Fisher centers’ collaborative series shines spotlight on ‘talent war’

Fisher College of Business’ research and business partnership centers might be individually focused on an eclectic range of themes, but finding common ground is easy when it comes to today’s toughest business challenges.

A group of four Fisher centers teamed up this summer to tackle two of the biggest challenges companies face today: growing and developing talent, and unlocking the power of data and digital disruption. Nearly 150 members and guests of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Center for Operational Excellence, National Center for the Middle Market and The Risk Institute gathered in July for a deep dive into winning the “talent war,” with the disruption-focused follow-up set for Wednesday, August 16.

The big picture

Keynote speaker Marek Gootman of the Brookings Institution

The July “Winning the Talent War” session turned a spotlight on some of the key issues employers are facing as they match the supply in the talent pool with their hiring needs. A region’s talent pool, keynote and Brookings Institution Fellow Marek Gootman told the crowd, is nothing short of the key to its vitality.

“One of the things that connects everyone is where we’re pooling our talent from,” he said, “and talent is a key driver of economic competitiveness.”

Harnessing the potential of the labor pool today, however, means facing serious headwinds, Gootman said. For one, employers are demanding more workers with a college education despite the fact that many out-of-work members of the labor pool don’t have more than a high school education. A recent Brookings analysis of 130 population centers by county – among them Columbus’ Franklin County – found that 55 percent of those out of work have, at most, a high school degree, while only 20 percent have a bachelor’s degree. In Franklin County, that gap is even wider.

Brookings, a research partner with Fisher’s middle market center, is an advocate for workforce programs – apprenticeships and social enterprise initiatives, to name a few – that can help solve this supply-demand imbalance. And with technology’s reach extending these days to traditionally “non-digital” jobs, building workforce skill in this area is quickly taking on critical importance, Gootman said.

“This is something that everyone, large and small, is going to be grappling with,” he said.

While these challenges might prove formidable to larger companies, they can be downright crippling to the middle market sector, whose companies create 60 percent of the country’s new jobs but can lack the capacity or perspective to reach outside their four walls for workforce help. New survey data Brookings compiled with the Fisher middle-market center and released at the session showed the sector’s firms struggling to hire for needed skills, underinvesting in talent planning and facing intense competition from larger companies.

By moving from an adversarial relationship to one that’s focused on building a better region, middle-market firms and larger companies can join forces and better leverage support from the public sector, Gootman said.

“You’re reliant on these mid-sized firms for the economic vitality of the region,” he told the crowd. “Large firms can find their own value in working with the middle market.”

The ground war

talent war panel
The discussion panel, moderated by Fisher Prof. Marc Ankerman, featured HR leaders from Cardinal Health, Marathon Petroleum, Nationwide and Wendy’s.

Shifting demographics and an explosion of digital technology are very much on the minds of top talent leaders at some of Ohio’s biggest brands, who joined Fisher Prof. Marc Ankerman for a panel discussion following Gootman’s keynote. In a wide-ranging question-and-answer session, human resources leaders from Cardinal Health, Marathon Petroleum, Nationwide and Wendy’s Co. grappled with the challenges ahead.

At Nationwide, a top Columbus-area employer, process automation and the rise of driverless cars are two technology-centered trends likely to disrupt not only the company’s base of 10,000 call-center associates – but the insurance models at the heart of its business, said Kathy Smith, the insurer’s VP of talent development. The oldest business represented on the panel – 125-year-old Marathon Petroleum – is similarly bracing for technological upheaval, but also investing in readying its existing workforce for it.

“We’re really focusing on repurposing our workers’ skills and preparing them to learn automated technology,” said Tony Moore, head of talent acquisition.

Technology is even transforming the hiring processes at the heart of human resources, said Will Shepherd, Wendy’s director of enterprise learning and development.

“We’re having to meet applicants where they are from a technological standpoint, and recruiters are stepping that up,” he said.

No matter what technological leaps are around the corner, panelists told the crowd they still have an eye on the kinds of capabilities that won’t show up on a resume, Smith of Nationwide highlighting collaboration and “emotional intelligence” as critical.

“We need to continue to build skills in the hard stuff,” said Kelly Wilson, VP of talent management at Cardinal Health, “but the soft skills are so important.”

