Posts filed under 'Class'



Time Management: It’s a Thing

This guy set the bar pretty high for the rest of us bloggers when he wrote about his 11-year-old self coming up with a pretty sound proposition for Barnes and Noble employees to let him buy a not-so-11-year-old-friendly CD. But not all of us have that much swagger.

In fact, it was a shock I got into the Fisher MHRM program at all as I tend to stumble over words when put on the spot. One of my interview questions was, “What recent news stories regarding business have you heard?” My response? “Umm…we don’t have cable…but I do know that Bob Costas who reports on the olympics has an eye infection so he just had Matt Lauer take over. Ahem…must be some sort of PR move.” I’m not kidding. My exact thoughts were [insert favorite expletive here]. And you know what happened literally a month and a half earlier? The Target security breach. Face/palm.

What I am good at is time management (great segue, right?) Having an active two-year-old while reading, writing, organizing group projects, and studying for classes has definitely been a challenge. Unlike my undergrad self, I’ve learned that time management is actually a THING. And incredibly helpful (sorry to point out the obvious). What are your priorities? What’s at the top of that list? Get it done. What’s next? Get it done and check that off of your list as well. Repeat repeat repeat.

My main priority: Making sure my kid feels valued. Is he learning? Is he eating? Is he having fun while avoiding activities that have the potential to cause severe injury? Yes? Good. Next thing.

Reading for class. With a two year old, it’s been surprisingly manageable.

Parenting Win

What’s better than making the bed? Teaching a two-year-old about economics and HR’s role within business.

Next priority: studying for tests. In the MHRM program, our first test was almost immediately after the semester began. I have learned that I’m a visual learner (as well as experiential…but generally most everyone learns from experience). I can’t just read and memorize. I have be able to see it it. In my undergrad, I learned a trick that has never let me down: color coding.

I will only take notes in black or blue ink. Before I begin fully studying for a test, I condense my notes from the readings and class into the information I think is the most important and will likely be on the test. Instead of writing these notes in black or blue ink, I use a weird color. Red, pink, green, etc. I then use another color to underline and emphasize things I am positive will be on the test. It ends up looking something like this:

Color Coded Test Notes

Color Coded Test Notes

Using colors I’m not used to seeing in my notes has been a successful study approach for me. It allows me to visualize my study notes. I’m happy to report I did very well on my first test, thanks to time management and color coded test notes.

Rather than focusing on what you’re not-so-good at (like talking about the possible business implications of Bob Costas’ eye infection), focus on what you’re great at. What you’re great at is likely what got you (or will get you) into the Fisher College of Business and will definitely help you succeed in your program.

Time management is my thing. I doubted myself entering grad school with a kid and having different priorities. But after the results of my first test, I know I’ve got this.


Midterms, Quizzes, and Cases … Oh my!

Reality hit this last week … grad school is not all fun and games. We Fisher MAcc students had multiple midterms/quizzes/case studies/assignments and they all seemed to fall on the same couple of days. Isn’t that how it always works out? In order to keep my head above water, here are a couple tips I like to follow!

Busy week tips –

1) Stay Organized – During the busiest of your weeks it is so hard to keep track of everything and the worst thing would be to allow something to fall through the cracks. I would highly recommend a planner! I know some people are more on top of their game and use an electronic calendar but I like to keep it a little more old school, paper planner for the win. This allows me to stay on top of all my assignments and *hopefully* never miss a due date.

2) Prioritize – I think one of the hardest things to do when you are extremely busy is to realize that maybe not everything will get done or get done with the quality of work you normally do. While it isn’t ideal to hand in less than fantastic work, sometimes it is absolutely necessary. In order to know what to focus on and how to allocate your time wisely, I always make a list of priorities. This allows me to quickly scan and know what is first to get done and what is last to be done. This way you are more efficiently working and if all goes well and time is allocated correctly, everything will get done!

3) Quality of study time > Quantity of study time – It may seem like it is necessary to devote hours and hours to studying, but in my opinion it is not the total hours you spent studying but rather the quality of the time you put into studying. After a couple hours of studying where you are focused and working hard will always beat a day of studying with frequent computer/snacking breaks (my favorite kind of break). If you study hard and really devote yourself to an exam, the results will probably beat days of mediocre studying.

4) Rid yourself of distractions – I cannot study at my apartment, it will just not get done. There are too many distractions from the TV, to the kitchen, to the possibility of taking a nap…it is just a complete fail. I also think a library is just way too quiet and serious (though it is better than trying to study in my room), the best place to study for me is a coffee shop. The perfect mix of a relaxing environment but not relaxing enough that you want to take a nap. For the last couple exams/quizzes I have gone to various coffee shops and managed to get some good quality studying in. There is also the added perk of delicious coffee which can really help the studying process (I highly recommend Stauf’s and Luck Bros‘ in Grandview!)

