Adjusting to Grad School Life

Like many of my classmates, I started the MAcc program right out of undergrad. For that reason, I was very curious as to how differently grad school would feel. I wasn’t sure how my normal everyday habits would translate at the graduate school level. If you’re not coming right from undergrad, I’m sure you’re asking yourself a similar question!

After the first few weeks, I can tell you that adjusting to the MAcc and life in Columbus has been a breeze! Here are five of my favorite things about the MAcc program and being in grad school here at Ohio State:

The classroom environment

There is such a high level of respect between the professors and students at the graduate level. Our classrooms are more discussion-based and less homework-heavy. The distinguishing factor for me is that the professors care about us fully understanding the material. After all, we are here to deepen our knowledge of accounting—not just get A’s.

The time commitment  

In our classes, the deliverables consist mostly of group projects. In undergrad, I remember meeting with groups as late as 11 p.m. to work on projects. In the MAcc program, I love that we all have very similar class schedules and meet while still on campus during the day. The culture is this way because many students live off-campus. I appreciate this aspect of the MAcc program because I can leave time for other priorities in the evenings!

The subject exposure

One unique component of the MAcc program is the exposure to over 18 courses in only one year! Each course is seven weeks long (aside from a few electives), and the best part is that only four courses are required. That leaves at least 14 courses that you can tailor to your preference to make your MAcc experience truly personalized!

Are seven-week courses stressful? That was a question I asked myself before beginning the program. They are completely manageable! In fact, I love them because I can easily visualize my schedule over the seven-week period and balance school, work, and life!

Living in a metropolitan city

audrey-farmers-marketColumbus offers so much more than what lies on campus. As a grad-student, I love that there are very accessible places to go off campus. Downtown is a quick drive away and so are the Blue Jackets (hockey) and Columbus Crew (soccer) teams. Even closer to campus is Short North - a neighborhood just a few blocks from my apartment that offers dozens of trendy food, drink, fitness, and shopping options! That leads me to my fifth point…

Fitness

Leading a healthy and balanced lifestyle has always been a priority for me. Finding a new workout routine on a new campus was something I was worried about. Luckily, the Fisher College of Business is close to two campus recreation facilities (the RPAC and North Recreation Center) that offer group fitness classes as well as great amenities to students for free!

Another bonus: This semester, the MAcc program created both sand volleyball and soccer co-ed intramural teams. Intramurals are a great way to stay active and get to know students in the MAcc program! Off campus, there are also various options. Most apartment complexes have workout facilities, and I love the group fitness/yoga studios in Short North as well as the surrounding suburbs!

Trip to Seattle for Microsoft Interview

In early September, I flew out to Redmond, Washington for a final round interview with Microsoft for a finance position.  Even though I am in the Master of Accounting Program, I decided to explore other career paths besides public accounting when deciding where I wanted to apply.

When I first stepped foot on the Microsoft campus, I was instantly reminded of Ohio State.  The campus is very green and large yet easy to navigate.  People were outside running and enjoying their time on the basketball, soccer, and volleyball courts that are scattered throughout the Microsoft campus.  Microsoft also has a bus service that takes employees around campus, similar to Ohio State’s CABS system.   I enjoyed being able to see technology of the past, present, and future at Microsoft’s Visitor Center.

Microsoft’s Campus in Redmond, Washington

After walking around campus to get the nerves out, I went into my “Super Day” where I had lunch, four interviews, and dinner with Microsoft finance professionals.  I had an awesome experience talking with employees from the company and decided to accept a full time position with them the following week.

No visit to Seattle would have been complete without visiting the Space

My view from the Space Needle in Seattle

Needle! I was stunned by the amazing views from the top deck of the 605 foot tower. There is also a deck a level below that has a rotating see-through glass floor. Having never been to the Pacific Northwest, I was amazed at how beautiful the natural environment was.

Signing my name on my offer of employment was a huge stress reliever.  After having interviewed with dozens of companies throughout my college career, my best advice to someone in the job hunt is to just be yourself!  By landing an interview, you have already demonstrated to employers that you have the background of someone who is a potential fit for their company.  Now, it is time to make sure you are a cultural fit for them and they are a cultural fit for you! Most people do not realize that interviews are meant to find a mutual fit.  It is important to do your research and have a strong list of questions prepared to learn more about employees at the company you are evaluating.

A fun fact about the MAcc program is that all students receive a career consultant to work with as we are searching for jobs. I utilized mine to help with evaluating and negotiating my various offers.  There are so many different career paths that you can take after the MAcc and I am glad Ohio State provides us with the resources to figure out which path is best for us.

