Adjusting to Grad School Life

Like many of my classmates, I started the MAcc program right out of undergrad. For that reason, I was very curious as to how differently grad school would feel. I wasn’t sure how my normal everyday habits would translate at the graduate school level. If you’re not coming right from undergrad, I’m sure you’re asking yourself a similar question!

After the first few weeks, I can tell you that adjusting to the MAcc and life in Columbus has been a breeze! Here are five of my favorite things about the MAcc program and being in grad school here at Ohio State:

The classroom environment

There is such a high level of respect between the professors and students at the graduate level. Our classrooms are more discussion-based and less homework-heavy. The distinguishing factor for me is that the professors care about us fully understanding the material. After all, we are here to deepen our knowledge of accounting—not just get A’s.

The time commitment  

In our classes, the deliverables consist mostly of group projects. In undergrad, I remember meeting with groups as late as 11 p.m. to work on projects. In the MAcc program, I love that we all have very similar class schedules and meet while still on campus during the day. The culture is this way because many students live off-campus. I appreciate this aspect of the MAcc program because I can leave time for other priorities in the evenings!

The subject exposure

One unique component of the MAcc program is the exposure to over 18 courses in only one year! Each course is seven weeks long (aside from a few electives), and the best part is that only four courses are required. That leaves at least 14 courses that you can tailor to your preference to make your MAcc experience truly personalized!

Are seven-week courses stressful? That was a question I asked myself before beginning the program. They are completely manageable! In fact, I love them because I can easily visualize my schedule over the seven-week period and balance school, work, and life!

Living in a metropolitan city

audrey-farmers-marketColumbus offers so much more than what lies on campus. As a grad-student, I love that there are very accessible places to go off campus. Downtown is a quick drive away and so are the Blue Jackets (hockey) and Columbus Crew (soccer) teams. Even closer to campus is Short North - a neighborhood just a few blocks from my apartment that offers dozens of trendy food, drink, fitness, and shopping options! That leads me to my fifth point…

Fitness

Leading a healthy and balanced lifestyle has always been a priority for me. Finding a new workout routine on a new campus was something I was worried about. Luckily, the Fisher College of Business is close to two campus recreation facilities (the RPAC and North Recreation Center) that offer group fitness classes as well as great amenities to students for free!

Another bonus: This semester, the MAcc program created both sand volleyball and soccer co-ed intramural teams. Intramurals are a great way to stay active and get to know students in the MAcc program! Off campus, there are also various options. Most apartment complexes have workout facilities, and I love the group fitness/yoga studios in Short North as well as the surrounding suburbs!

Taiwanese Girl in Columbus

MY FIRST BLOG POST! How exciting!

Hello dear readers, this is Zola speaking.  At the start of my life as a Fisher grad blogger, I would like to introduce myself:

Where do I come from?

There you are- Taiwan!

Taiwan.  A tiny island across the whole Pacific Ocean. On this map, you can get a rough idea of its size and distance. (It took me about 32 hours flying and waiting at airports to get to Columbus!)

Before coming to OSU, I graduated from National Taiwan University with bachelor’s degrees in Finance/Accounting and my one-year internship at KPMG Advisory in June.

Why am I here?

My list of applications for graduate programs abroad was not super long: Three schools. That’s it. And oh you bet The Ohio State University was on the top of it. Not only was I deeply impressed by the “Buckeye Proud” during my school research, the super friendly and helpful Assistant Director of Specialized Graduate Recruiting & Admissions Rebecca Zurek also made me fall in love with the school and the SMF program itself. With enormous help from Rebecca and the Director of Specialized Graduate Recruiting & Admissions Rob Chabot, I was fortunate enough to receive the University Fellowship, which has made my OSU experience even better.

The Oval

How’s it going so far?

