Posts filed under 'Student Organizations'



Business School, Or Why I’m Enjoying Not Having a Minute of Free Time

Business school is filled with reading, class, club information sessions, studying and professors with fancy hair (maybe too fancy?). But that probably describes every business school in these United States. Every school has a finance association and every school has textbooks and every school has quiet rooms. But Fisher and The Ohio State University has so much more than that and as I told a second year, “I can’t handle myself right now.”

Your views are not appreciated here, Business Cat

Your views are not appreciated at Fisher, Business Cat

I could describe abstractly my schedule and everything I’ve had to do in the month plus I’ve been at Ohio State coming from New Jersey and another huge state school in Rutgers. I could just say you could get lost in everything here, but I think there’s a better way to do this: I’m going to lay out as much of my schedule on Monday September 16, 2014 as I possibly can. It may seem like a crowded day, but I promise this is pretty much what every Monday is going to be for me for the foreseeable future, so here it is COMIN’ AT YOU HARD.

8-8:30AM: Print out Econ discussion questions for that sweet participation credit.

8:30-10:00AM: Accounting class featuring Jolly Bob’s Jerk Joint and joining intramural flag football leagues. I am a good student I swear.

10:15-11:45AM: Econ class! A blur of supply and demand curves even a day later. Reminiscing about Jolly Bob’s.

12-1PM: 3M Marketing Info Session: Free lunch! It was sammiches. And free pens! Oh and learning about 3M’s marketing internships and full time opportunities.

1-2PM: I exercise/listen to the Pitch Perfect Soundtrack. Barden Bellas 4 lyfe.

2:30-3PM: The two team captains for intramural football draft our players. It can get challenging determining the net present value of Ryan McClellan vs. Adam Tedrick. I should be doing work now butttttttt….no.

3-7PM: Studying for Marketing Math Quiz tomorrow and realizing I don’t have a calculator. I buy a $3.50 one from the bookstore. It does not have exponents. Also studying marketing cases and doing finance homework. I realize (have it reinforced, more likely) that I have no idea what is going on in finance. This is important as the midterm is 3 days away. I need to pack in all this studying for tomorrow because the day’s about to go sideways.

7:30-8:45PM: Intramural Soccer. I’m also one of the captains for one of our two intramural flag football teams. While the football one entails duties like drafting people you know and pretending to be Urban Meyer, the soccer iteration involves bothering people endlessly to get them to officially sign up and telling them where the hidden field at Lincoln Tower Park is. But hey we won 7-6! Woo go Fisher Gray!

9-10PM: Go home and lay facedown drinking Gatorade. But today’s not over because I’m dumb.

10:30-12: Go play intramural Broomball with people I don’t know. I am a crazy person. It’s played with sneakers on a normal ice rink. I fell on my butt about 12 times and sent part of a broom almost into the stands that were filled with kids with nothing better to do than laugh at me fall on my face (no it was funny I don’t blame them). I did not know this sport existed before OSU and now I have a sore butt from it. Oh and we lost.

1AM: Finally eat dinner. Subway was literally the only thing open since McDonalds switched to their breakfast menu at midnight. I do not like eggs so this did not fly.

2AM: Bed.

7AM: Study for marketing math quiz.

SOOOO that was my day and a little added afterward. It may seem like I was annoyed or frustrated with the day, but there are just so many opportunities to take advantage of at Ohio State and Fisher. If I went to a smaller school or one with fewer opportunities, my day could have been over early and I could have been sleeping by 11. But why waste what’s out there? You’re not going to find stuff like this everywhere or maybe anywhere else.

 


Welcome Fisher MBA Class of 2016

Fisher Campus

It was a warm morning. Not too uncomfortable, although it left little doubt that the afternoon would be quite hot. As if I didn’t have enough on my mind already while making my way across the Fisher campus, I now had to brood over the efficiency of the off-brand antiperspirant I was wearing. Coming up to Schoenbaum Hall,  I took one last glance at the Pre-Term schedule I had printed out the night before to make sure I was in the right place, heaved one last heavy breath, and entered the building.