Taiwanese Girl in Columbus

MY FIRST BLOG POST! How exciting!

Hello dear readers, this is Zola speaking.  At the start of my life as a Fisher grad blogger, I would like to introduce myself:

Where do I come from?

There you are- Taiwan!

Taiwan.  A tiny island across the whole Pacific Ocean. On this map, you can get a rough idea of its size and distance. (It took me about 32 hours flying and waiting at airports to get to Columbus!)

Before coming to OSU, I graduated from National Taiwan University with bachelor’s degrees in Finance/Accounting and my one-year internship at KPMG Advisory in June.

Why am I here?

My list of applications for graduate programs abroad was not super long: Three schools. That’s it. And oh you bet The Ohio State University was on the top of it. Not only was I deeply impressed by the “Buckeye Proud” during my school research, the super friendly and helpful Assistant Director of Specialized Graduate Recruiting & Admissions Rebecca Zurek also made me fall in love with the school and the SMF program itself. With enormous help from Rebecca and the Director of Specialized Graduate Recruiting & Admissions Rob Chabot, I was fortunate enough to receive the University Fellowship, which has made my OSU experience even better.

The Oval

How’s it going so far?

Me and Harley-a family member in my homestay

Right after my flight landed in Columbus, I lived with a temporary homestay arranged by International Friendships, Inc (IFI). The host, Janet, and her family welcomed me with open arms, allowing me to adapt to my new life in the U.S. with absolute ease. I really couldn’t appreciate their kindness more. I strongly recommend applying for a short-term homestay through IFI to any international student who wishes to make local friends and experience American culture before school starts!

Now, I have been through the preterm courses in August led by the SMF program director Professor George Pinteris, which is basically Finance 101 for the SMF program and I personally consider a solid start of the program.

Sneak peek of my next episode

Mirror Lake before sunrise

Just one month into the new semester, I’ve already started to know my way around the SMF program, the OSU campus and Columbus itself. I will be sharing something fun about my classes, my dorm, my food and… just MY LIFE in general. Hope that’s spicy enough.:) Don’t change the channel!

Interning in Chicago – The Blue Experience

This past summer I had the opportunity to intern with Health Care Services Corporation also known as the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of IL, MT, NM, OK, and Texas (Quite the mouthful). I was a member of the internal audit team, assessing our internal business practices and identifying ways to more efficiently deliver care to the patients insured by Blue Cross. It was a fun summer, to say the least.

My journey to Blue Cross started nearly a year ago. Last fall, I met a director of audit at the National Black MBA Conference held in Philadelphia. A quick sidenote: The National Black MBA Conference is a must for students and the OSU Office of Diversity and Inclusion typically sponsors a group of students every fall. Another compelling factor is that these conferences put you in a great position to both network and meet global companies.

Once the summer came around, I was ready to dive into the internship. One of the great things about Blue Cross is their structured intern program. Between the Illinois and Texas offices, there were 150 interns (including 15 graduate interns). One of the best events was “Lattes with Leaders,” a weekly event where interns would grab coffee with a member of executive leadership. Some of our guest speakers included the Chief Financial Officer, the Chief Medical Officer, and the President of the Illinois Blue Cross Plan. I took notes in every meeting and reflected on ways to grow as a leader.

Another compelling attribute of the internship is the annual Intern Innovation Challenge. For the competition, I was paired with four other interns and had to devise an innovative solution addressing the mental health challenges faced by high school and college-aged students. Our group created Bearable, a chatbot driven referral network that will provide students with rapid access to a clinical provider. We had an incredible team who worked hard to on the project. Without a doubt, the hard work showed because we won 1st place!!

It was a memorable summer and I will never forget the wonderful team that I met. I can’t thank Blue Cross Blue Shield, the National Black MBA Association, and Ohio State enough for their roles in making it happen.

Finding Balance in the MBLE Program

It is hard to imagine that six weeks has passed since our first semester began. But like the saying goes, “time flies when you’re having fun”, which actually started before our first class.

Upon completion of orientation, our class went to Summit Vision, an outdoor team-building experience. Because none of us knew each other before the program, this was a challenge as we struggled to complete objectives as essentially a group of strangers. However, when we finished a couple of hours later, Summit Vision’s impact was obvious; we surely developed some lasting friendships, ready to tackle the upcoming semester.

