Barb Bouche, an MBOE coach and director of process improvement at Seattle Children’s Hospital, told students at this week’s session that she began exploring the option of applying Toyota Production principles to the hospital a few years ago. She met with resistance from the organization, the argument being, “Patients are not cars.” Shortly afterwards she happened to cross paths with some people from Boeing. They told her during their lean journey the argument they commonly heard was, “Airplanes are not cars!”

MBOE students strategizing production game plan

MBOE students strategizing production game plan

It didn’t take Barb long to realize that argument arose from a resistance to change. In last decade Seattle Children’s has completely changed how it do esbusiness by applying lean principles. Officials have significantly reduced the inventory of supplies by working closely with their suppliers and developed a world class process for materials management.

Speaking of airplanes, the MBOE students spent their second day on campus manufacturing StrikeFighters using Legos.  After struggling through the first and second round of the chaotic batching process they finally were able to create flow using the lean principles of takt time, work cell, one piece flow, level loading, kanban and simplification. My co-author, Matt Burns, wrote about this same simulation in an earlier post.

A student commented, “I think I am just beginning to see what lean is all about!” Another said, “I did not know what I was doing in the first round. The last round made it very clear after all the chaos was gone and there was finally some coordination and flow among my team members.”

In the evening, Capt. Michael H. Glazer, commanding officer and professor of naval science at OSU’s Naval ROTC  gave a captivating overview of flight deck operations and aircraft carrier facts. With multiple safety programs, Glazer said, the naval aviation mishaps decreased from 776 aircrafts in 1954 to 39 in 1996. Keep in mind naval aviator trainees are landing the aircraft on a short run of only 330 feet.

Another long day for the students!



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