Posts Tagged 'intimate'

Legacies Left Must Be Alright

Ever notice yourself having a train of thought due to a recurring theme manifesting itself in your life events?  No?  Well then maybe you should pay closer attention.

Last we spoke, I just arrived in Peru and promised to provide you an update with pictures.  I’m not one to disappoint . . . I just didn’t realize there would be such an enormous lapse between posts.  Well, as they say: “Time flies when you’re having fun.”  Personally, I prefer: “Life happens when you’re making other plans.”

Here’s what’s new with me:  My aunt died.  I visited Peru.  Spring sprung.  Spring quarter started.  Peruvian bacteria accompanied me home.  My internship search continues.  New officers are being elected in student organizations.  Red Carpet weekend just ended.

My array of feelings (in no accompanying order to the prior list): sick, tired, sick and tired, over-committed, under-utilized, over-whelmed, under-appreciated, appreciative, apprehensive, excited, hopeful, ambitious, grateful, irritated, exhausted, elated, deflated, determined, distracted, supportive, suspicious, apathetic, empathetic, blessed, lucky, and loved.

Bi-polar?  Nah, it’s just my Fisher Grad life.  Ups and downs are normal and they come quickly and sometimes unexpectedly.  There’s a lot going on and it is really important to navigate through everything without failing to make time for the people and things that *really* matter.  Which brings me back to contemplating “legacy”.

Just as a snail leaves a trail, we are each bound to leave a legacy.  I’m amazed at the legacies left by people and by institutions.  The Ohio State University has a lot of alumni.  I was told this during my Red Carpet weekend event last year.  David Smith of our Admissions Office travels throughout the world recruiting MBA students and he told us that no matter where we were, we could let out a cry of “O-H!” and undoubtedly it would be met with an response of “I-O!”  These are the stories of legend.  Stories of legend are worth testing when possible so while hiking around Machu Picchu, our group opted to conduct a test.  Standing at the Intiwatana overlooking the Central Plaza, we let out a loud cry of “O-H!” and to our great amusement we were promptly answered by “I-O!”  Yes, seriously.  We were so amused we continued our cry time and again until we were shushed by some nearby Peruvian park attendants.  In our exuberance, we forgot about the fact that we were at one of the modern wonders of the world and not all guests would enjoy listening to us yell while they navigated this sacred space.

Fact is: I’m proud to be a Buckeye.  Over the past couple of days I’ve met many potential members of the Ohio State MBA Class of 2013.  Some of them have accepted their admission letter and will be joining me this fall.  Others sit the fence and are still considering their options.  My advice to them is the same I’d give to any of you reading this that are unsure of your MBA future: Choose the program that your heart tells you to attend.  Each program has its merit and will provide great opportunities for your future.  You’ll do fine wherever you choose to go.  That said, make sure you’re following your own inner voice and not that of your parents, fiance(e), boyfriend/girlfriend, boss, co-workers, or friends.  You spend a *HUGE* amount of time on campus and with your classmates.  Be sure you’re spending that precious time at the place that suits you best.  Life is short and the days/weeks fly by quickly.  I can hardly believe I’m seven weeks away from the end of my first year.  Leave your own legacy… not one that someone else dreamt up for you.

Fisher has a very intimate and collaborative program but – believe you me – B-school pushes you to compete against each other.  Frankly, I’m getting really tired of competing.  As long as I’m doing the best I can do, I’m fine.  In the end, what matters is not the things that we accomplish or leave undone.  It is not the offices held or the grades, salaries, or frequent flier miles earned but the people we love and whose lives we touch that matter.

I’m trying to tell you something about my life
Maybe give me insight between black and white
The best thing you’ve ever done for me
Is to help me take my life less seriously, it’s only life after all”  – The Indigo Girls

This is what giddy looks like.

Found him!

Downtown Lima at dusk

O-H-I-O (photo courtesy of Jeff Sleasman, taken by Leanne Gluck)


Schadenfreude

One of the reasons I think vampire series are so popular lately is because we see so much of our humanity visually depicted in imaginary characters, including witches and werewolves.  Whether you’re Team Edward or Team Jacob . . . or rather, like me, are clueless about Twilight yet find yourself obsessed with the brothers Salvatore (my guilty pleasure = The Vampire Diaries), there’s something about the struggle between good and evil that each of us can identify with.

My belief: B-school has a way of bringing out the best and the worst in all of us.  Some folks use a lot of smoke & mirrors.  You know the type: they put on the charade that they’ve got everything together and that all things work in their favor.  Yeah?  Bologna.  No one leads such a charmed life.  We each bear burdens.  Anyone that tells you different is either a crazy person or a liar.  As humans, none of us are perfect and that’s perfectly OK.  Remember: without contrast, those low times in life, we’d never be able to appreciate our highs or know when something is really good.

