The MBOE program trains our students to be leading problem-solvers in their organization by providing the tools they need and, more importantly, teaching the behavior that creates lasting change. This week, we started handing out the tools.

Peg Pennington, a senior lecturer and Executive Director of the Center for Operational Excellence, kicked off MBOE’s second day of week one by walking students through the DMAIC methodology. This gets them ready for their journey toward green and black belts in the program, which uses the online Moresteam University modules. DMAIC (check out the breakdown in the image) helps students define, measure, analyze, improve and control the change they are working on in implementing at their organization. The modules will also help them prepare for the Six Sigma exam.

Another important tool is the A3 problem-solving method, which Executive-in-Residence Gary Butler introduced. Most of us are used to seeing a 100-slide PowerPoint describing a problem and all the steps that were taken to address it. With the A3 method, it’s all on an 11×17 sheet, and not just by writing in fine print but by being very specific about the problem.  It’s not only a good problem-solving tool but a great communication tool. An attention span, after all, does much better with one slide than 100!

We also wasted no time getting students to their first gemba. The assignment: Visit various areas in Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State and Riverside Methodist Hospital, speak with people there and develop a problem statement. The goal was to help students understand that what you hear from people the first time are mostly symptoms. Observing the process and getting data to support the problem really help in the end. On a short visit with no data, a situation you might find yourself in at some point like our students, it’s important to keep these things in mind:

  • Keep an open mind. What you think is a problem may not be the problem.
  • Don’t walk in with a solution. When you have a solution in mind, you tend to listen less and lose out on the information you could potentially receive from people/frontline staff.
  • Listen. Make a note of issues/symptoms. They might not be directly related to the problem, but you might find good ideas to help people understand what’s in it for them when you come back to implement countermeasures and gain their buy-in.


Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Add Your Thoughts


2 + = 3