Posts filed under 'Class'

Looking Back and Looking Forward

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I am a second year full time MBA student and am set to graduate in about a month.  There is a mix of reflection and excitement (even more so from my wife who has endured having her spouse in a full time graduate program).

The Past

When reflecting on the past two years and what I’ve gained from them, I’ve thought of the relationships I’ve made and how walking out of this experience confirmed the things that brought me here in the first place.  When talking about Fisher, we talk a lot about the small class size being a key component of the overall experience.  The small class size lends itself to more intimate settings which, in turn, lend itself to more opportunities to connect with classmates, faculty and career management.  This all made logical sense, but I’ve been able to now have the experience of living it out and I can say it’s all true.  Friendships-I have been able to get to know several classmates in a deep way over this relatively short period of time, and I fully expect to continue those relationships even after the program is finished. Professors-even having gone to Ohio State for undergrad, I’ve seen a world of difference in the depth of relationships I have with my professors at Fisher.  Most of them are in the Ops/Logistics field (my focus in the program) and I have been able to cultivate these relationships and to lean on them for better understanding a concept and also for career advice.

Another area that sticks out to me is the Corporate Mentor Program.  As a student, you fill out an “application.”  It’s more of an info sheet on what you’re looking for in a mentor, and they pair you with an executive in the Columbus area.  The program is only supposed to last for a year, but often the relationships extend for more, and that was the case for me.  My mentor has been a great source of advice and has graciously connected me to others in the supply chain profession.

The FutureFuture path

Looking now to the future.  Currently, I am searching for a supply chain position in the Columbus area, but am hopeful that something will come through soon.  Coming to an MBA program is somewhat of a gamble, albeit a calculated and relatively low risk gamble (92% of graduates last year had jobs within 3 months of graduation).  You’re essentially putting all of your chips in and hoping the investment pays off.  Thankfully it almost always does, but at certain times tries your resolve.  I’ve found in those times it’s been helpful to focus on the good things in your life and to know that life is more than just what job you have.  For example, my wife and I just welcomed our daughter to the world a couple weeks ago (see picture below).  What a blessing!


The MBA program has been a great re-calibration experience for my career and I’m looking forward to a brighter future than when I entered.

No Diggity, No Doubt

Three fantastic things have happened this semester.

1. I correctly predicted how long it would be for me to write another Fisher Grad Life blog post.

I was definitely right when I insinuated this semester was going to keep me busy. The best part? I have enjoyed the chaos. The classes have been interesting and filled with invaluable content – most of which is almost immediately applicable to a Human Resource Professional’s current job or internship.

2. I have gotten to know my classmates better (which is a HUGE feat when you have an *almost* three year old).

One of the best pieces of advice I can give to incoming business students (MHRM or other), take the time to get to know your classmates. Sure, networking with them is great. But more importantly, establishing real connections with people in the same boat as you will offer you lasting support and friendships. Whether you go to Thirsty Scholar at the completion of the week, or you sit by the same people in every class, GET TO KNOW YOUR PEERS. This will define your experience at Fisher almost more than anything else.


3. I HAVE AN INTERNSHIP (and, consequently, I found a fantastic daycare for my kid). Saying I’m “excited” to start my internship is an understatement. The projects, the brand, and the people I’ll be working with make me beyond excited to begin. I can’t wait to fill you in when I get back.



This entire post is dedicated to one class, because it is just that awesome. As an SMF, you have the opportunity to take classes outside of Finance. Negotiations is one of them. Take it. Absolutely, under any circumstances, sign up for this. It is taught by either Professor Lount of Professor Lewicki. I currently have the night class with Dr. Lewicki. I could go on and on about Dr. Lewicki’s achievements in the field of negotiations, but I will stick to the class.

I hate night classes. Simply put. There are hundreds of things I would rather be doing at the end of March from 6-9 at night and I am sure most of you feel the same way. Negotiations happens to fall in this category of things I would rather be doing. This is one of the two most engaging classes I have had at Fisher (Dr. Wruck’s Corporate 3&4 are the others). Almost every night you are participating in some sort of negotiation. You have free reign to stretch the truth, never reach a deal, anything. The thrill of winning a negotiation, even with fake money, is something that is hard to compare with. This class also gives you the opportunity to work with Working Professional MBA’s, Full-Time MBA’s, JDMBA and MHRM students. With this in mind, you know you will never be negotiating with someone of the same background or goals.