Fisher is an intimate community.  Sometimes I find it really hard to happily coexist with the “together” people day after day, week after week. Q: Why is it that I long for the moment I see a chink in their armor?  A: Why are reality shows so popular?  Why, as a society, do we love to see others screw up?  I think it’s because we seek things that are similar to ourselves.  It makes us feel better to know we’re not the only ones that struggle . . . and that struggling is normal.  Is that bringing out the best is us?  Probably not.

As I ponder all these questions of “why”, it dawns on me that even Superman and Batman had to contend with having a good side and a dark side.  If they couldn’t escape it, what chance do I have?  I’m certainly no Jedi knight.

The epic battle of my “good” self vs my “evil” self rages on during this season of job hunting . . . and here I stand without a cape.

“Every one is a moon, and has a dark side which he never shows to anybody.”  – Mark Twain


Under the Weather

Actually, if you talk to a number of people in the program, you’d hear the opposite: they’re “so over the weather”.  Yes, friends, we’ve just started to get some more snow over the past two days.  Heh.  In the melodic words of Bachman-Turner Overdrive: “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet”.

As for me, since starting on our student health insurance plan, I have encountered three occasions that required prescription meds.  The most recent occurred this week.  The quarter started on Monday and by Tuesday afternoon in Cost Accounting, I could tell my cold was developing into something more.  I hoped for the best (2pm) and opted to see how things developed.  By 8pm that night, I was miserable and opted to inform my roommate of that fact every couple of minutes.  He knew I was sick but had no idea to what extent . . . until I grabbed a flashlight and had him glance at the back of my throat.  Sparing you the details, I’ll leave it at: it was quite a mess.

Here’s the thing: as students, we have health coverage for doctors appointments and unanticipated illness.  We can make appointments to be seen at the Wilce Health Center… which is fine and dandy as long as you don’t need to be seen outside of the hours of 8am-5pm M-F or 8am-noon on Saturdays (unless there’s a football game and then you’re out of luck).  Appointments are meant to be scheduled in advance.  Unfortunately, many of us can’t pre-plan when we’re going to really need to see a doctor.  Considering that, you can call in the morning and try to get seen the same day.  I had to do that in October and it happened to work out extremely well.  That time, I called at 7:30am and got a lab appt followed by a doctor’s appointment within about an hour.  The process there went like clockwork: all ran on time and I was in and out within about an hour.  There’s a pharmacy on site and I was good to go.  That was October . . .

. . . flash back to the nastiness of my throat infection on a Tuesday night ….

After seeing the mess my throat became, my roommate was a bit freaked out and worried (it really was nasty) and believed I should seek more immediate medical attention rather than wait until 7:30am and try to score an appointment at the health center.  By this time (10pm), the alternative treatment options listed on the website had all closed for the day… all except for one: the OSU Medical Center Emergency Room.

Desperate times call for desperate measures . . . but I really did not want to be one of “those people” tying up emergency resources for something non-critical (it’s not like I had a severed arm).  I was really on the fence: my situation was becoming increasingly dire and I didn’t want to be up a proverbial creek the next morning unable to attend class AND unable to get an appointment.  For reassurance, I called the phone number listed and spoke with a delightful woman named Nicole.  She said they’ve treated people with less serious issues; if I wanted to come in to see a doctor I should.  Given that, I opted to give it a go and head over there . . . knowing the wait would likely be a long one.  I wasn’t mistaken.  My roommate, aspiring for sainthood, chose to accompany me.  By 3am we were at a 24-hr CVS picking up my prescriptions.  We woke up at 7am to make it to classes (8:30am start).

The first time I needed to see a doctor was a few days after our insurance began but a couple of weeks before school was actually in session.  I did not have my student insurance card yet and was unsure of how everything worked.  Luckily, there is a lot of pertinent information listed on the OSU web and I was able to reach the website of the administrator of our student insurance plan.  On their site, I registered and gained immediate access to a version of my insurance card.  With a printout in hand, I visited a local urgent care center (the Wilce Health Center wasn’t open; it was a weekend during break) and was taken care of rather promptly.  The only dismay came when getting my prescription filled: if you don’t do it at the pharmacy on campus, the cost is out of pocket.  Luckily, I was still on my previous employer’s insurance and could use their prescription coverage to make ends meet.

So, to quickly summarize: OSU has outstanding facilities and services available to students.  With pre-planning, all works like clockwork.  Unexpected illness can be dealt with rather timely although a small wait could be involved.  Our medical staff and support personnel are professional, courteous, and very patient-oriented.  They are truly a first-class operation at the OSU Medical Center as well as the Wilce Health Center.  I am very happy with the treatment I’ve received and I’m confident you will be too.  To me, it is just one more reason to illustrate the power of a large research university backing an intimate and individual MBA program like Fisher.  You get the best of both worlds.



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