Coming up

The collaborative summer sessions continue with a look at data and digital disruption on Wednesday, Aug. 16, featuring speakers from Cisco, Safelite Group, Columbus-based data analytics startup FactGem and the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law’s Program on Data Governance.

Seats allotted for COE are currently full but employees of member companies may join the waitlist for the seats by e-mailing Jackie McClure at mcclure.92@osu.edu. More spaces are expected to be released to the center the week of July 31, and those will first be extended to waitlisted attendees.

July summer session takes deep dive into critical work-force challenges

The U.S. work force is at a turning point, with change swirling everywhere: Millennials are now the largest generation in the workplace. Baby boomers – and their decades of institutional knowledge – are nearing retirement after putting it off during last decade’s recession. Constant technological leaps are rewriting the rules for the skill sets that matter.

What does this mean for organizations trying to attract and hire today’s talent? How does this change the game for their ongoing efforts to build culture and develop their existing employees?

The Center for Operational Excellence is teaming up with three other centers for a pair of summer sessions focused on today’s greatest business challenges. The first, “Human Capital and Talent Management,” tackles these vital work-force development issues and on the morning of Tuesday, July 18, at the Fawcett Center.

At this session, gain insights on this issue from three compelling angles:

  • M. Gootman, Brookings Institution

    The Big Picture: Brookings Institution Fellow Marek Gootman will be unveiling results of a new work-force survey conducted in conjunction with the National Center for the Middle Market. The survey, set to be released in late June, looks at how middle-market companies – the fastest-growing segment of the economy – are responding to large-scale shifts in work-force dynamics to hire and retain workers.

  • The Ground War: Join talent management VPs Maura Stevenson (Wendy’s) and Kelly Wilson (Cardinal Health), and Kathy Smith, AVP Executive Succession and Development at Nationwide Insurance, for a moderated panel and audience Q&A session on how their organizations are responding to these work-force trends.
  • The Pipeline: Jamie Mathews-Mead, senior director of graduate career management at Fisher closes out the session with a look at how the college is preparing students to best meet companies’ rapidly evolving needs.

After the presentations, enjoy a networking lunch with members of other Fisher and Ohio State centers. Registration is set to open in June, with limited seating available for members and partners of each center.

The second summer session, set for Wednesday, Aug. 16, focuses on the explosion of data and digital disruption companies face and features a keynote from Jeremy Aston, senior director at communication tech giant Cisco. More details will be announced next month.

Check out all of COE’s upcoming events on our website …

Retail CEO headlining June women’s event

When apparel retailer J.Jill went public on the New York Stock Exchange in March, it was worth noting for a few reasons.

Paula Bennett

First, the Quincy, Mass.-based company’s IPO was the first such debut of 2017. Second, the company is led by CEO Paula Bennett. Female CEOs are rare atop the corporate ladder – and as for IPOs? They’re virtually nonexistent. Less than 3% of all IPOs in the past decade have been led by a female CEO.

Bennett is joining the Center for Operational Excellence at its next Women’s Leadership Forum on Friday, June 23, where employees of member companies are invited to network over breakfast and then hear her insights on how she’s enabled her team to deliver consistent profitable growth within a shifting retail landscape. Bennett also will share how the J. Jill team has turned obstacles into opportunities to create a strong and growing business with a loyal and growing customer base.

If you’re not familiar with J.Jill, the company has 275 stores in 43 states targeting affluent customers in the 40-65 age segment. The company has an omni-channel platform that spans its retail stores, website and catalogs.

J.Jill reported sales for its most recent fiscal year of $639 million, making it part of the fast-growing middle-market retail segment. The company was founded in 1959 – its name is a nod to the co-founders’ daughters – with its only sales channel through catalogs. The company jumped into e-commerce and opened its first retail stores in 1999. In recent years, J.Jill has seen robust top- and bottom-line growth as it has expanded, culminating in its spring IPO.

If you’re an employee of a COE member and are interested in attending the event, click here to read more or register now.

CoverMyMeds to share ‘stealth lean’ journey at June COE event

Columbus-based healthcare software maker CoverMyMeds made headlines earlier this year when McKesson Corp. announced a $1.1 billion deal to acquire the company, but it’s been a dynamic player in central Ohio’s tech startup scene for nearly a decade.

