Posts Tagged 'Columbus Ohio'

“I wanna go back to Ohio State, to old Columbus town”

It is such an exciting time here at Ohio State! Everyone has started moving in, and you can almost feel the anticipation of a year full of opportunities. As a combined BSBA/MAcc student, I am returning to OSU for my fourth year but am doing the graduate program. As implied in the song I quoted in my title, it is always exciting to come back (or come for the first time) to Ohio State! For those of you who have never been here, don’t get the wrong idea: Columbus is not an “old town;” it is in fact a modern city!

MAcc orientation was so fun! We learned more about the program and learned a lot about and from each other.  The diversity in our class is phenomenal! We have students from 20 states and 8 countries, and everyone has a wide range of experiences and interests.  As I meet other students, I enjoy their stories and senses of humor. At some points, my cheeks almost hurt from smiling and laughing so much. That’s not exactly what I was expecting for the start of a graduate accounting program!

Our team building activities were entertaining, but they also brought us out of our comfort zones. The high ropes course required us to trust and encourage each other, and we also gained confidence in ourselves and our teamwork abilities. The lessons we learned about ourselves and each other will help as we begin classes, form project teams and study groups, and become friends outside the classroom. (You can see some photos from orientation posted here.)

Orientation included a tour of Ohio Stadium (affectionately called The Shoe, since it was first shaped like a horseshoe). This picture shows part of the home of Buckeye football and also two of the buildings in the Fisher complex, home of the College of Business.

I’m excited to be back and look forward to sharing my experiences with you!


The Key to Graduate Housing

We are almost finished with spring quarter and I am shocked by how rapidly my first year ended.  With its end, so arrives the end of my apartment lease.  My roommate and I have decided to move.  We get along well, enjoy living together (will for another year), and desire a nicer apartment.  After hunting for a few days, we found our new abode, signed our new lease, and will move at the beginning of July.

The Class of 2011 will soon receive their MBAs and many will depart from Columbus, starting new lives beyond b-school and vacating many apartments.  The new 2013 class of full-time MBAs is slowly but surely gathering on Facebook and has already entered into a variety of discussions.  As I watch passively, I am reminded how clueless they are . . . which is totally normal.  To help them out (as well as any of you considering a full-time program), here’s a quick checklist along with several resources to get you started “apartment hunting”.

1. PROXIMITY: “Location.  Location.  Location!”  To live a happy grad school life, do not underestimate this critical decision.  Be as close to campus as possible – but not so close that you’re surrounded by undergrads.  The closer you live to campus, the easier it is to stop home and grab a bite to eat, change clothes, or take a nap.

Specific to Columbus: This is not Cleveland although it also snows here from November through April.  A “normal” commute from one place to the next is 15-20 minutes; a 30 minute drive is a long commute.

Specific to Fisher: It is easy to find housing within three miles of campus so your door-to-door travel time is approx 15 minutes.  Arriving late to class is a BAD idea.  If you are not a morning person, find a place near Fisher.  If you do not have a car, find a place near High Street or one of the main campus bus routes.

2. COST: Keep things reasonable especially if you will assume student loan debt to pay for b-school.  If you live like you’re rich now, you’ll have to live like you’re poor later.  Want a nicer place?  Get a roommate.

Specific to Columbus: If you live alone, plan to spend around $600/month for a decent place to live.  Any lower than that means you are sacrificing something (i.e. location, amenities, safety, privacy, peace & quiet).  Make sure you know what you are sacrificing.  With a roommate or a shared living arrangement (like a boarding house), you can find reasonable living accommodations for $350/person/month.

Specific to Fisher: If you’re not receiving housing assistance . . . or if you’re not independently wealthy, you’re smart to find a roommate to split expenses.  Use Facebook, the Graduate Housing Google Group, or OSU’s Off-Campus Student Services Roommate Search.

3. COMMUNITY: Do your research and ensure the type of community you live in matches your lifestyle.  You may want a family-friendly community with a yard, an urban landscape, a quiet community, or a communal area crawling with students.  The better the match the happier you will be.

Specific to Columbus: There are areas that cater to each lifestyle choice.  Some research online will help you determine what’s best for you.  One good site to use is www.metro-rentals.com.  They explain the various communities here and provide a link to the suburbs in case that may interest you.

Specific to Fisher: You will be busy . . . so, unless you like to study at the Library (which incidentally is very nice), figure you will need an atmosphere at home that allows you to study.  Choose wisely and don’t get hung up on a bunch of amenities; there’s no need to pay for a bunch of extras you won’t use.  The RPAC and ARC blow away any apartments’ workout facilities.

HOUSING RESOURCES for Fisher MBAs:

Fisher Commons is an option available to Fisher MBAs and is great for camaraderie . . . which means you’ll sacrifice a bit on privacy.  Football tailgates are a norm in season and pre-event festivities are common in the courtyard.  Residents are primarily MBAs but not exclusively, other grad students (law, med, etc) call it home too.  Rent is relatively expensive without housing assistance but moving and commuting are made easy.