Hiding from the rain and waiting for our bus to pick us up

This carried over to our next gathering, which involved the second-year students of the MBLE program. We all went to COSI, where we had a catered, private room and a COSI team member who showed us exciting experiments. Because many of our class members are from outside of Columbus, this was their first experience of Downtown. We made sure to do some exploring and not let our short time together go to waste.

Selfie!

Our most recent get-together was for the Mid-Autumn Festival. Because a majority of our classmates are Chinese international students, we wanted to celebrate this important holiday as a reminder of home. We had some delicious mooncake, saw the moon, and played fun icebreaker games.

Another selfie!

Of course, it isn’t all fun and games.  The parties must be balanced with our rigorous coursework. So far, this semester has been busier than any of my time in undergrad. And from what the second-year MBLE students have said, it won’t be slowing down anytime soon (a popular saying among the second-years is “MBLEs never sleep”). On top of this, we have career fairs to worry about and some of us even have part-time jobs. However, I believe I can speak for the rest of my classmates: we wouldn’t trade it for anything. There’s a reason Fisher’s MBLE program is one of the most highly ranked in the country (https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools/logistics-rankings); we know that once we finish the program we will be among the most qualified graduates in the country. And it has already shown at career fairs. Many of us have gotten interviews, despite being in the program for just a few short weeks.

As we continue our program we must strive to find balance. While having too much fun is obviously detrimental, we cannot spend all of our time studying, either. And yes, there will be some late nights in Gerlach Hall, but there will also be some late nights in Ohio Stadium. My classmates and I look forward to the fun times, and the stressful times, as the semester continues.

Go Bucks!

 

What Has Impressed Us? Let’s Hear From International Students!

On the morning of August 4, 2018, I jumped into a host’s car to start my journey in Columbus. With jazz music playing on the radio, I was attracted to what I call “new antique-style” buildings—those with a rusty, red-brick color. A short time later I asked my host, “When will we arrive at the Ohio State campus?” She responded, “Oh, we’re already here.” We had already been driving around campus for a number of minutes! I was impressed by the expansive campus, specifically because university campuses in my country are much, much smaller. I could not believe that I was joining a campus 238 times larger than my former one!

My name is Ting Fan Chang, and I am from Taiwan. I previously studied Public Health at Taipei Medical University, and I am currently pursuing an MBA degree at the Fisher College of Business. Fisher definitely delivers when it comes to resource availability. Specifically, I have only been here for six weeks and I have already attended several key events, such as the Fisher Fall Career Fair, the Fisher Graduate Student Career Fair, a variety of company information sessions, and many others. Fisher students have many opportunities to build connections with company recruiters and gain detailed information on full-time job and internship opportunities. More importantly, at Fisher, students are able to utilize the Office of Career Management for insightful, one-on-one sessions with the Office’s many career consultants. The OCM team gives customized advice corresponding to each student’s particular background and interests.

To gain some other perspectives, I interviewed other first-year international students at Fisher to learn about their stories, and what they’ve experienced in the last couple months at Fisher, OSU, and throughout Columbus. Here is what they had to say:

Sai Chandra Pujita Vazrala — Guntur, India

Q: What is your impression of the Fisher MBA classroom setting?

A: Fisher MBA classrooms are interactive and relaxed – different from the more formal setting back in my home country. Students are encouraged to contribute to discussions and meaningfully challenge each other’s viewpoints. Overall, an engaging and dynamic classroom environment!

Q: What is your favorite aspect of being a part of the Fisher MBA program?

A: I truly believe that the biggest advantage of being a part of the Fisher MBA program is its diversity! We are exposed to a great blend of not only cultural diversity, but also professional diversity, in an intimate setting. I hope to learn more about the intricacies of what makes us the professionals and individuals that we are, while building a lasting network for years to come!


Fahd Jehangir Lahore, Pakistan

Q: What do you think is the biggest advantage of the Fisher MBA program?

A: The faculty and Office of Career Management staff are extremely approachable, helpful and dedicated. You feel lucky to be part of the FTMBA batch by the sheer level of resources dedicated to your success.

Q: What do people do for fun in Columbus?

A: It all depends on what you want to do. If you’re a sports lover, it takes almost no time to plan a pickup game of soccer, basketball, volleyball, what have you, within the class. If you’re interested in nightlife, there are tons of domestic students who will not only guide you to the best spots in town, but also invite you to join in!

Q: What is your most impressive experience since arriving at OSU?