Fast-growing and routinely honored as one of the region’s best places to work, CoverMyMeds also has been working to ingrain a culture of continuous improvement into everything from its day-to-day software development to its big-picture strategy. But how does a structured approach to lean and agile thrive in a casual, jeans-day-every-day culture?

The Center for Operational Excellence is thrilled to host for its next IT Leadership Network forum on Tuesday, June 6, two leaders at CoverMyMeds at the forefront of its efforts to drive lean practices: Director of Quality and Risk Management Rick Neighbarger (pictured, right) and Agile Coach Nate Lusher. Neighbarger and Lusher in this wide-ranging discussion will offer insights on:

  • Operational excellence in a startup culture: Driving change in a consensus-building, not top-down, environment;
  • “Stealth lean:” Teaching the tools and behaviors without getting lost in the lingo;
  • Garnering buy-in: Selling change up and down the ladder; and
  • Moving forward in the face of change: Continuing a lean journey after the McKesson deal.

This session not only offers an inside look at the nationally recognized culture at CoverMyMeds but offers insights on leading and sustaining change that leaders can apply no matter the industry or company.

Click here to register for the morning event.

‘On Demand’ event Feb. 24 looks at supply chain impact of shifting consumer trends

prime now
Courtesy Amazon.com

With fourth-quarter and year-end financials for online retail juggernaut Amazon.com set to be released Feb. 2, industry watchers were abuzz with a statistic from digital commerce watcher Slice Intelligence: More than half of all 2016 growth in e-commerce came from Amazon alone.

This dominance is the latest sign that Amazon is growing as an industry disruptor, shaking brick and mortar retail to its core and reframing what it means to be competitive – and to win. Amazon’s most headline-grabbing move of late – Prime Now one-hour delivery – demonstrates that what’s propelling the company along is a relentless push to satisfy customer demand with lightning speed and unprecedented convenience.

Indeed, a shift toward instant-gratification customer demand is transforming the supply chain as we know it – and for a variety of industries. In the space of several years, Uber has turned the personal transportation trade on its ear and become a model of disruption, leading the Wall Street Journal in 2015 to state “There’s an Uber for Everything Now.” In the traditional world of goods production and fulfillment, consumer product giants such as Procter & Gamble Co. are undertaking vast strategic overhauls of their distribution models.

These changes roiling in the operations, logistics and supply chain management worlds pose huge challenges to companies just as they present opportunities. The Center for Operational Excellence has teamed up with the Fisher College of Business Operations and Logistics Management Association for a look at this trend through a half-day Supply Chain Symposium event called “On Demand,” set for Friday, Feb. 24, from noon to 3:30 p.m. At this event, attendees will have the opportunity to hear from leaders at companies including Nestle USA, DHL and Amazon about how they’re working to keep pace with demand and stay competitive.

adrian kumarThe first speaker at the event is Adrian Kumar (pictured, right), VP of Solutions Design, North America for DHL. Kumar leads a team of 50 engineers and supply chain professionals to drive growth and continuous improvement across the US and Canada. He’ll be discussing how changing consumer trends are changing the traditional fulfillment model along with the economics behind the model, crowd-sourced delivery. Kumar also will highlight the shift to regional and local fulfillment centers and the challenges in addressing short supply chain lead times.

michael coburnThe keynote speaker at the event is Michael Coburn (pictured, right), head of customer-facing supply chain for Nestle USA. Coburn, a nearly 30-year Nestle veteran, will introduce the concept of short-shelf-life products and their impact on products and customers. By presenting Nestle case studies, he’ll also illustrate their challenges and complexities along with the evolution of the short-lead-time supply chain space.

The event, open to COE members and Fisher graduate students, will wrap up with a discussion panel where Kumar of DHL will join Rob Precord, project manager, supplier-facing supply chain at Nestle and Matthew Fein, an operations manager at Amazon in Columbus.

Registration is open now for this event, which will take place on Fisher’s campus.

Upcoming supply chain event keynote wins major industry award

Don’t just take it from us that our featured keynote for next month’s Center for Operational Excellence supply chain event is a big deal.

chris caplice
Chris Caplice

The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals at its annual conference in Orlando this week awarded Dr. Chris Caplice the Distinguished Service Award, the most prestigious honor around for supply chain professionals. Caplice, the executive director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Transportation and Logistics, is the keynote at COE’s Oct. 21 supply chain forum. Registration is open now, though seating is restricted to employees of COE member companies.