Me and Harley-a family member in my homestay

Right after my flight landed in Columbus, I lived with a temporary homestay arranged by International Friendships, Inc (IFI). The host, Janet, and her family welcomed me with open arms, allowing me to adapt to my new life in the U.S. with absolute ease. I really couldn’t appreciate their kindness more. I strongly recommend applying for a short-term homestay through IFI to any international student who wishes to make local friends and experience American culture before school starts!

Now, I have been through the preterm courses in August led by the SMF program director Professor George Pinteris, which is basically Finance 101 for the SMF program and I personally consider a solid start of the program.

Sneak peek of my next episode

Mirror Lake before sunrise

Just one month into the new semester, I’ve already started to know my way around the SMF program, the OSU campus and Columbus itself. I will be sharing something fun about my classes, my dorm, my food and… just MY LIFE in general. Hope that’s spicy enough.:) Don’t change the channel!

What Has Impressed Us? Let’s Hear From International Students!

On the morning of August 4, 2018, I jumped into a host’s car to start my journey in Columbus. With jazz music playing on the radio, I was attracted to what I call “new antique-style” buildings—those with a rusty, red-brick color. A short time later I asked my host, “When will we arrive at the Ohio State campus?” She responded, “Oh, we’re already here.” We had already been driving around campus for a number of minutes! I was impressed by the expansive campus, specifically because university campuses in my country are much, much smaller. I could not believe that I was joining a campus 238 times larger than my former one!

My name is Ting Fan Chang, and I am from Taiwan. I previously studied Public Health at Taipei Medical University, and I am currently pursuing an MBA degree at the Fisher College of Business. Fisher definitely delivers when it comes to resource availability. Specifically, I have only been here for six weeks and I have already attended several key events, such as the Fisher Fall Career Fair, the Fisher Graduate Student Career Fair, a variety of company information sessions, and many others. Fisher students have many opportunities to build connections with company recruiters and gain detailed information on full-time job and internship opportunities. More importantly, at Fisher, students are able to utilize the Office of Career Management for insightful, one-on-one sessions with the Office’s many career consultants. The OCM team gives customized advice corresponding to each student’s particular background and interests.

To gain some other perspectives, I interviewed other first-year international students at Fisher to learn about their stories, and what they’ve experienced in the last couple months at Fisher, OSU, and throughout Columbus. Here is what they had to say:

Sai Chandra Pujita Vazrala — Guntur, India

Q: What is your impression of the Fisher MBA classroom setting?

A: Fisher MBA classrooms are interactive and relaxed – different from the more formal setting back in my home country. Students are encouraged to contribute to discussions and meaningfully challenge each other’s viewpoints. Overall, an engaging and dynamic classroom environment!

Q: What is your favorite aspect of being a part of the Fisher MBA program?

A: I truly believe that the biggest advantage of being a part of the Fisher MBA program is its diversity! We are exposed to a great blend of not only cultural diversity, but also professional diversity, in an intimate setting. I hope to learn more about the intricacies of what makes us the professionals and individuals that we are, while building a lasting network for years to come!


Fahd Jehangir Lahore, Pakistan

Q: What do you think is the biggest advantage of the Fisher MBA program?

A: The faculty and Office of Career Management staff are extremely approachable, helpful and dedicated. You feel lucky to be part of the FTMBA batch by the sheer level of resources dedicated to your success.

Q: What do people do for fun in Columbus?

A: It all depends on what you want to do. If you’re a sports lover, it takes almost no time to plan a pickup game of soccer, basketball, volleyball, what have you, within the class. If you’re interested in nightlife, there are tons of domestic students who will not only guide you to the best spots in town, but also invite you to join in!

Q: What is your most impressive experience since arriving at OSU?

A: Within one month of arriving at OSU, I was hosted by more than five domestic students, and many more international students. I’ve made many new friends and gotten to know almost everyone in my MBA class. Yet everyday someone’s new experiences are shared in class. The level of diversity and intellect accumulated within the MBA group is fascinating!