The door opened into a small corridor brimming with well-dressed men and women, acquainting and socializing, demonstrating their varied levels of networking competence. Striding across the corridor, from handshake to handshake, I felt as if my mind was hosting a potluck attended by two dozen different versions of myself, each bringing a different emotion. I was excited; I was nervous. I was confident; I was diffident. I was calm; I was frantic.

An administrator directed us through two sets of doors leading into a large lecture hall with stadium seating. I found a seat and continued to converse with my neighbors, trying desperately to remember their names without looking at their name tags. The murmuring in the halls quieted down as the administrator stepped forth once again and, to a roaring applause, officially welcomed the Fisher MBA Class of 2016 to the Pre-Term Orientation.

What transpired over the following week and a half of orientation is far too much to detail in just one blog post, but in summary, it was truly an uplifting and apprehension-slaying event. It was an exciting blend of macro and micro insights into the adventure my class and I are about to begin. Between meeting my classmates, getting assigned my cohort (shout out to Team 11!), learning about all the student groups and opportunities, lectures from such distinguished guests as the CEO of Sherwin-Williams, Christopher Connor, and activities such as team-building exercises at Summit Vision – which was far more enjoyable and of practical use than my skeptical mind expected – orientation provided an excellent introduction to this new chapter in my life.

I’ve come a long way to get here (more on that in another post). As bumpy as the road was at times, I’m sure ahead it will be even more long and winding. Great changes come prepackaged with great uncertainty. I might not be venturing into the last frontier, but I am running full-speed into my own unknown with nothing but drive and optimism providing bright but limited lighting. But as far as I can tell, I couldn’t ask for better resources to help guide me along the way than those which I have found at the Fisher College of Business at THE Ohio State University.


The Buddy Program

This year the Fisher MBA has a new program: The Buddy Program.  This program was spear-headed by the Class of 2015, who felt it would be beneficial to the incoming first year class to have a second year mentor – someone to ask where the quiet study room is (in the basement, across from the lockers), or where the best place to grab lunch is (the verdict is still out), or to ask questions about major classes, clubs, conferences, and the internship search.

But the Buddy Program is also about friendship.  “We want you all to feel included,” Edwin, a second year leadership and organizational behavior major said. “We want you to be part of the program and help you in any way we can.”  Edwin’s attitude has been echoed in the actions of every second year I have met – and I’ve met the majority of them.  The second years have made a point to be involved in our orientation and to invite us to club and social events.  At Fisher, you don’t come in with 120 friends, you come in with 240.

The first Buddy Program event of the year was this past Friday.  Everyone who signed up for the Buddy Program met at the Varsity Club.  My buddy, Doris, e-mailed me before the event to introduce herself and to reassure me that she would be at the event.  When I got to the Varsity Club, it was packed with MBA’s.

“We didn’t know how many people would show up,” I overheard someone say.  A lot. A lot showed up.  In fact, so many first years signed up for the program that several second years, Doris included, had two first year buddies.  I managed to find Doris and Coralia, another first year, and we talked about our backgrounds, potential majors and career paths, and Doris’s insights on her two (Yes, two.  Did I mention that my buddy is brilliant?) summer internships for what felt like five minutes, but was really almost an hour and a half.  We left the event with plans to meet for lunch, and word on the street is that there might be a second Buddy event later this semester.

To say the Buddy Program is a success would be an understatement, and although this is a new program, I think it’s one my class, and the classes that come after us, will continue.

 

 


MAcc Scrapbook

How the time has flown! I have gone from being a prospective MAcc student reading the My Fisher Grad Life Blog and wondering why some authors didn’t post more, to being a soon-to-be graduate who is impressed they posted so much! The past nine months have been the most intense period of self-growth and change I have ever experienced in my life. I met so many amazing people and was exposed to different perspectives on life and business. I know I will walk into my first full time job as a finance auditor at the Auditor of State’s office better prepared to be a successful professional thanks to my time at Fisher.

Here is a small sample of some of the things I was doing over the past year while I was too busy to blog:

50 Yard Line

Standing on the football field during Orientation

Class

Inside Arya’s Management and Control class

Corn maze

Heading into the corn maze at Circle S Farms

Picking pumpkins

Picking pumpkins!

