Posts Tagged 'The Media Fast Challenge'

One Challenge Done, Now on to the Next

The Monastic Challenge is officially over. I made it 28 days with no meat, dairy products, alcohol, caffeine or sugar. I’ve lost around twenty pounds and I’m the lightest I’ve been since high school. Food tastes better than ever, my sleep is amazing, and my energy levels are great. I’ll likely keep a lot of these good habits for a while, I’m really glad my crazy friends put me up to this. Special kudos to Kris Sharma, who came up with The Monastic Challenge and our challenge for March.

For the month of March, we are going to have a different type of fast, one from media. Think of your day-to-day activities, just a constant parade of emails, phone calls, text messages, web sites, television, movies and video games. Most of us spend ninety percent of our time looking at illuminated rectangles.

Does any of this stuff actually improve the quality of our lives? Or does it just let us ignore the lacking parts of life? What would happen if we unplugged from the Matrix for a month? Well, we’re going to find out.

The Media Fast Challenge:
No television
No movies or DVDs
No texting – if someone texts you with a question, you need to call back with your answer. And you should let that person know you’re not texting that much.
No video games or silly games on your phone
Email is permitted TWICE A DAY maximum
No newspapers, magazines, news sites, blogs, Youtube, Hulu, etc. In fact, no web surfing all unless it’s to achieve a work-related task you’re doing THAT DAY. This means if you’re booking a trip to Vegas, you better have your credit card in your hand. And even with work related stuff, you should be limited to ONE HOUR MAXIMUM on the web.

This should work for everyone. If there are specific bullet points that are problematic, adjust it as needed. But keep asking yourself, “Is this really necessary?”

Mike ^_^

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” – Leo Tolstoy



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