OSU Off-Campus Housing Services provides rental information, lease assistance, roommate contracts, roommate search support, and other helpful information to consider when moving to the OSU campus area.

www.metro-rentals.com is a website that lists various independent rentals available in various areas of town.  It includes a description of communities around the city as well as a link to suburban rentals.

www.padmapper.com is a handy website that scans Craig’s List and other apartment posting sites and displays the results visually on a map.  You can filter the results and easily stay informed of new rental opportunities as they become available.  It’s also offered as an app for your smart phone.

www.apartmentratings.com is another handy website to peruse before renting in a local apartment community.  Sometimes you don’t always get what you pay for – this site helps advise you.  It’s important to realize the audience is self-selected.  The massively disgruntled will find the time to post commentary.  Some fans post reviews as well . . . it’s up to you to filter through the info available and make an informed decision.

My final advice: the shaded areas on this map will be filled with undergrads because they are in walking distance of campus.  As a b-school student, I encourage you to explore the Outside University District areas.

Good luck and see you in the fall!

University Area Map


Beyond the Ball

Breaking: OSU sports are not the only events in Columbus, OH

This post is specifically geared to the non-sports-fan audience.  So, if you ceremoniously watch ESPN’s SportsCenter, you may want to stop reading this now.  Furthermore, if your idyllic weekend involves countless hours of watching sports with a beer in hand, please stop here . . . the remaining content won’t likely appeal to you.

One thing that might be factoring into your b-school decision is where you’ll be living for the next two years.  Knowing that, I’ll try to give you a brief synopsis of Columbus and the options available to you from an food & culture standpoint.

ART & CULTURE Frankly, sports have never interested me from any aspect other than a social outing.  My favorite places to visit are art museums and galleries.  I could spend countless hours visiting them (but not every weekend).  There is a rather strong arts community in Columbus which I believe is fostered by the amount of colleges & universities within the city.  On campus, we have the Wexner Center for the Arts.  Just down High Street is The Short North district which houses multiple galleries, restaurants, and shops.  Further down the road, downtown, you’ll find the Columbus Art Museum, the Riffe Gallery, and CCAD’s Canzani Center Gallery.  Also downtown, my favorite space is Hawk Galleries… if glass is your passion, you’ll be in heaven.  Additionally, you can find more spaces in surrounding areas: German Village, Bexley, Grandview Heights, Dublin, and Delaware.  Admire from a distance or try your hand at creation… there’s a long list available.  I can’t possibly include them all here.

Beyond art, there are many other places to see and visit in Columbus.  For illustrative purposes, here’s a few: the Topiary Park, The Franklin Park Conservatory, The Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, COSI, the Santa Maria, The Ohio Historical Center, The Ohio Statehouse, and the Ohio Expo Center on the Ohio State Fairgrounds.  Columbus is truly a great place for singles, couples, and families.  Art Festivals, Oktoberfest, the State Fair, Home & Garden Show, ComFest, and just about every cultural festival imaginable are all apart of this city’s calendar of events.  Want to enjoy the outdoors?  We have the Metroparks and additional options within a couple hours driving distance (Hocking Hills, Lake Erie, etc.).

FOODIES Also worth mentioning is the food culture in Columbus.  Home of White Castle, Donato’s, Wendy’s, Max & Erma’s, and Bob Evan’s, Columbus could be viewed as nothing more than fast food and strip malls.  Yes – Columbus has fast food and vast amounts of shopping which many people enjoy.  (Note: something for everyone.)  If you are familiar with terms like edamame, sous vide, tapenade, and aoli, read on.  Columbus’ destinations for foodies are gaining national recognition lately.  Recent articles have been published in The Washington Post and Columbus was featured on Anthony Bourdain’s “No Reservations” when Anthony and Michael Ruhlman visited a few bright culinary spots in the city.  We also have our share of Farmer’s Markets that offer fresh fare late-Spring through Fall.

So, if you’re an international student (like my roommate Edouard) and not attached to American football, have no fear.  We are a diverse city that has many international influences (thanks to the amount of professionals entering and exiting the city working in government, higher education, retail, insurance, and banking).  Without a doubt, Columbus has something for everyone.  Rest assured – you will enjoy living here and, if you ever find yourself with some extra time on your hands (which is rare), there’s plenty to do right outside your door.

Want more?  Also visit Insider Ohio for additional information on the area.


Andyman

Local radio DJ Andyman of CD101 died over the weekend. For those of you who grew up in Columbus, you have probably listened to him on the radio.

My first introduction to CD101 was in the fall of 1994. I was a freshman in high school and Ben, the senior that drove me to school, listened to CD101. I grew up in Dublin and went to high school at St. Charles so we listened to the radio for about 30 – 40 minutes every morning. It was on these drives that I was introduced to bands like The Clash, The Smiths, The Ramones, The Replacements, Wilco, etc. and also heard new music from my favorite bands like Pearl Jam, Smashing Pumpkins and Foo Fighters.

Although I don’t listen to CD101 as much as I used to, it still holds the #1 preset spot on my car radio and is what I turn to first when I want to listen to music.

CD101 doesn’t play great music every time (a recent example is Owl City’s “Fireflies”) but they do play good music the large majority of the time and for that we owe CD101 and Andyman a huge debt of gratitude.



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