinar.

Upcoming innovation event features leading R&D researcher, Goodyear HQ tour

Since the 2008 recession, organizations are pushing their research and development departments to the brink, seeking the same, or greater, levels of innovation at the same, or lower, amounts of funding. At the same time, an unprecedented level of connection across the global supply chain has brought competition to a frenzied peak, pushing companies to the brink and forcing them to efficiently work with global teams.

In this “new normal” for R&D, how can managers meet the demands of top-rung leadership and the market itself?

A. Chandrasekaran
A. Chandrasekaran

The Center for Operational Excellence is partnering with the Fisher College of Business Department of Managing Sciences to host award-winning Prof. Aravind Chandrasekaran (right) on Wednesday, Oct. 29, for an “Innovation Day” workshop. Prof. Chandrasekaran will share the results of his years of collaboration with top global innovators in a range of industries, presenting original research that answers critical R&D questions, chiefly:

  • How can I best manage R&D teams and align incentives to achieve the type of innovation I’m pursuing?
  • How do I know when to involve suppliers and other non-internal partners innovation, and when can that hurt, rather than help?
  • What are the challenges involved in working with partners based around the globe, and how can I manage them?

This members-only Innovation Day event includes the exclusive workshop with Prof. Chandrasekaran, catered lunch, discussion panel and guided online simulation that sheds light on how to manage disruptive innovation with finite resources. This session is limited to 40 total attendees with a maximum of five registrants per COE member company.

Make it a two-day experience at Goodyear’s HQ

GoodyearMoreDrivenLogo[1]COE is thrilled to offer an optional second-day event to the innovation workshop: An exclusive presentation and tour at Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.’s Akron headquarters on Thursday, Oct. 30. In the morning, Goodyear Senior Master Black Belt Norbert Majerus will share how the company has embedded lean product development principles throughout its R&D operation. Following lunch, attendees will embark on a tour of the company’s Akron campus, Operations Management Center, and Knowledge and Project Management division.

At the Operations Management Center, attendees will get an inside look at how Goodyear has implemented visual management as it works to develop and turn out a staggering 1,500 tire SKUs a year. In the Knowledge and Project Management division, attendees will see how the company has created standard work for projects. The company’s new campus, meanwhile, highlights how a continued drive to be collaborative and focus on the customer have influenced a multimillion-dollar construction project.

This tour, limited to 20 participants, requires attendees to provide their own transportation to and from the Goodyear campus but includes a catered lunch.

To register your company for the Innovation Day session and/or the Goodyear tour, click here.

Agenda (subject to minor changes):

Wednesday, Oct. 29

  • 9:30 a.m.: Registration / Continental breakfast
  • 10 – 11:30 a.m.: Presentation, Prof. Aravind Chandrasekaran
  • 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: Networking lunch
  • 12:30 – 2:30 p.m.: Back Bay Battery Simulation
  • 2:30 – 4 p.m.: Discussion panel
  • 4-5:30 p.m.: Cocktail reception

Thursday, Oct. 30

  • 10:15 a.m.: Check-in in Goodyear lobby
  • 10:30 to noon: “Lean Product Development Principles at Goodyear,” Norbert Majerus
  • Noon to 1 p.m.: Catered lunch
  • 1 to 3 p.m.: Goodyear tour

Author Karen Martin appearing in August to talk ‘leadership imperative’ for value-stream mapping

Even the best organizations don’t see outside their four walls sometimes, and those in search of the big picture often turn to value-stream mapping.

As a tool in the lean transformation arsenal, value-stream mapping is a tried-and-true approach to finding bottlenecks, redundancies and other problems in the product or service’s journey to the end customer. What far too few companies realize, however, is that value-stream mapping can be a great catalyst for changing leadership behavior to support and sustain a lean culture.

Karen Martin
Karen Martin

So once the value-stream mapping skills are learned, how can companies make that crucial leap to leverage them for transforming leadership thinking? COE is thrilled to welcome award-winning author and renowned speaker Karen Martin to campus on Friday, Aug. 15, to share her perspective on how it’s done in an exclusive members-only event.

Karen leads The Karen Martin Group Inc., which has been working with organizations to achieve both large-scale business transformation and more process improvement for more than 20 years and has specialized in lean management practices since 2000. Most recently, Martin is the co-author of Value Stream Mapping, the book she’ll be presenting on in August that lean turnaround legend Art Byrne has called “the new bible for value stream mapping.”

A scientist by trade, she began her work in quality and process improvement by serving as director of quality improvement for a large health-care management organization and director of San Diego State University’s Institute for Quality and Productivity. A sought-after speaker and consultant, Karen is the author of The Outstanding Organization, winner of the prestigious Shingo Research and Professional Publication Award, and has co-authored The Kaizen Event Planner and Metrics-Based Process Mapping: An Excel-Based Solution.

Karen is speaking from 10 a.m. to noon in Pfahl Hall at the Fisher College of Business as part of the school’s annual reunion of students in the Master of Business Operational Excellence program. COE members who attend the event will get a chance to network with alums of the one-year master’s program and, in a post-presentation event co-hosted by Barnes & Noble, purchase Value Stream Mapping and/or The Outstanding Organization and stick around for a signing.

Seating is limited, so be sure to register now!

COE-sponsored panel gives Fisher grad students a deeper look at lean

The first- and second-year Fisher College of Business graduate students who attended last Friday’s third-annual Link Symposium didn’t have to wait long to hear sound advice from our panel on lean implementation.

From left: Georgia Keresty; Asst. Prof. Aravind Chandrasekaran, Fisher College of Business; Chris Dillinger, Cardinal Health; Bill Michael, Huntington Bank; Reshma Pathare, Nationwide Insurance.