Speaking of Caplice, CSCMP CEO Rick Blasgen said that Caplice “from his involvement in education, to his innovative work in identifying and developing technologies that have contributed to the improved efficiency and effectiveness of transportation, logistics, and supply chain processes … has had a dramatic impact in shaping the supply chain discipline as we know it.”

Caplice has contributed to our growing knowledge on supply chain management from the industry and academic side, placing himself in what CSCMP calls an elite group. In addition to his MIT role, he has worked at Logistics.com, Sabre Holdings, the Virginia Military Institute and the U.S. Army, where he served as an officer.

At COE’s event next month, Caplice is addressing a serious challenge for many organizations today, which lack supply chain designs that can suitably adapt to disruptions. He’ll be highlighting four oncoming trends – miniaturization, virtualization, decentralization and digitization – that will alter the competitive landscape as companies devise new ways to serve their customers. This session will provide supply chain managers and others with new insights as they rethink assumptions in their partner selection, distribution network design, and chosen service platforms.

Read more about the event here or register now.

‘Joy Inc.’ author, former summit keynote Sheridan returning in May

Miss last year’s Leading Through Excellence summit? Looking to revisit one of our most popular keynotes?

Rich Sheridan during his keynote at Leading Through Excellence 2015
Rich Sheridan during his keynote at Leading Through Excellence 2015

The Center for Operational Excellence is partnering with Fisher College of Business’ Master of Business Operational Excellence program to bring to campus Rich Sheridan, CEO of award-winning software developer Menlo Innovations LLC and author of Joy Inc. Employees of COE member companies are invited to join MBOE program alumni the morning of Friday, May 13, for a keynote by Sheridan, who kicked off the 2015 Leading Through Excellence summit and led a half-day workshop.

A programmer by trade, Sheridan entered the corporate world and found at the midpoint of his career that he no longer experienced the joy that had drawn him to the industry. After losing his job as a software development executive when the dot-com bubble burst, he founded Menlo Innovations in 2001, saying the company’s purpose was to “bring joy to the world through software.” Menlo has gone on to win the Alfred P. Sloan award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility for eight straight years and has earned five revenue awards from Inc. magazine.

In his keynote, based on Joy Inc., Sheridan will offer an inside look at the culture that’s flourished at Menlo over the last 15 years that leverages visual management, an open and collaborative workspace, and a “fail fast” ethos that has garnered attention nationwide. All attendees will receive a complimentary copy of Sheridan’s book, Joy Inc.

Click here to register for this limited-capacity event.

Upcoming women’s event explores communicating, connecting in digital age

The rapidly evolving digital world is changing how we communicate, how we process information, and even how we add and network with members in our organizations, raising many questions:

Is my LinkedIn profile opening or closing doors? Are my internal presentations truly selling my ideas for change? What can I look at online when hiring a candidate? How can I build a value-adding network with other women in my organization?

We’re tackling all these questions next Friday, June 26, with a dynamic trio of speakers bringing the latest best practices in digital communication and the development of corporate women’s networks. Featured at this members-only Women’s Leadership Forum are:

debra jasperDebra Jasper, founder, Mindset Digital (10 a.m.) – Jasper in this opening session will share her insights on the biggest shifts in digital communication, highlighting new ways to showcase expertise and determine what’s most essential to convey as attention spans shrink, whether managing up or down. She’ll chart the course for helping women leaders create powerful messages and connections inside their organizations and across the broader business community, offering vital advice on managing your “digital footprint.”

kailee gooldKailee Goold, attorney, Kegler Brown Hill + Ritter (11:15 a.m.) – Goold leverages her legal expertise to walk attendees through practical considerations that arise amid the rising use of social media in the workplace. That extends to using social media during hiring decisions, managing employees’ use of social media, and workplace liability issues.

mike kaufmannMike Kaufmann, CFO, Cardinal Health Inc. (1:30 p.m.) – Following a networking lunch, Kaufmann will take the stage to share his experiences as the executive sponsor of Cardinal’s women’s network group. Using the success of Cardinal’s network as a healthy and innovative one for employees, Kaufmann will offer up key advice for other companies, including engaging men – a unique approach that is gaining popularity in corporate America.