I will warn you. You might look up after laughing, cheating, and lying in your negotiation to the point where you will enjoy it so much, that you actually might be a little depressed that you have to leave for the night. The 3 hours in negotiations passes by entirely too quickly, to say the least.

Team Projects

One of the great features of the SMF program is an action-based course in the last academic term. Students have a number of projects from which to choose, from investment management to corporate finance to risk management, and students rank all the projects. Professor Pinteris then assigns people to groups based on their specializations, previous coursework, grades, and other factors. I was assigned to be team leader for a corporate finance project with Ohio State’s Treasury Office. My team and I are working with the office to model operating cash flows based on historical data, determine how much cash the university needs to keep in interest-bearing deposits, and addressing a number of pending considerations for Treasury.

The people with whom we are liaising on this project told us that they would like a candid assessment of Treasury’s results, so this project is already testing my knowledge of government and non-profit accounting. Plus the project is very relevant to the job that I took in public finance, so I’m really getting a great transition from school to the workplace.

Q&A with a MHRM Student: Bagyasri H.

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Bagyasri Hari – MHRM Class of 2016

Hometown: Bangalore, India

Undergraduate Major: Business Management

Hobbies and Interests: Sketching/Painting, Anime, Jigsaw Puzzles and Music

What you like most about Columbus: I appreciate that it is a pretty calm and relaxing city with very friendly people.

Favorite things to do in Columbus: I enjoy shopping at the many malls and shopping centers in the area, and am really happy that Columbus has a Godiva store (I love Godiva chocolate!)

What interests you about HR: Human Resource serves as a link between a business idea and its effective implementation. It is a live wire connecting and converting ideas into happenings. I want to be actively involved in attracting and retaining the right talent, as people are the most important asset for any enterprise.

Favorite aspects of being a MHRM student at Fisher: The knowledgeable faculty, class times that allow students to balance a job and school, the atmosphere in class and the curriculum.

What advice would you give incoming first years and/ or prospective students: If you are an international student (on F1 visa), it is important to understand that it can be difficult to find an internship/job in HR as it is not a STEM field, but it is not impossible. So please be mentally prepared to be optimistic and work hard. Use the resources available like the career management office and company information sessions to network.

Asset Misappropriation

Last term I took a class that focused on fraudulent financial reporting.  This course focused on methods to detect whether the financial statements can be analyzed in ways to determine if fraud is being perpetrated by the company.  This would normally involve managers or executives.  This term I am in another fraud class, asset misappropriation.  This course focuses on ways employees one way or another steal assets from the company.  This type of fraud tends to be more common amongst companies but usually results in a smaller amount of loss as compared to fraudulent financial reporting.

In the course we have been learning about different ways employees steal from their company.  Usually it involves employees with trusted responsibilities over some type of asset.  This can range from an employee taking cash out of the register to more elaborate payroll or billing schemes.  While there are way too many different methods for us to cover in 7 weeks, we hit the major and most common approaches used by fraudsters.  As part of the class we also talk about how to prevent or detect these frauds.  This is clearly a very useful skill to acquire when going into a career as an accountant.

I have really enjoyed this class so far.  It is interesting to discuss how creative some of these fraudsters get when perpetrating the crime.  Classes involve a mix of discussion about schemes, cases, and videos featuring real world examples.  I am looking forward to learn about other kinds of fraud schemes as the course continues.


Over the past year and a half, I have had the opportunity to learn from some of the great faculty members that we have here at The Fisher College of Business.  For example, I had the opportunity to take two classes with Rao Unnava, who is one of the co-founders of Angie’s List.  And in another class, I was able to learn from marketing professionals at Resource/Ammirati, a local, but large independent creative agency located here in Columbus.

In this last semester of my MBA education, I have been fortunate enough to take a class on business development, taught by David Clifton—or Clifton as he likes us to call him—Chief Marketing Officer for Huntington Bank.

Clifton started out his career as an engineer, but the creative side of him took hold as he moved into agency life early on in his career after earning his MBA.  He’s worked on major campaigns and projects for companies like Rolls Royce, Steak ‘n Shake, BankOne and Chase.  The list goes on and on.

What is special about having Clifton as a professor is that he understands all of the workings outside of the classroom, so he brings that with him when he lectures.  Last night, in class, he asked us what Huntington should have done after introducing their Fair Play campaign a few years back.  The answer: file for a patent.  But this is just one lesson of what to do in the real world, and he comes with many more practical applications.

