Last week, we hosted our industry and health-care MBOE cohorts on campus, bringing together dozens of professionals in a range of different fields. The principles and leadership skills we teach in each program carry many similarities, but there remain some key differences between health care and the rest of the pack. Shingo prize-winning author Jean Cunningham highlighted one of those when she visited our health-care cohort last week.

jean cunningham consulting lean accounting

Jean Cunningham (courtesy jeancunninghamconsulting.com)

Health care might be the only industry, Cunningham said, where you put a charge on a bill but only end up collecting a partial amount. That amount is based on the contracts and agreements organizations make with public and private insurance companies. Cunningham, author of the book Real Numbers, said traditional cost accounting systems are designed for all the resources to be used fully all the time. You create capability to create demand, and gather all resources such as people, materials and equipment and then produce what the customer needs. Taiichi Ohno, father of the Toyota Production System, once said that costs don’t exist to be calculated – they exist to be reduced. Lean accounting, Cunningham’s area of expertise, helps do exactly that by identifying and eliminating non-value add waste in the accounting process and helping managers understand the numbers to make meaningful decisions.

When organizations bring in lean, the first place they apply it is the “shop floor,” where patient care is actually provided. As the changes are being implemented, Cunningham said, it’s important to indicate them on financial statements. How do you do that? Well, the most important thing to do is to get the financial folks to plunge into operations and lean activities. Make them a part of the improvement teams so they can understand the changes that are being implemented and how they impact the financials. Lean accounting is about applying lean tools to streamline accounting and finance processes and also accounting for lean transformations.

Explaining lean accounting isn’t possible in the space of a single blog, but the key takeaway here is knowing that people outside of accounting need fewer, and easier-to-understand transactions. When they make transformations the key is to provide information that takes the right calculations into accounting and reflect gains and losses.

Interested to hear more about lean accounting from Cunningham? Click here



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