This event, open only to employees of COE member companies, has limited seating available. Click here to register.

March event explores intersection of supply chain risk, process excellence

“Bullet-proof” and lean: Is it possible?

In managing the business relationships that flow downstream to the customer, companies are honing their risk management practices to reduce vulnerability and bolster continuity. Battling risk, however, often leads to built-in redundancies and other measures that run counter to lean principles. How, then, can an organization with a legacy of lean, robust processes reduce its risk profile without turning back the clock on progress?

pat sample ge aviation
P. Sample

Join the Center for Operational Excellence next Thursday, March 12, in Pfahl Hall for an all-day forum, Running the Risk: The Future of Supply Chain Excellence, that features leaders from two global organizations. Kicking off the event is Patrick Sample (pictured, right), manager of SCD planning, supply chain – materials, at GE Aviation. Sample will be co-presenting with award-winning supply chain researcher and professor Tom Goldsby on their progress in balancing these two crucial priorities at the $22 billion-a-year company.

GE Aviation is the second-largest subsidiary of conglomerate General Electric, a $22 billion-a-year business that is one of the world’s leading makers of jet engines and related services. The company has operations on four continents around the world, which link to a massive supply chain network.

GE Aviation has proven progressive in tracing its supply chains all the way back to raw material extraction. In doing so, it uncovered a dependency on rare-earth minerals sourced almost entirely in China and has since sought to “engineer out” these materials in their engine components. The division also leads the way in the adoption of additive manufacturing techniques using 3-D printers for critical engine parts. By the year 2020, GE Aviation expects to produce more than 100,000 parts through these innovative manufacturing techniques. The company has taken these measures against the backdrop of their operational excellence heritage, rich in lean and six sigma practices.

Also featured is Elizabeth VanBodegraven, director of global procurement for the Logistics North America organization of chemical maker Momentive. VanBodegraven, drawing upon her two decades in procurement and supply chain roles, will be examining a crucial question companies face today: Whether the cost of risk management truly exceeds running the risk.

In addition to the dual keynotes, Running the Risk will feature a networking lunch; an interactive, group-based scenario that explores balancing risk management in operations; and a wrap-up panel discussion.

This members-only event, registration for which is available now, is a “must” for any individual or team interested in what place risk management has in the future of operational excellence.

Agenda

  • 8:30 a.m. – Registration opens
  • 9 a.m. – Presentation: Patrick Sample, GE Aviation; and Tom Goldsby, Fisher College of Business
  • 10:15 a.m. – Networking break
  • 10:30 a.m. – Presentation: Risk Management’s Cost: More Than Running the Risk?, Elizabeth VanBodegraven, Momentive
  • 11:45 a.m. – Lunch
  • 1 p.m. – Interactive, group-based risk management scenarios
  • 2:30 p.m. – Panel discussion
  • 3:30 p.m. – Event concludes

    Register an individual or group now

Webinar explores challenges, payoffs of electronic communications

Connecting far-flung employees – across an office or across the globe – is becoming an increasingly common challenge for companies of any size. A number of organizations have turned to technological solutions for town halls, top leadership updates and team meetings – but how can they ensure communication leads to results and isn’t lost along the way?

mills jamesThe Center for Operational Excellence is thrilled to partner with member Mills James to offer a hybrid case study / discussion panel webinar featuring leaders from two of the largest companies in Ohio who have successfully embedded technology into their communication efforts: Procter & Gamble and Cardinal Health.

Joining the webcast on Friday, Nov. 14, from noon to 1 p.m. EST from P&G is Kip Fanta, associate director of Employee Experience/Meetings and Collaboration, an employee of the Cincinnati-based consumer products giant for more than 20 years who has worked in a variety of roles. From Cardinal Health is Eileen Lehmann, who directs internal communications and oversees the application of technology to communications problems.

Fanta and Lehmann will be joined by Mills James VP Bruce Reid and COE Executive Director Peg Pennington.

This isn’t a webinar about what technology your organization should choose – it’s an exploration of how these can be used to drive employee engagement, align an organization with strategic goals and drive results in the short and long term. Participants will offer their insights on what worked, what didn’t, and how companies of any size can take action.

Click here to register for the webinar.