5) Sleep – I know everyone always tells you to get a good night’s sleep but it actually does help. You wake up in the morning feeling refreshed and ready to go instead of waking up dreading getting out of your bed. Before I go to sleep I like to review my notes once more and then put it out of my mind. It doesn’t help to dwell on journal entries while trying to fall asleep, put the textbooks down and relax…it will all be okay!

So these are just a few things that help me stay sane during a crazy week. The nice thing is that everyone is going through it together so you always have a friend to commiserate with. One good thing about a busy week is the following weekend, that is always the light at the end of the tunnel!

 


Leadership Lessons

All first year students take a leadership course during their fall semester, which is taught by Dr. Tony Rucci. In this class, each team of five students is required to do a community service project and write a reflection paper about their experience.  My team chose to participate in Meals On Wheels.  Meals On Wheels is a program where volunteers deliver food to the homes of those who cannot afford to buy food, and who are either partially or completely house-bound.

My team of five was assigned to two delivery routes and given instructions on where and how to deliver the meals.  Some deliveries required signatures, and others did not.  Hot meals and cold meals were sealed inside individual trays, and hot meals came with a slice of bread and an apple.  Drink choices were skim or 2% milk.

I was prepared for the poverty we saw – probably better prepared than my teammates.  I grew up in a town where poverty is normative, and I was a volunteer tutor in an inner-city school while I was an undergrad.  I’ve seen hunger on children’s faces – in the ways they act and react – because I’ve studied next to and taught these children.  I was also prepared for the dirt and decay we encountered in some homes because I worked for a cleaning company in the summers.

But what I was not prepared for was the complete and total isolation we encountered.  Most of the people we brought meals to were elderly, and many were handicapped.  I wondered where their children were – their grandchildren.  I wondered it for at least the first hour.  That’s how long it took me to realize that they probably didn’t have children.  Or their children were dead.  Or lived in another state and couldn’t afford to visit often or financially support their aging parents.  And if you or your children can’t afford to hire an in-home nurse or move into assisted living or a nursing home, there isn’t much choice.  You’re stuck.

I was also unprepared for how little food we actually delivered. I greatly respect what Meals On Wheels does, and I think it’s a wonderful program.  I fully realize the funding and man-power limitations they face on a daily basis.  I also understand that, as an Italian, my beliefs in portion size are dramatically skewed.  But despite all of these things, the bottom line is that we only delivered one meal to each person.  One meal per person.  One meal per day.

Think about how much you eat in one day.

 

Our route took my team two hours to complete, from start to finish.  Two hours and we got to go home to full cupboards, clean floors, and air conditioning.  Two hours and we were back to being students, with all the academic, intellectual, social, and economic privileges that students have.

After an experience like that, you have to ask yourself what you’re doing with your life.  How are you helping anyone besides yourself?  And maybe you aren’t.  Maybe you’re just trying to survive grad school.  And maybe that’s the point.

Our leadership project was a good way for us to give back, to remind us of what is important, and to remember that despite the lengthy class discussions about profit margins, supply and demand curves, and increasing shareholders equity, money isn’t everything.  It isn’t even close.

 


New environment, new challenge

It has been two weeks since I started my new journey. I am here to pursue my master degree, business logistics engineering. Fisher is a  totally environment for my classmates and me. We have a relatively busy schedule, which is at least two courses a day, various seminar and info session to attend. What is more important, everyone has to face the stress from both homework and job hunting.

Strategy Logistics Management impresses me most. We just have attended the class twice. We are lucky enough to have two guest speakers, one from Verizon and another from Walmart. Most of my classmate are Chinese student just graduating from university without working experiences, so the first people cannot be engaged. Fortunately, this week we had a presentation from International Logistics Department of Walmart. We all know Walmart more or less, so the atmosphere is amazing, most of my classmate put forward their questions, ranging from corporation strategy to shopping experiences. Both the guest speaker and we enjoyed a lot. One more thing, to our great surprise, we had to take a quiz at the time we just attended the class only one time. We are still not used to this kind of rhythm, which forces us to read the textbook and supplemental materials.


First month at Fisher SMF!

I have realized two most important things in my first month at Fisher SMF program. One, the breadth of resources and two, to succeed here you need to prioritize!

Once you are admitted to Fisher SMF, even before the program begins, the Fisher Career Management Office (CMO) starts communicating with you to offer you personalized career search services. From how to network in US (especially for international students) to how to dress formally (important for all the female students) and how it is different from business casual to how to brand yourself, everything is personalized. In my previous academic life (trust me, it’s a long one) I have never come across such a depth and breadth of services/ resources offered.