A: Within one month of arriving at OSU, I was hosted by more than five domestic students, and many more international students. I’ve made many new friends and gotten to know almost everyone in my MBA class. Yet everyday someone’s new experiences are shared in class. The level of diversity and intellect accumulated within the MBA group is fascinating!


Chih Chien (Jeff) Chiu Tainan, Taiwan

Q: What is your most impressive experience since arriving at OSU?

A: Comprehensive career services at Fisher amaze me because they personalize their support and allow us to leverage the power of such a large university. Compared to business schools in my home country, Fisher provides more customized career consultants, broad alumni networking, recruiting events, and career workshops. All of these resources along with solid technical training help us effectively stand out among others.


Rattaporn Puikaew Bangkok, Thailand

Q: What do you like to do for fun in Columbus?

A: Classes are wonderful, but we know, spending time outside with super cool, new friends is way more enjoyable! There are copious interesting places to explore near OSU’s campus: cool bars in Short North, the vintage-style book loft in German Village, and many more fun activities always going on. Most importantly, the Buckeye football games are huge! To be honest, the first game of the season was my ‘Football 101’ experience. I’m not a big sports fan, but time will be well spent cheering on the team and watching with friends! (Warning: remember to buy tickets for the whole season – it’s a must!) If you’re not a big sports fan like me, Friday nights with friends are another way to get together and let loose! To me, hanging out with friends is the fastest and easiest way to get to know each other. (Hint: the best moments are ones we all share!)

 

 

Career Fair Realness

With the Fisher Career and Internship Fair behind me, I’ve finally taken the time to reflect on the experience. While the dust still settles, I figured I’d take a few minutes to give out Alex’s Top 3 Tips for Succeeding at the Career Fair/Interviewing Process:

Dress Confidently

Case in point: my new suit + ties + shoes = $600-$700. That’s not money that a lot of people just having lying around. I work full-time and that still took time to save up!

A lot of times, folks will tell you to “dress professionally” which means “wear a suit” or whatever your gender equivalent of a suit is. While obviously suits are a great way to go, I say dress CONFIDENTLY for two reasons:

  1. Not everybody can afford a suit.
  2. You will literally be in a sea of suits and standing out isn’t always a bad thing.

So wear something nice that works for your price range and comfort level. Personally, I was very lucky to be able to afford a new suit and pair of dress shoes for the career fair, but that may not be your story. If you end up not being able to rock a suit-like option, maybe even make a little light-hearted joke during the opening like I used to before I could afford a suit.

After you explain your genuine interest in the company (we’ll talk more about this later) finish with “and I’m REALLY excited to get this internship/job so I can afford my first suit!” Say it with a smile and they’ll probably love it.

Don’t be a robot

Unless you’re RoboCop, then for sure be a robot.

Now, joking during an interview isn’t for everybody, so you have to do what feels comfortable when talking with employers and recruiters (are you sensing a theme yet?). That being said, these folks are going to meet and interview dozens of people over the next few days, and that doesn’t even stack up to how many people they may interact with all together.

Obviously, be professional and respectful of their time, but if you sit there and just regurgitate answers that you’ve obsessed over the past week or two, they’re going to get bored or at the very least they’re not going to remember you.

When they ask about who you are,  talk about something more than just your professional passions. Do you have a pet you love? Maybe a fun hobby? I always mention at the end of my “about me” section that my main three passions in life are education, diversity and inclusion, and my dog, Bernie. This usually shows that I’m not just some mindless worker drone, but I’m an actual person who they can connect with on a personal level.

Don’t be afraid to show a little bit of who you are and you’ll be great.

And finally..

You have about five minutes at most, so be memorable

This is something nobody really told me about when I was prepping for the career fair, and is was probably the most shocking. You walk up to the booth, get noticed by a recruiter, they take your resume and maybe take a picture (you sometimes fill out a quick questionnaire on an tablet), and then you get to do an elevator pitch. Maybe they’ll ask you a follow up, maybe they just tell you about the next steps in their process…and then that’s it.

Note: Wearing a beekeeper outfit is not what I mean by “being memorable”

It’s quick, it feels slightly awkward, and I can only imagine the amount of hand shaking that goes down. It’s not the recruiter’s fault, I remember some lines being wrapped around the ball room, with undergraduates and graduates patiently waiting for their few precious minutes. I’m not knocking the system at all, but what I am saying is that you have a short amount of time to make a good impression, so you have to make it. To borrow the iconic words of a meme, you have to shoot your shot.