Thao

I managed to get out and see Thao and the Get Down Stay Down and Neko Case at the Newport, a concert venue on High St. across from campus

Neko

Neko Case

Foxy!

Me and my boyfriend Brent all dressed up and ready to go to the Fisher Grad Student Halloween party

Fraud: never worth it

Aaron Beam talks about drugs, SEC and rock and roll during his MAcc talk

Held at the Faculty Club

The Class of 14 at the MAcc winter dinner

Christmas in bloom

A winter break girls day out to the Franklin Park Conservatory. Left to right: Liana, Lina, Dongqi, Yeajung and me

Our professor then hosted the speaker at his house

Barry Hoffman speaks to our Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions class about the Valassis-ADVO merger

Book your group ahead of time!

A bunch of hungry MAcc student getting pizza after hunting for a place to play lazer tag

The food was delicious!

I didn’t get pictures at the FISA’s Holi dinner so I snapped a selfie with my friend Ping before our Advanced Negotiations class

Tip: Place your napkin on your lap immediately when you sit down

My table at the MHRM etiquette dinner

The last ever MAcc talk, given by OSU's own Dr. Zhang on accounting research (my camera created the rainbow effect)

The last ever MAcc talk, given by OSU’s own Dr. Zhang on accounting research (my camera created the rainbow effect)

Group photo of MAcc students and alumni who participated in the spring MAcc gives back event. I helped organize the Dress for Success store in the Short North

Group photo of MAcc students and alumni who participated in the spring MAcc gives back event. I helped organize the Dress for Success store in the Short North

Also: travelling to Africa alone, working with Steve Jobs and her non-profit Free the Tampons

Nancy Kramer of Resource Marketing speaks to our Advanced Leadership class about her leadership legacy

AKA Grad School Prom

Action shot of the Fisher Formal

Me and my boyfriend Brent dressed up at the Fisher Formal

Me and my boyfriend Brent dressed up at the Fisher Formal

My friend Lina and I at the Formal

My friend Lina and I at the Formal

He plays the best music before class!

My last ever class- Dr. Mittendorf’s Non-Profit and Governmental Accounting course.


Benefits of the Fisher Corporate Mentor Program

Last year I had the opportunity to participate in Fisher’s Corporate Mentor program. The program pairs first year MBAs with local executives from Columbus that are interested in helping mentor and develop students in their chosen career field. I couldn’t have asked for a better mentor last year and truly enjoyed the relationship we developed during the program. This year, I reached out to a first year student to gain their perspective and see if their experience was similar to mine.

Below is a question and answer session I had with Megan Tuetken, first year MBA with a focus on marketing.

 1 – Who is your corporate mentor and what is their background?
My mentor is Mary Beth Cowardin from T. Marzetti’s.  She is the Director of Marketing for the Marzetti brand.  She did her undergrad at OSU and earned her MBA from Fisher.

2 – What were you hoping to gain from participating in the corporate mentor program?
I wanted a non-student/non-professor sounding board to talk to about my internship search and seek advice. I was also looking for a professional perspective on life in the corporate world of marketing.  I was hoping for a mentor in brand management to get an additional perspective to compare to what I’d experienced working with brand managers at Kimberly-Clark over the years.

3 – What have the events been like? Have you been able to meet other students’ mentors?
I did not attend the kick-off event as my mentor was not able to attend.  Instead, I met Mary Beth for breakfast one morning for our first official introduction.  We’ve done breakfast a few times to catch up and chat, and we’ve found that this casual approach has worked well for us.  I went to the event at the Thompson Library, which was pretty informal.  There were quite a few mentor/student pairs.  Some were simply chatting as pairs while others were mingling as larger groups.  I mostly talked with Mary Beth directly as I was in the middle of some critical decisions regarding my internship opportunities.  However, the chance to meet other mentors was definitely available.  I did meet a former colleague of Mary Beth’s briefly.

The last event, which was targeted towards Marketing students/mentors, provided much more of an opportunity to meet other mentors as we were forced to switch our table arrangements throughout the event.  It was great to hear other professionals talk about their experiences regarding a host of business topics.