And CMO is just one office there are many such offices and organizations here which offer ample professional and social development opportunities. When there are so many opportunities around its very important for us, as students as to how to allocate our time. For example as an international student I had to take English as a Second Language (ESL) test and it had some conflicts with my finance classes. After discussing this issue with SMF program director Professor Pinteris and advisor Jennifer Bennett, they helped me reschedule it for the next semester, which was such a relief for me. I would have missed a very interesting class. So in a nutshell, if you know what you want, Fisher SMF gives you ample opportunities to explore your path!


Jessica Reynolds, MBA

I GRADUATED!

This past weekend was such a mix of emotions, family, friends, graduation celebrations — and lots of food and good times. Maybe a little bit too much food and good times, but hey, it was graduation!

Reynolds  family at graduation!

Reynolds family at graduation!

On Saturday, May 3rd, the Fisher College of Business held its “hooding ceremony” for all graduates. It was a great ceremony, and perfect for family, friends and loved ones to attend. The hooding ceremony (or pre-commencement) occurred at Mershon Auditorium, and is the first step of graduation weekend. All Fisher master students are encouraged to attend the intimate ceremony, and it’s a great opportunity for pictures. What can I say? I am a sucker for capturing all of the great memories. :)

As an undergraduate of OSU, I attended the big graduation in The ‘Shoe. Because the school was still on quarters, I graduated in the month of June. Personally, I thought it was HOT and LONG. However, it is a cool experience for those that have never attended – and now graduation is in May, so it is significantly cooler. If you chose not to attend the OSU graduation on Sunday, you can pick up your diploma the following week.

jr and kn - hugging - complressed

One of my best MBA buddies – Kelly!

For the Fisher pre-commencement/hooding ceremony, a few speeches were given, and then graduates for each program were called by name. You walk across the stage and a professor puts the Masters’ hood around you neck. Lucky for business students, it’s the beautiful color of drab (we all know it wasn’t a marketer that came up with THAT name!). At the end they play a slideshow (only part where I got slightly choked-up), and a brief reception is held after. It was a great time, and I was very happy that my parents and best friend were able to attend.

Me and the beautiful Melissa!

Me and the beautiful Melissa!

So, I am closing the MBA chapter of my life, and starting my journey as a young professional. I will begin my career at Alliance Data in a few months, and can’t wait to see what happens next. Entering this program was one of the best decisions I have ever made – and the laughs, tears, struggles and TONS of learning were absolutely worth it. I know that I am going to miss my business school friends that are moving across the country like crazy, but am so proud of my entire class and all our accomplishments. And, this means I have lots of people to visit!

I have made best friend, found mentors and created relationships that will last forever. None of this would have been possible without the support of my family, friends, everyone in the GPO and the Office of Career Management — and for that, I am extremely grateful.


Still feels a little weird to consider myself a Master of Business – but hey, that’s what my degree says. :)


MAcc Scrapbook

How the time has flown! I have gone from being a prospective MAcc student reading the My Fisher Grad Life Blog and wondering why some authors didn’t post more, to being a soon-to-be graduate who is impressed they posted so much! The past nine months have been the most intense period of self-growth and change I have ever experienced in my life. I met so many amazing people and was exposed to different perspectives on life and business. I know I will walk into my first full time job as a finance auditor at the Auditor of State’s office better prepared to be a successful professional thanks to my time at Fisher.

Here is a small sample of some of the things I was doing over the past year while I was too busy to blog:

50 Yard Line

Standing on the football field during Orientation

Class

Inside Arya’s Management and Control class

Corn maze

Heading into the corn maze at Circle S Farms

Picking pumpkins

Picking pumpkins!

Thao

I managed to get out and see Thao and the Get Down Stay Down and Neko Case at the Newport, a concert venue on High St. across from campus

Neko

Neko Case

Foxy!

Me and my boyfriend Brent all dressed up and ready to go to the Fisher Grad Student Halloween party

Fraud: never worth it

Aaron Beam talks about drugs, SEC and rock and roll during his MAcc talk

Held at the Faculty Club

The Class of 14 at the MAcc winter dinner

Christmas in bloom

A winter break girls day out to the Franklin Park Conservatory. Left to right: Liana, Lina, Dongqi, Yeajung and me

Our professor then hosted the speaker at his house

Barry Hoffman speaks to our Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions class about the Valassis-ADVO merger

Book your group ahead of time!

A bunch of hungry MAcc student getting pizza after hunting for a place to play lazer tag

The food was delicious!