Moderating the event was Georgia Keresty, vice president of science, technology, and quality at Johnson & Johnson’s Advanced Sterilization Products. A 30-year veteran of the health-care industry, Keresty made the case for an enterprise-wide approach to lean in the opening moments of her remarks, kicking off a wide-ranging discussion on how lean is driving lasting, transformational change at a wide range of organizations.

“For companies to be successful with lean, it has to be end-to-end,” she said, adding that a more myopic approach to implementation can mean a company is “missing out on huge opportunities.”

The ensuing pair of panel discussions reinforced Keresty’s comments with a look inside manufacturers Greif and Emerson Climate Technologies, health-care product distributor Cardinal Health, Huntington National Bank, and Nationwide Insurance. Fisher professors Peter Ward, Mike Tanner, and Aravind Chandrasekaran also were on hand to share their research-based insights at the symposium, which the Center for Operational Excellence sponsors each year. View a slide show of the event here.

Teaching the tools and behavior that bolster lean thinking and leadership isn’t anything new for Fisher, which has been teaching lean in its MBA program for 25 years running, Ward said. To put that in context, the landmark lean text The Machine That Changed the World hit bookshelves only 23 years ago.

Notable insights from the panels, which focused on lean in manufacturing and services, respectively:

Lean leadership can be a career game-changer. One of the panelists, Geoff Merchant, serves as the manager of global commercial excellence for Delaware-based Greif, a member of our Center for Operational Excellence. He’s also an alumnus of Fisher’s MBA program. “The lean skillset I developed at Fisher was key to me getting a position at Greif and doing well in the organization.”

Lean can’t survive on an island. Bill Michael, a continuous improvement consultant at Huntington, told students that the bank has come a long way from a more siloed approach to lean, a series of “little embedded random acts of continuous improvement. This needs to be one cultural force.”

Lean can help organizations build quality in. This strategy has helped Cardinal Health successfully manage a wide range of challenges in the heavily regulated health-care space. It has even helped panelist Chris Dillinger, a director of operational excellence, view regulations themselves differenty. “A regulatory requirement is a voice of the customer,” Dillinger said.

A lean culture has many ingredients. Five of those pinpointed by the services panel: Respect, trust, empowerment, end-to-end application, and teamwork.

“Lean is a systematic way of showing respect.” – Peter Ward, chair, Department of Management Sciences; co-director, COE

Are your meetings a waste of valuable time?

itln crowd

McKinsey & Co. Partner Krish Krishnakanthan shared a number of sharp insights about the application of lean principles to the world of information technology, but what seemed to resonate the most were his thoughts on how we view two very important features of any organization: Meetings and managers.

krishnakanthan mckinseyMeetings, Krishnakanthan (pictured) told a crowd of 80 at last week’s IT Leadership Network forum, often serve the function of an all-hands-on-deck “firefighting” session. Here, issues that could be resolved on individual team members’ time instead are tackled en masse, contributing very little value or eroding what value there is.

“Staff meetings truly have become problem-solving meetings, not status-reporting meetings,” Krishnakanthan said.

Check out photos from the event here.

Where organizations often fail to contain much-dreaded waste in processes, he said, is in firmly establishing objectives among individual team members and leveraging “huddles” or meetings for valuable communication – not triage.

This same attraction to firefighting, Krishnakthanthan said, has seeped into the role of managers. These leaders, he said, should find themselves coaching their teams to develop the skills they need to solve problems – not solve the problems themselves.

“Most managers, though, would love to just solve the problem,” Krishnakanthan said, “and they get rewarded for this. A reward system must be built to reward really good problem solvers, not crisis managers.”

The key, he said, is to be a leader who knows how to ask the right questions, not jump to provide the answer.

Krishnakanthan was the featured speaker at COE’s sixth forum in its IT Leadership Network series, which began with a visit from Lean IT co-author Mike Orzen in April 2012. Check out go.osu.edu/ITLN for a look at past speakers and our upcoming events.

COE women ‘lean in’ at book discussion

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s bestselling book Lean In didn’t so much create buzz in the biz-book world as it did a jet-engine roar. Nearly six months after its release, Lean In seems still as talked-about as ever – so much so that at least a few of our member companies are hosting ongoing discussions centered on the blockbuster.

Sandberg’s manifesto and its subtly powerful stance – that in a male-dominated world, women unwittingly hold themselves back too – resonated with us at the Center for Operational Excellence. And like some of our member companies, we decided to do something about it.

lean in women
Topics at COE’s “Lean In” discussion included “The Search for 50/50” and “Are You My Mentor?”

Last week we hosted an experimental “book club” discussion on Lean In featuring more than 50 women from COE member companies. Instead of a panel or a “breakout” into small groups, we decided to make a cocktail out of them both: Eight tables, eight topics, eight facilitators, and 15 minutes for a group to share their thoughts before the next rotation.

Click here for a look at photos from the event.

We’re thrilled with the results of our round-robin book club, which provoked some provocative discussions on topics that are crucial to our professional and personal lives, but not always easy to talk about: Self-doubt, career mobility, finding balance with a partner, parental guilt, and a number of others.

Some of the women who attended wrote down their thoughts during the discussions, and we thought we’d share some of the best:

“Accept that there will be guilt” – This, from our table on “Raising Future Leaders,” echoes Sandberg’s own struggles with being a working parent.

“Expectations are an invitation to resentment.”

“Are you an arsonist at your own fire?” – This, at our table on finding balance with a partner.

“Have difficult conversations now!”

And, an audience favorite: “Laundry is always a problem.”