4 – What is the best piece of advice you have received from your mentor?
My mentor was very helpful in giving feedback regarding my resume.  She helped me expand it quite a bit and pushed me to really capture additional items that I wasn’t really considering.  She also helped me realize which direction I wanted to go with my internship.

5 – Would you recommend the corporate mentor program to other students? If so, why?
I would definitely recommend it.  I’ve had a very positive experience so far, and I plan to stay connected to Mary Beth in the future.  Even though the formally planned events through Fisher are complete, she’s going to give me a plant tour and we’re planning on doing a store walk-through so I can learn more about the categories Marzetti plays in.

To me, it’s a no-brainer to sign up for a mentor.  Fisher has so many amazing alumni and local businesspeople to tap for mentorship.  There’s absolutely no reason not to do it!  I know some students have had better connections than others, but it’s also what each person makes of it.  I found that having a goal for the relationship (for me, it was mostly about the internship search) really helped.  I’m glad to have participated and made a new connection in my network for the future.


Happy Lunar New Year From Fisher

photo-CNY2Every year the Fisher College of Business hosts an evening to celebrate Chinese New Year. This event is one of the favorites for many students. Here’s why:

  • Great entertainment from many Chinese students- this includes, singing, dancing, playing musical instruments, and much more!
  • Fun games for all attendees, including children. The event isn’t only for graduate students, but for members of the faculty and community. This truly is one of the best attended events every year!
  • Incredible Chinese food is brought in from a local restaurant. Not to worry, the Americans aren’t selecting the restaurant, we leave it to the experts to choose which offering is the most authentic!
  • A glimpse into another culture. Because many students at Fisher aren’t Chinese, or have never been to China, the celebration allows others to have an educational experience as well. For me, this is one of the reasons why I find this event so enjoyable.

 


AMP Super Bowl Ad Review

One of the many enjoyable aspects of being a full-time MBA student is that so many great student organizations exist in which anyone can be a part of. Student organizations range in size from large to small, depending on the interest in the organizations subject matter and activities. One of the organizations here at Fisher that I have been a  part of is AMP – the Association of Marketing Professionals.

The last few years AMP has held an activity in conjunction with the Super Bowl. For most marketers, watching the commercials on Super Bowl Sunday is just as entertaining as watching the big game. This is also true for MBA students.

In order to take advantage of some great learning opportunities that come from viewing the Super Bowl, AMP held its annual Super Bowl Ad Review a few days ago. The event always brings in a large crowd of students interested in learning more about creative advertising and why some commercials are received well and why others fall on their face – even when spending $4 million for 30 seconds.

This year was fun because we were able to hear from two marketing professors as well as a Fisher alumnus, Jason Mlicki, who owns his own advertising agency (Rattleback) here in Columbus. Jason has worked in the advertising world for quite sometime and brought a great perspective to many of the ads that we viewed.

A few of the favorites that the professors and Jason shared with the class included Audi, Hyundai, Radio Shack, and Heinz. I personally enjoyed the Audi and Hyundai commercials. They both had different strategies and tactics used throughout their creative, but I believe they both communicated effectively to their audience. Here is the Hyundai commercial for your viewing pleasure! Go Bucks!


Bid Often & Bid High

Back in November, Fisher Follies held their yearly auction – and it was an INCREDIBLE NIGHT. Now, I am on the Follies Steering Committee, so I might be a little biased :)

For those who don’t know, Fisher Follies is a student organization with a lot heart and even more personality. Follies strives to celebrate and leverage the camaraderie of all Fisher students, faculty and staff in order to raise money for the “Fisher Community Fund”. This is a special fund that assist Fisher students who find themselves facing unexpected hardships. Bottom line, it strengthens the Fisher family and allows us to help another. Which in one of my favorite things about this school.

Auction items are donated by faculty, staff and students and range in all sizes and prices. There is a Silent and Live Auction, so the event is great for everyone.

For the Silent Auction, I donated coffee for a week – you text me, I bring you coffee! Other examples of donations include beautifully decorated cookies, dinner for two at Hyde Park, rounds of golf, even manual labor!

