This edition of Think OpEx features a guest blogger: Tom Paider, an AVP and build capacity leader at COE member Nationwide Insurance. Paider, also a graduate of Fisher’s MBOE program, will give an inside look at the lean transformation that took place in Nationwide’s IT division.

You’ve probably heard talk about the need for management to change when undergoing a lean transformation. The principle is simple: How can we expect our staff to change if we as managers don’t change as well? While the principle is simple, the implementation of the principle isn’t so simple. Many managers believe they’re where they are because they know best how to direct their subordinates They believe their role is to assign tasks, monitor progress and assess performance.

Culture, Values and attitudes, What we do

Focus on what behaviors you want people to exhibit, then design processes around those behaviors. It’s much easier for people to act their way into thinking than think their way into acting.

How, then, do we transform these managers to a lean mindset focused on coaching, problem-solving and empowerment?

In my experience at Nationwide, this management transformation follows the same general pattern as staff in lean transformations: Changes to daily behavior used to change thinking over time. It follows the pattern outlined in John Shook’s MIT Sloan article “How to Change a Culture: Lessons from NUMMI”. Shook surmises it’s much more difficult for an organization to think its way into acting than to act its way into thinking. By approaching transformation from a daily behavior standpoint, the change is baked directly into the DNA of the organization and backslides are much less likely.

When we first deployed a lean framework to Nationwide’s Application Development Center, our managers were supporters but ultimately didn’t change the way they worked. This caused confusion within our teams as staff moved toward collaboration, empowerment and problem-solving while the management team still operated in a command-and-control hierarchical style. A management team that didn’t understand how to channel the enthusiasm of the staff quickly snuffed out the initiative of our associates.

So how did we do it? We put in place processes that reinforced the behaviors desired: A focus on coaching staff instead of directing them, building problem-solving muscle throughout the organization, and getting them out of their offices and to the gemba.  We focused on daily accountability through tiered standups, visual controls and visual workflow for the work of management, and leader standard work that governed the expected behaviors.

In a subsequent blog post, learn what each of these looked like and how we implemented them. Stay tuned…



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