I think that Clifton’s going to work during the day and teaching our class at night gives us a more realistic picture of how the marketing world works.  Sure, our marketing faculty has already done a great job of educating us to be future marketing leaders.  And certainly, our internships have given us glimpses of what is on the horizon.  But when you have someone standing at the front of your class—someone who resides in the C-Suite at a major banking institution—the learning is taken to another level.  We don’t just theorize about what to do, we learn about what to actually do.

Coming into business school, I knew that I would be meeting leaders, but never thought I would have the opportunity to learn from a CMO on an every class period basis.  With graduation right around the corner, I am grateful for being able to learn from someone like David Clifton, who brings the world we dream about as future business leaders into the classroom.

The Saga Continues…

Spring Break has finally rolled around! It is 70 and sunny here and I cannot wait to spend half of the week outside 90% of the time. However, just because Spring Break is here, it does not mean that you can slack on your responsibilities. This definitely includes your SMF team project. A few days of your Spring Break should be devoted to working on really diving into your team project and getting a head start.

We have successfully navigated through our initial consultation with the help of Prof. Bob Lane. We determined the scope of our project, the deliverables and the communication we should engage in with our company. It really is a great experience for those who have no work experience, as well as those who have previous work experience and are looking to get back in the work force after graduation.

BUT…To the great news…

I can say with uncertainty now, that these team projects do present you with a gateway to showing your company what you are capable of and can give you the opportunity to interview with your company. I guess Friday I will see if I can continue in the interview process!

Negotiating Fisher MHRM Electives …

One of the Fisher MHRM program requirements for those completing Plan B (internship/tutorial) is the completion of 3 credit hours of electives. The 3 credit hours is usually completed by taking one 3 credit hour class or two 1.5 credit hour classes. Most students select MHR courses or courses within the Fisher College of Business to fulfill this requirement. However, electives can include MHR courses, Independent or Group Study hours, or outside electives in areas related to human resources.

Last session I took BUSMHR 7222: Advanced Leadership (1.5 credit hours). This course explored leadership effectiveness through class readings and discussions about effective leadership; guest speakers who shared their life stories and leadership styles, as well as tips for leading others; and introspection on one’s own leadership style and how one can improve identified areas based on 360 feedback. This course helped make the topic, leadership, much more personal. It encouraged students to reflect on their life stories, values, motivations, self-awareness, and life balance so that they can ultimately identify what they want their Leadership Legacy to be in life. Great class!

This session I am taking BUSMHR 7240: Managerial Negotiations (1.5 credit hours).  The class is focused on exploring different concepts and theories of bargaining and negotiating, as well as the different dynamics that can exist and possible resolutions. The class consists of several in class exercises and activities, which include role playing in different negotiation scenarios. I knew entering the class that at times this is going to challenge me to step outside of my comfort zone, but negotiations take place all the time (i.e. coworkers and peers, employer, significant other, children, businesses, etc.) so the knowledge and skills I will acquire throughout the class are certainly relevant and beneficial, both personally and professionally. So far, so good!

Nonprofit and Governmental Accounting

Our last session, Spring Session 2, is now underway, which means new classes for Fisher MAcc students! A popular elective for students this term is AMIS 7250: Nonprofit and Governmental Accounting, and it’s taught by Prof. Brian Mittendorf. So far in our accounting education, the focus has been on for-profit companies and learning about their financial reporting requirements, auditing, and taxation. Thus, many MAcc students were interested in learning about the nonprofit sector. Also, nonprofit and governmental accounting is 16-24% of the Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR) section of the CPA Exam (it’s on the minds of most MAcc students nowadays as some have begun studying for it).

The course makes you think about accounting in a new light. Not only does the terminology change when you are talking about nonprofits, but the way in which you think about profits and expenses shifts as well. Nonprofits do, in fact, make “profits!” What differentiates them from for-profit companies is that nonprofits don’t have owners or shareholders. The “owner” of the organization is its mission, and all profits are reinvested to carry out that mission.

I really like this elective course so far and am looking forward to see what else we learn. In addition to rounding out my accounting education, I will also be able to apply what we learn in this course as soon I will be volunteering as treasurer for a 501(c)(7) nonprofit and would love to undertake other roles in the nonprofit sector in the future.

We watched the TED talk below for class, which proposes that that the way we evaluate charities (and their spending habits) is flawed. Enjoy!


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