Chih Chien (Jeff) Chiu Tainan, Taiwan

Q: What is your most impressive experience since arriving at OSU?

A: Comprehensive career services at Fisher amaze me because they personalize their support and allow us to leverage the power of such a large university. Compared to business schools in my home country, Fisher provides more customized career consultants, broad alumni networking, recruiting events, and career workshops. All of these resources along with solid technical training help us effectively stand out among others.


Rattaporn Puikaew Bangkok, Thailand

Q: What do you like to do for fun in Columbus?

A: Classes are wonderful, but we know, spending time outside with super cool, new friends is way more enjoyable! There are copious interesting places to explore near OSU’s campus: cool bars in Short North, the vintage-style book loft in German Village, and many more fun activities always going on. Most importantly, the Buckeye football games are huge! To be honest, the first game of the season was my ‘Football 101’ experience. I’m not a big sports fan, but time will be well spent cheering on the team and watching with friends! (Warning: remember to buy tickets for the whole season – it’s a must!) If you’re not a big sports fan like me, Friday nights with friends are another way to get together and let loose! To me, hanging out with friends is the fastest and easiest way to get to know each other. (Hint: the best moments are ones we all share!)

 

 

My GAP Experience: Italy and Germany

Fisher MBA students often talk about GAP. What exactly is GAP and why is it such a focal point of our program?

Global Applied Projects (GAP) is an opportunity for MBA students to gain international consulting experience by working on a business challenge in a global location (non-US). It is a three-credit, graded, elective course that allows students to lead, plan, and execute global consulting engagements across multiple functional areas for a wide variety of corporations, not-for-profits, and governments in locations outside of the US. A typical GAP project timeline looks like this:

January: Project client and Office of Global Business work to define the business problem and formulate a high-level scope.

Late February: Student participation begins with the section of MBA team members chosen to meet the needs of the project.

Next 10 weeks: Team is directed by a second-year MBA team coach and a faculty functional expert. Students attend weekly classes that teach best practices in project management and global consulting, and develop cultural awareness. They also meet regularly with teams, advisors, coaches, and clients, and submit class assignments that support the development and execution of the projects.

May: Three-week, in-country, primary research phase with a presentation of findings, an in-depth analysis, and specific, actionable recommendations to the client.

As a second-year MBA student, I would love to share with you my most recent GAP experience, where I had the opportunity to work with Technical Rubber Company, based in Johnstown, OH, as well as Salvadori, based in Rovereto, Italy. 

 

 

Client: Technical Rubber Company

Team members: Luke Barousse, Abhishek Chakrabarti, Adam Kanter, Andris Koh, Vaibhav Meharwade, Carl Shapiro, Sangyoun Shin, Kristen Stubbs

Cities/Countries we visited: Rovereto, Italy, and Munich, Germany

Activities: Visited TRC’s corporate headquarters, Salvadori’s headquarters, as well as attended the World’s Leading Trade Fair for Water, Sewage, Waste and Raw Materials Management.

At the World’s Leading Trade Fair for Water, Sewage, Waste and Raw Materials Management
World’s Largest Tire at Salvadori’s Headquarters

 

Project Title: Rubber Molded Products Business Plan

Objective: To define a pathway for TRC to forward integrate from the equipment business to manufacturing and selling products made from recycled rubber.

Submitted Deliverables: A 100-page business plan that contained our industry analysis, strategic recommendations, as well as financial, operational, and marketing plans. We also delivered a final presentation to TRC’s and Salvadori’s executives.

What were some takeaways from this GAP experience?

1. Even though I had no experience in the manufacturing or recycled rubber industry, I was extremely fascinated by it. By keeping an open mind, as well as the willingness to learn, changed my perspective of recycled rubber and the manufacturing industry.

An espresso vending machine

2. Italians absolutely love good food, wine, and espresso.

Best pasta ever had

3. Working in a team of eight within close parameters is not easy. There were many memorable moments, but there were also moments of tension. It is important to talk through these issues, instead of letting emotions breed over time.