Introduce yourself confidentially, talk about a few key things about your experiences that you think stand out or that you’re most proud of, be upfront that you’re interested (if you are, don’t lie) and would like to know the next steps of their process. This will, hopefully, signal to them you’re the real deal and are worth their time to interview. Add in tip one and two and you’re on your way to getting a job/internship!

So there you have it, Alex’s Top 3 Tips for Succeeding at the Career Fair/Interviewing Process. I can’t guarantee your success, but I’ve found past success with these few tips. As long as you’re honest about who you are and what you what from/in an employer, you’ll be fine!

Good luck with the internship/job search and may the odds be ever in your favor!

My GAP Experience: Italy and Germany

Fisher MBA students often talk about GAP. What exactly is GAP and why is it such a focal point of our program?

Global Applied Projects (GAP) is an opportunity for MBA students to gain international consulting experience by working on a business challenge in a global location (non-US). It is a three-credit, graded, elective course that allows students to lead, plan, and execute global consulting engagements across multiple functional areas for a wide variety of corporations, not-for-profits, and governments in locations outside of the US. A typical GAP project timeline looks like this:

January: Project client and Office of Global Business work to define the business problem and formulate a high-level scope.

Late February: Student participation begins with the section of MBA team members chosen to meet the needs of the project.

Next 10 weeks: Team is directed by a second-year MBA team coach and a faculty functional expert. Students attend weekly classes that teach best practices in project management and global consulting, and develop cultural awareness. They also meet regularly with teams, advisors, coaches, and clients, and submit class assignments that support the development and execution of the projects.

May: Three-week, in-country, primary research phase with a presentation of findings, an in-depth analysis, and specific, actionable recommendations to the client.

As a second-year MBA student, I would love to share with you my most recent GAP experience, where I had the opportunity to work with Technical Rubber Company, based in Johnstown, OH, as well as Salvadori, based in Rovereto, Italy. 

 

 

Client: Technical Rubber Company

Team members: Luke Barousse, Abhishek Chakrabarti, Adam Kanter, Andris Koh, Vaibhav Meharwade, Carl Shapiro, Sangyoun Shin, Kristen Stubbs

Cities/Countries we visited: Rovereto, Italy, and Munich, Germany

Activities: Visited TRC’s corporate headquarters, Salvadori’s headquarters, as well as attended the World’s Leading Trade Fair for Water, Sewage, Waste and Raw Materials Management.

At the World’s Leading Trade Fair for Water, Sewage, Waste and Raw Materials Management
World’s Largest Tire at Salvadori’s Headquarters

 

Project Title: Rubber Molded Products Business Plan

Objective: To define a pathway for TRC to forward integrate from the equipment business to manufacturing and selling products made from recycled rubber.

Submitted Deliverables: A 100-page business plan that contained our industry analysis, strategic recommendations, as well as financial, operational, and marketing plans. We also delivered a final presentation to TRC’s and Salvadori’s executives.

What were some takeaways from this GAP experience?

1. Even though I had no experience in the manufacturing or recycled rubber industry, I was extremely fascinated by it. By keeping an open mind, as well as the willingness to learn, changed my perspective of recycled rubber and the manufacturing industry.

An espresso vending machine

2. Italians absolutely love good food, wine, and espresso.

Best pasta ever had

3. Working in a team of eight within close parameters is not easy. There were many memorable moments, but there were also moments of tension. It is important to talk through these issues, instead of letting emotions breed over time.

4. Take some down time for yourself. I decided to stroll along the river one evening in Rovereto, where I enjoyed the perfect sunset with a glass of wine.

Rovereto, Italy

5. Communication is key. One of our team members was unable to travel internationally, so we had to find a way to deal with different time zones, interact and engage with our teammate, as well as communicate in a way that made him feel as part of the team even though we were not physically together.

6. Take time on the weekends to explore nearby cities, take a break from work, and enjoy the beautiful scenery. I visited Rome, Venice, and spent the last weekend in Munich visiting the Neuschwanstein castle.

Rome
Venice
Munich

7. Rely on each other’s strengths to get things done efficiently. For example, when we were working on the business plan, we had Carl work on designing our logos, Sangyoun/myself on market research, Adam/Abhi on financials, Luke/Vaibhav on technical viability, and Kristen in putting things together. We each had our own strengths and we used them to maximize our output.

8. Having the opportunity to work as a consultant for a global client is something really unique and special. I know that having these relationships with clients and colleagues will carry into the future as I embark on more global projects in my career.

Original Hofbrauhaus
Our Team!
Pork knuckle, anyone?