The Live Auction is where the big items come to the spotlight. These include tickets for the OSU/Michigan game, a private tour of the Watershed Distillery, brewing beers with Professor Campbell and rides in one of Professor Rucci’s classic cars. The list goes on and on — I had to keep a tight grip on my purse, I wanted to bid on everything!!

The prizes are fantastic, and the entire evening is full of laughs…and quite a bit of competitive bidding. Students dress up in cocktail attire (hey, it beats business professional) and make it a night to remember.

The next Follies event is the Variety Show in February – see you there!

Lindsey and I ready for the night!

 

Auctioneers bidding off “Pie a Michigan Fan!”

 

Good lookin’ group of 1st Year MBAs

 

This little princess came to the auction as well!

 

Todd (1sr yr MBA) and Jenn (Fisher Advisor) having a blast at the Follies Auction

 


Operations, anyone?

Last week I had the opportunity to attend not one, but two Operations related Career Conference events and they were awesome! First, there was the Annual “Links Symposium” sponsored by the Operations and Logistics Management Association, and I volunteered to help organize this event, being a member of OLMA myself.

The half – day event was hosted at The Blackwell Inn, Fisher’s own hotel and Executive Conference Center. This year’s topic was Lean Management, and there were two discussion panels, one for Lean Management in Manufacturing and the other Lean Management in Services. For all the Ops and Supply Chain Majors out there, this was a fantastic opportunity to interact and network

At the OLMA Links Symposium

with the panelists, who were a mix of academic faculty and industry experts from companies such as Greif, Huntington, Cardinal Health etc. To top it all, we had a great moderator – Georgia Keresty, a lean expert with more than 30 + years of experience. 

The very next morning I attended an Operations Career Change Round table event hosted by the Working Professional MBA Program. Fisher’s apt selection of the panelists should not go unmentioned. The 4 WP panelists were each from different areas of Operations – the distribution side, Supply chain side, the IT side and the customer side. It led to a very interesting Q and A session where they shared valuable stories from their work experiences and advice on how we could better ourselves to become ideal hiring candidates for Operations Management roles in top companies.

The biggest perk in attending these kinds of events is that you get to meet such vibrant personalities who are willing to help you in your career any way they can . Drawing from their experiences is a big plus, and ultimately helps you in connecting with more people in the field of your interest. Kudos to Fisher faculty and the COE , for their amazing contributions year after year and a special thanks to Fisher alumni who are so eager to give back to the business community – you are invaluable resources to the current students and one of Fisher’s greatest assets.

And these networking events are right at your doorstep. My advice is to never let these chances slip, because these are golden opportunities that can lead to lifelong career connections. Boy, am I glad I came to Business school :)

With WP alums Megan and Jonathan at the Ops Career Change Roundtable


The Family Man (Not Nicholas Cage…)

 

It’s ok…It will be alright.

This is for all of the spouses and parents out there.  I thought coming to Fisher the thing I would get in 2 years would be an MBA, but I quickly learned that I was gaining a whole new discipline in the process.  As a husband and father who wanted to be around his family, I knew coming to business school was going to be challenging both inside and outside the classroom.  However, I feel that having a family has actually made me be better as a student and at home.  The three things I have learned through this process have been:

  1. Time Management: You just have to be good at managing your time.  I don’t have a lot of margins in my life right now, so it’s a sink or swim situation.  Often when you’re in this spot, not having a choice can actually push you to be better than you might have chosen on your own.
  2. Devote time to thinking about what’s important: The forethought you put into what you want to get out of business school is positively correlated (what’s up data analysis!?) with the opportunities you’ll be able to take advantage of while here.  There are a ton of events and if you don’t know what you want things may pass you by without you realizing it.  Better to be prepared and do the heavy lifting on the front end.
  3. Learn to say no: Like I referred to in point #2, there are a ton of events out there.  The temptation is to go to all of them.  It’s a temptation because there are a ton of awesome and interesting events.  Otherwise, it wouldn’t be a temptation, right?  Well, due to family parameters, I can’t go to everything, but I can go to the events I’m really interested in and passionate about.  That’s where the power of saying no comes in.  You have to pick your battles, and part of that is saying no to good things in order to say yes to great ones.

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