4. Take some down time for yourself. I decided to stroll along the river one evening in Rovereto, where I enjoyed the perfect sunset with a glass of wine.

Rovereto, Italy

5. Communication is key. One of our team members was unable to travel internationally, so we had to find a way to deal with different time zones, interact and engage with our teammate, as well as communicate in a way that made him feel as part of the team even though we were not physically together.

6. Take time on the weekends to explore nearby cities, take a break from work, and enjoy the beautiful scenery. I visited Rome, Venice, and spent the last weekend in Munich visiting the Neuschwanstein castle.

Rome
Venice
Munich

7. Rely on each other’s strengths to get things done efficiently. For example, when we were working on the business plan, we had Carl work on designing our logos, Sangyoun/myself on market research, Adam/Abhi on financials, Luke/Vaibhav on technical viability, and Kristen in putting things together. We each had our own strengths and we used them to maximize our output.

8. Having the opportunity to work as a consultant for a global client is something really unique and special. I know that having these relationships with clients and colleagues will carry into the future as I embark on more global projects in my career.

Original Hofbrauhaus
Our Team!
Pork knuckle, anyone?

 

 

Organization Design Strategies: A Look at the Global One Health Initiative GAP Project in Ethiopia and Kenya

Rolling out of bed after finals week at the end of our second semester in the MBA program, it was both exciting and nerve-racking to be packing for a three-week trip for Ethiopia and Kenya. After making it through final group projects and coursework, I kept wondering if I was truly prepared for our in-country portion of the GAP global consulting project. On May 4, 2018, most of the members of my GAP team met at the Columbus airport for our journey to Addis Ababa. We were headed to our client’s regional office that was recently opened at the end of 2017. Our client, GOHi, is an NGO based at The Ohio State University focused on education, research, training and outreach programs to build capacity toward a global One Health approach.

My amazing GAP team!

Before leaving for Ethiopia, our team of seven MBA students met with GOHi several times to work through project objectives and develop a plan of action during the in-country experience. We were working toward developing recommendations for their organization structure and a list of potential partners for GOHi to establish a sustainable presence in the region. The months leading up to the trip, we identified organizations with similar missions to connect with in-country and learn more about their strategy and operations on the ground. We prepared interview guides, developed spreadsheets, laughed late into the evenings in Gerlach Hall, made nicknames for ourselves and bonded over Graeter’s Ice Cream.

After all this time, May 4th finally came around, and we embarked on our journey. Our team spent the first week in Addis Ababa getting to know the GOHi team and beginning our interviews with similar organizations working in the region. We were able to walk to the office every morning from the hotel where we stayed, passing by the ongoing building construction and liveliness of the capital city. The GOHi staff was extremely welcoming and supportive, inviting us to learn about their daily activities, taking us to a traditional Ethiopian lunch and dinner where we tasted our first authentic injera and later experienced the traditional dance of eskista, and allowing us to observe project sites and learn more about the on-the-ground project work taking place.

We met with organizations like Amref Health Africa, PSI Ethiopia and the Ethiopian branch of the CDC. We learned about the importance of maintaining relationships with government entities to gain support for organization success, we identified potential partnership opportunities and recommendations for increased visibility and flexibility in organization structure. 

Meeting with GOHi team and PSI Ethiopia

After our week in Addis Ababa, we traveled to Kenya to further our research with organizations based in Nairobi. There, we met with and learned from organizations like the International Livestock Research Institute, World Animal Protection and the University of Nairobi. Although most of our time was spent in meetings, we had time for a quick weekend safari to Maasai Mara as well!

After a week in Nairobi, we flew back to Addis to bring together our final report and presentation to the GOHi team. Throughout the entire project, we had established a strong group dynamic that enabled a strong final product for the client, one that they are still using today! Although a short trip, I found this to be an amazing experience, full of learning, the chance to build new relationships and the opportunity to consult for an organization working toward an important mission.