 

 

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

It’s day one, and we’re excited to begin a new chapter. We’re all bright-eyed and in a new environment, with new people, with multiple expectations, and with thoughts of what’s the year going to be like.

Then day two comes. We’ve sat through all our first days of classes and received our syllabi. Panic sets in, worry seeps through, and we’re sitting there with “omg” looks on our faces. We knew going back to school to pursue our MBAs wasn’t going to be a walk in the park, but little did we know just how far off we were.

Skimming though the syllabi, nervous and uncertain about how we’re going to handle everything makes the future look scary. Day two is probably the first day anxiety hit. As we head into week five, we’ve already been stuck at Gerlach Hall until late at night, probably sleep deprived, and feeling like we’re barely making it through. There are classes, student organizations, activities, cases, job search and preparation, and hundreds of other things we’ve all just dived right into and have on our plate, and now we’re swimming in the unknown. It’s during these highly stressful times that it’s important to take some precautions. First and foremost, make sure to give yourself some “ME” time. Your health and well-being are most important, so managing stress is key.

Here’s what I like to do to de-stress. I like to start off each week by writing out my weekly schedule and to-do list. Afterwards I’ll make sure I at least give myself a break during the weekend. Over the weekend, I usually sleep in to catch up on missed sleep. I’ll catch up on my favorite shows for an hour or two. Right now, I’m watching Power. It’s amazing!

Going out for a walk helps me get in the right headspace to get ready for my day and to process everything. I’ll usually call my family and talk to them. It makes me happy to hear their voices and to have them reassure me that I’m in the right place and doing what I need to do to reach my dreams.

One activity I recently started trying was yoga. I was very skeptical at first, but it really helps you meditate and relax the mind to be present in the now. It forced me to stop my mind from racing and to feel a sense of peace.

On weekends, I like going out with my friends to different events like football games, speaker events, or to new places that we haven’t been to on Ohio State’s campus or in the city, like the Easton area. The outlet there will give you a nice shopping experience. I’ve also ventured out to downtown Columbus for a Food Truck Festival. This is where I had Jeni’s, a famous ice cream spot here, for the first time, and ate the juiciest and most seasoned jerk chicken I’ve ever had. I’m from Chicago, and we have amazing food, so I was shocked to be so impressed by all the restaurants I’ve been to so far.

Going out is probably a #1 go-to for most people to de-stress, which is great because it’s also important to socialize and let loose a bit. Watching movies or TV, going for a run, shopping, adventuring around Columbus, meditating, getting a massage, the list goes on and on for things to do for “ME” time.

We need to remember that, yes, we’re here for a reason and it’s going to be tough, but our journey throughout the MBA program should be an exciting one.

Some of my classmates ride bikes on the Olentangy Trail, go bar crawling, play soccer, go to the ARC to workout, or even use meditation apps like this one called Headspace. You know what kinds of things and activities bring joy to you. What you need to do is make sure you manage your time, prioritize YOU, connect with others when the stress seems unbearable, and keep your head up.

Remember that you were chosen to be here for a reason, remember why you decided to be here, and lean on each other through the good and the bad times. We all came in together, and we’re all going to survive and successfully leave together.

Professional Networking Event and Career Fair

Hello everyone!

I started writing this post on my way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as I was heading out to a Professional Conference & Networking event organized by a professional organization called Prospanica. I was given the opportunity to attend the conference by the Fisher College of Business Office of Diversity and Inclusion, as well as the Office of Career Management at Fisher.

Fisher students at the 39th Prospanica Conference

This year, five master students—3 MBAs and 2 SMFs from the Fisher College of Business—participated in the 37th Prospanica Conference. The purpose of the organization is to connect Latino students and other diverse student populations with employers and recruiters from Fortune 500 companies.

All of us had the opportunity to practice our elevator pitch with many recruiters and had the chance to interview on-site. Some companies that were present during the conference were Google, Nike, Nintendo, Nationwide, Northwestern Mutual, Henkel, GE Healthcare, CenturyLink, John Deere, Federal Reserve, Eaton, among others.

The Prospanica Conference is only one of the many events that are supported by Fisher, OCM and ODI. This coming week, there is another Conference for the National Black MBA Association that I know many graduate students will be attending. I would like to thank both OCM and ODI for this opportunity, and wish all the best to students attending future conferences.

Now, I am ready to go back to campus and continue studying for my first data analysis midterm; hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and all that fun stuff.

Me for the next five days

Cheers and go Bucks!

Ferny