I didn’t get pictures at the FISA’s Holi dinner so I snapped a selfie with my friend Ping before our Advanced Negotiations class

Tip: Place your napkin on your lap immediately when you sit down

My table at the MHRM etiquette dinner

The last ever MAcc talk, given by OSU's own Dr. Zhang on accounting research (my camera created the rainbow effect)

The last ever MAcc talk, given by OSU’s own Dr. Zhang on accounting research (my camera created the rainbow effect)

Group photo of MAcc students and alumni who participated in the spring MAcc gives back event. I helped organize the Dress for Success store in the Short North

Group photo of MAcc students and alumni who participated in the spring MAcc gives back event. I helped organize the Dress for Success store in the Short North

Also: travelling to Africa alone, working with Steve Jobs and her non-profit Free the Tampons

Nancy Kramer of Resource Marketing speaks to our Advanced Leadership class about her leadership legacy

AKA Grad School Prom

Action shot of the Fisher Formal

Me and my boyfriend Brent dressed up at the Fisher Formal

Me and my boyfriend Brent dressed up at the Fisher Formal

My friend Lina and I at the Formal

My friend Lina and I at the Formal

He plays the best music before class!

My last ever class- Dr. Mittendorf’s Non-Profit and Governmental Accounting course.


Learning From A Patagonia Executive

Two days ago I sat in one of the most impressive patagoniapresentations I have witnessed during my time here at Fisher. I was able to learn the story of success and failures of a popular American outdoor brand, Patagonia.

Vincent Stanley, the “chief story teller” for Patagonia discussed his 41 year career with the company and how he helped in growing the brand to what it is today.

I was impressed most of all with his humility and passion for profitable sustainability. He spoke of lessons he learned during failures and successes within his tenure at the company. He noted that he nearly bankrupted the company of number of times, but was fortunate that the company’s culture pulled them through tough times.

Stanley highlighted the fact that the hiring process is crucial to the company’s success. The company makes sure that new employees understand the importance of being profitable, yet sustainable. The products that Patagonia manufacture and sell to the public are high quality and priced at a premium, because the company believes in minimal waste. The hope is that customers will use the clothing for 5-10 years and then return the product to be recycled into a new article to be sold as a different product. Stanley noted that the company believes firmly in cradle to cradle sustainability.

I enjoyed not only the stories of the success, but the on-boarding steps taken to increase morale and productivity. Patagonia makes sure its employees are passionate about the outdoors. Many employees participate in a 2 month internship with a NGO. During this experience the company provides the employee with full compensation as if they were working at corporate.

It is no surprise that a company focused on selling outdoor products invests so much time, resources, and money into keeping the outdoors sustainable and beautiful. My hat’s off to this company and its impressive leadership team full of people like Vincent Stanley.

 

 

 

 


CEO of LifeCare Alliance Visits Fisher

Chuck Gehring is passionate about his job and his company’s mission. His passion is evident in the way he talks about his company and the role he plays in leading such an organization.Chuck-Gehring-1807381 220 Having him come and speak was a special treat for students in the Leadership Legacy course.

Chuck’s organization, LifeCare Alliance, is a nonprofit that focuses on helping communities by identifying and delivering health and nutrition services to those in need. A few of the well known programs include Meals-On-Wheels, Columbus Cancer Clinic, IMPACT Safety, and many others.

Having Chuck in the classroom allowed students to ask questions and learn more about his career path and leadership style. Chuck was enthusiastic about the opportunities that recently minted MBAs have in the nonprofit sector. He stated that many nonprofits could benefit from having younger business leaders included in the board room in order to assist in  connecting with younger generations.

Chuck’s career path has been anything but traditional. He started his career with Anheusser Busch before moving on to Sanese Services. From there, Chuck moved into nonprofit and has enjoyed being in this sector.

His take on leadership was inspiring. He noted the importance of doing the right thing, not only for yourself and your company, but for the community in which one resides. It is obvious that Chuck has a great focus on making his organization successful and doing so in an ethical and professional manner. I was struck by one comment he made about his struggle sleeping at night if he feels like the company fell short in one area or another. He truly believes in creating sustainable change for the community by providing wonderful health and nutrition services to those in need.


Innovation Israel Pre-Trek Meeting

Visiting Israel has been a lifelong dream of mine for quite some time. Because of this, you can imagine how excited I was to learn that Fisher was planning on offering a course this year that included a visit to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Of course, I signed up for the class.blog_telaviv

The class is centered around the economy and entrepreneurial spirit of Israel, specifically in Tel Aviv. Our instructor for the course was born and raised in Israel and has an incredible background in business and international consulting. As a student, I have really enjoyed learning about the Israeli economy and culture.

One way in which I was able to learn more about the culture was to attend a social gathering at the home of David and Bonnie Milenthal. The CEO and founder of Israel and Company attended the event, along with representatives of the Columbus Jewish Federation. We learned of their experiences and connections in Israel and had the chance to speak with them in a nice setting that allowed for a lot of learning to take place.

While in Israel, my class will visit various companies and organizations, ranging from global Fortune 500 firms to technology startups. Along with visiting businesses, the trip will include a visit to Jerusalem to see and learn more about the historic Israeli culture. I couldn’t be more excited for this amazing opportunity.


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