Beautiful sunrise on our last day in Addis!

A huge shout out here to my amazing Fisher MBA GAP team: Aziza Allen, Ariel Cooper, John Cox, Kaitlyn Kendall-Sperry and Obi Nnebedum

And to the GOHi staff and leadership team: Wondwossen Gebreyes, Emia Oppenheim, Ashley Bersani, Getnet Yimer, Kassahun Asmare, Tigist Endashaw, Tewodros Abebe and Joshua Amimo

Dear Class of 2020,

Before I get into the heart of this post, I want to apologize to my readers who may have been wondering where I’ve been for the past few months. The answer is all over the place! My spring semester was pretty crazy, so here’s a very quick summary of what I’ve been up to:

Traveling

Between the fact that my family all lives in New York, and I generally love to travel, it seems as if I was barely in Columbus last semester! In March alone, I spent a weekend in Philadelphia for the Cornell Alumni Leadership Conference, a weekend in Boston for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, a weekend in Lexington, Kentucky to visit some famous thoroughbreds (like Triple Crown winner American Pharoah), and a week in Singapore as part of Fisher’s Global Business Expeditions program. Finally, I spent a fantastic three weeks in Ethiopia and Kenya with six of my classmates as part of the Global Applied Projects program. I will dedicate a later post to my GAP experience (I would HIGHLY recommend it if your internship allows), but for now here’s a sneak peak of how we spent some of our free time in Kenya:

Internship hunting

I’m not going to lie to you: my internship search was incredibly long and painful. I watched and celebrated as classmates landed great offers, while I continued to scramble even as I headed off on my GAP trip. In the end, I got a fantastic offer from Boehringer Ingelheim, a large pharmaceutical company, to join the Equine Marketing team in Duluth, GA for the summer. As a horse lover, working in the equine industry is my dream, so I could not be more excited. I will dedicate another post to my internship search process. Shout out to Allison Jones from the Office of Career Management for the incredible support I received throughout my search!

Classes

If you think that your Fall semester classes are rough, I am sorry to say that you’re in for a rude awakening. The group projects that come with the first half of the spring semester will hit you like a ton of bricks. I ended up enrolling in 18 credits this semester (including the GBE and GAP), and it is not something I plan to do ever again. Between my classes, internship search, and travels, I didn’t have much time left to breathe!

Student Orgs

One exciting thing that happens in the Spring Semester is student org elections. As the second years depart, it is up to them to figure out who should take over club leadership for the coming year. I was chosen as the VP of Communication for the Fisher Sports Business Association and the VP of Major Events for the Association of Marketing Professionals. I am excited to work with the rest of the team that was chosen by both clubs and can’t wait to meet our new members!

As I begin my summer internship, I  have been thinking a lot about the Class of 2020, who will arrive on campus in a few short months. There are so many things that I wish I had known before the first day of Pre-Term, and many things I heard as a first year from the Class of 2018 that I know my class is going to repeat. So, without further ado, here are a couple of things you might hear from the second years and during your first year of business school and how to handle them:

“Grades don’t matter.”

If like me, you’re not that far out of school, this will be a hard one to swallow. After all, everyone is expected to maintain a certain GPA to remain in the program, besides the fact that certain companies will ask for your GPA when applying to internships or jobs. On the other hand, as long as you put in the work, you will be successful in class, so it’s not something you should be stressed out about either. I’ve learned more from my experiences outside the classroom than I have in it. The courses set a great foundation of the underlying business knowledge you will need to navigate the business world, but the networking events, conferences, and company visits I attended during my first year provided valuable experiential learning that shaped my decisions as I chose electives and searched for an internship. In short, classes are important, but they aren’t something to be stressed over. Don’t pass up an opportunity to network with representatives from a company you are passionate about or even spend some time learning about your classmates because you’re panicking about the exam you have next week – opportunities abound at Fisher and the larger Ohio State community, and this is your time to take advantage of them!

“My core team was incredible” or “My core team was the worst.”

Team 12 bonding during pre-term

The core team experience, whether it works out for you or not, is an essential part of your first year. You will probably go in with certain expectations, colored by testimonials from previous students about their own experiences. After the first few weeks of classes, you will find yourself either hearing from other students about how much they love their core team and wondering why you don’t feel the same way, or listening to the gripes of those who are having some challenges with their team and feeling fortunate that you can’t relate. The best way to handle the core team experience is to go in with an open mind and be prepared to learn a lot about yourself and how you work with others. You will likely spend the rest of your career working in teams, so your core team will help you figure out what kind of team member you are and leave you better prepared to work with groups in the future, regardless of whether you become best friends or go your separate ways when the year is over.

“Your class doesn’t seem as interested in going to events as ours was”

Here’s the thing that second-year students tend to forget: the first year is HARD. You have little say over your schedule, tons of group projects and assignments to work on, and are navigating the internship search, leaving virtually no breathing room for anything extra. The second years have it relatively easy in comparison, with full control over their schedules and many returning from their summer internships with job offers already in hand. The issue of low attendance at events is typically brought up by the second year students who took the time to plan them. After all, what’s the point of hosting a cool event if no one wants to come? Do the second years and yourselves a favor by attending all the events you can. The student organizations put a lot of time and effort into making sure there is always something happening at Fisher, and there were few events I went to in the first year that I felt weren’t worth attending. In fact, I found myself wishing that so many people hadn’t missed out. Don’t let anyone feel like your class is the only one resistant to attending events – every single class experiences similar struggles in the first year. Make sure you’re one of the students that makes time in their busy schedule for events. 😉

Good luck, Class of 2020, and to all future incoming first-year FTMBAs!

A Classmate’s Top Three Recommendations for You

Recently, fellow MAcc student, Rachel Cox, interviewed me for my thoughts on the MAcc experience. Now, it’s her turn to be “in the hot seat”! Hopefully, she can help you better understand the MAcc Program as well and why you should apply.

Rachel Cox, MAcc program
  1. Where are you from? 
    1. Hayesville, North Carolina. It’s a small town in western North Carolina.
  2. Where did you earn your undergrad degree?
    1. I earned my undergrad at the University of North Carolina (UNC) in Charlotte. I originally picked UNC for its engineering program, and then found myself in an “intro to accounting” class. After this class, I decided to double-major in accounting and finance.
  3. What brought you to Ohio State?
    1. After visiting the university and meeting with the faculty and staff, I knew I wanted to attend the MAcc program at the Fisher College of Business. The program structure is incomparable to other MAcc programs. All MAcc students are only required to take four core classes and the remaining classes are electives. This structure allowed me to take courses outside of accounting with non-MAcc students, which I believe is very beneficial to my learning experience and career. A second main feature that attracted me to Fisher is the University and atmosphere of Columbus, Ohio. Having always lived in North Carolina, I was ready for a change of pace and location. Moving to a new location (and not knowing anyone) has been an enriching process. I have been able to challenge myself academically, while continuing to grow as a person. I have also met amazing friends and peers.
  4. What’s your favorite class in the MAcc program?
    1. My favorite class in the MAcc program was Professional Research in Accounting, taught by Professor Turner. In this class, we conducted research in Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and auditing standards within the PCAOB. This class taught me how to properly research accounting topics and interpret the topics, which is a necessary competency when working in accounting.
  5. What’s your favorite place to be on campus?
    1. My favorite place lately has been the circuit classes in the RPAC or North Rec gym. These classes have an instructor who also plays music in coordination to the workout. This is a nice break from the academic life while staying healthy.
  6. Any recommendations for future students?
    1. Come to the program with an open mind and don’t be afraid to engage in student activities.
    2. Don’t stress over the little mistakes in your classes. Everything will work out in the end.
    3. Take advantage of all the resources on and off campus in Columbus.

I would like to thank Rachel for taking the time to be interviewed and sharing all her insightful experience with us. Making the decision to come to Fisher and join the MAcc program is one of the most important decisions that I have ever made and I am grateful for it. If you have any questions, please feel free to email fcob-fisher_macc@osu.edu to get connected with one of the graduate administrative ambassadors. 

 

Global Business Expedition (GBE) – Spring Break 2018

Everyone loves Spring Break– the perfect week to enjoy right before craziness sets in with projects, exams, and papers due before the academic year ends. Each student’s experience is different. Some students in the MBA program embark on a Global Business Expedition (GBE). GBEs are short-term, high-intensity global programs where students travel on a private tour to visit globally successful, multi-national companies, as well as the must-see historical sites of the region. This year, Singapore and Israel were on the list. I decided to interview two of my classmates, Andrew Page, and Carl Shapiro, who visited Singapore, and Israel, respectively. Continue reading to learn more about their journey and enjoy the beautiful sights!

Andrew Page
First-year Full-Time MBA student with a focus on marketing

  • Why did you choose Singapore for your GBE?

AP: I chose to go to Singapore for several reasons. First, I have never been to Asia and I felt like I would be able to get a great experience with many different cultures in a short amount of time. Secondly, this GBE was focused on experiences with doing business throughout Asia and we had opportunities to meet with companies that had operations in Singapore and throughout Asia.

  • Who else was on this trip with you?

AP: There were 25 other students and two faculty members.

  • What were some memorable experiences that you would like to share?

AP: First: the food! We tried all the great food that Singapore has to offer and although it may seem weird that this is such a memorable experience, it is such a unique part of the culture throughout all of Singapore. Everyone has food recommendations for you whether you ask for them or not.

Another memorable experience was visiting the different culturally-specific areas, for example: Little India, Chinatown, and Arab Street. It felt like we were walking into a different country when we went into these areas, but at the same time the cultures were so integrated with each other. There were Chinese jewelers selling to Indian customers in Little India and an Indian clothing shop owner selling Islamic clothing on Arab Street. It was just so unique to see these cultures intertwine.

Finally, I was able to interact with a lot of people with whom I have not had time to spend before. Out of our group, the majority were in the Working Professionals MBA program, so I was able to speak with them about their experiences and make some great network connections. I was also able to spend a lot of time with our faculty member and get to know him outside of the classroom setting.

  • Was there anything that you did not expect or would have done differently?

AP: I did not expect the opportunities that were available to us as students in that part of the world. There were many instances where we were able to make connections for future opportunities with the companies we were meeting.

  • Would you recommend others to join the GBE next year? 

AP: I would recommend GBE to every student who can do it, and I might try to do it again next year!

Carl Shapiro

First-year Full-Time MBA student with a focus on marketing and brand management

  • Why did you choose Israel for your GBE?

CS: The focus for my career is marketing and brand management which has a strong relationship with the culture in which the brand is doing business. Israel is unique in that the domestic market is too small to support a major company on its own, so as a means for survival, Israeli firms have to export and market themselves in foreign markets. To be on the ground and start to understand the strategies that these firms develop is incredibly powerful.

I also have a personal relationship with Israel, having family there. I am personally invested in the success of the country. I think the unique aspects of Israel– bringing the Hebrew language back to life, establishing the first independent Jewish state in 2000 years, and transforming a desolate environment into fertile land– show what grit and hard work can accomplish.

  • How many students/faculty were on this trip?

CS:  I went to Israel with Oded Shenkar (faculty) and there were nine students on the trip.

  • Any memorable experiences that you would like to share?

CS: Some of my most memorable moments were interacting with Israelis outside of the corporate environment to develop a deeper understanding of their culture. By spending my free time out in Tel Aviv on the beach, or in the markets of Jerusalem, I could really get a feeling of where the entrepreneurship begins and what makes the Israeli condition so relevant to the success of disrupting technology. In the corporate environment, we had the opportunity to talk to the leaders of the businesses we visited, the decision-makers at the highest levels. Because Israel’s culture is so casual, we were encouraged to ask probing questions and get very honest and valuable answers that in the United States might not be possible.

 

  • Was there anything that you did not expect or would have done differently?

CS: I would have liked to have more time for one-on-one networking with some folks from the different companies. Many of the companies we visited introduced us to several high-level managers, but we didn’t have the opportunity to hear them all speak, and it would have been helpful to break out into smaller groups or have unstructured time when we could focus more on the things that interest us with someone from the company who also shares that interest.

  • Would you recommend others to join the GBE next year? 

CS: I absolutely recommend the trip. The reality of the closeness of the Israeli economy with the American economy means that if you work in tech, you will encounter an Israeli firm. It can be an incredible asset to understand the differences and similarities of the two cultures to get the most out of the relationship.

 

Red Carpet Reflections

Little did I expect that Red Carpet this year would be just as an amazing experience as it was last year! This time, from the perspective of a current student and point person to welcome in part of the admitted class, I realized how much fun it is to share about Columbus and the program experience so far. Also, through other current students sharing their stories, I was reminded of many opportunities to experience this amazing city!

During the welcome reception at the Ohio Stadium, we learned a lot about the behind-the-scenes to game day and were reinvigorated with excitement for next season! Student ticket info will be coming this summer, and we can’t wait to buy the Big 10 package again. One thing to look forward to for all home games are the great Fisher tailgates at Fisher Commons. Not only an apartment complex to look into, Fisher Commons is in a central location to bring many current students together.

I also helped coordinate the significant others/partners/spouses (SOPS) breakfast on Saturday morning at Red Carpet, and I learned some great tips for managing time between work/school/home! For example, many current SOPS put together shared calendars for each other to find times to spend together. My husband and I try to eat dinner together almost every evening and spend at least one day of the weekend away from work and study. On the next nice weekend day, we plan to check out the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, while doing some background research for one of the consulting projects I am working on for the Professional Development core class.

Finally, Red Carpet weekend came to a close with our women’s breakfast on Sunday morning. We have a strong group of women coming into the program, and I cannot wait to see how Fisher Graduate Women in Business (FGWIB) and our Forte Foundation connections grow into next year. I had a great time connecting with classmates at the Forte conference last summer (see photo below) and hope to see many again this summer! Also, I hope to see a few admitted students at our first Fisher Women’s Conference on April 6th!

Overall, it was an amazing weekend, and I am looking forward to our incoming class next year!

Becoming a Volunteer Income Tax Assistant

Each year, the Master of Accounting Program organizes the Volunteer Income Assistant (VITA) program to help local individuals file their Federal and state income taxes. We, as volunteers, go to a site twice a week to help individuals who have made appointments.

Most of the tax preparers are either enrolled in the MAcc program or undergraduate accounting students. In order to be certified to help file taxes, we need to pass at least four different exams.

The VITA program not only helps the public to file their taxes for free but also helps our students to apply  in-class knowledge to the real world. It prepares our MAcc students to be more comfortable communicating with the clients and to improve various “soft skills” which are necessary when we start our professional job.

It is definitely rewarding to see what you prepared then get approved– and, in some cases, result in tax refunds deposited to the clients’ accounts. It was a little more difficult when clients would have tax due, meaning that they didn’t have enough tax withheld during the year and they needed to pay the IRS out of pocket. We needED to be very careful about how to deliver the message.

Besides the VITA program, the MAcc Council also organizes other community service events to do our best helping the local organizations and to take part in fun activitiesin and around Columbus.