Rounding Third

It’s hard to believe that we only have five weeks left of our time at Fisher, which is both exciting and sad. This is my second graduate degree, so I knew it would be fast, but somehow, I’m still surprised to find myself this close to graduation. So here is my advice to the current first year class and the incoming class of Fisher MBA’s, as the Class of 2016 rounds third base and heads towards home:

1) Do you. I said this in a post I wrote last year, and I stand by it. You will be in class with people who are brilliant, people who already have established careers, people who have started successful businesses, and people who already have graduate degrees. There won’t be anyone who is exactly like you or who wants the same things, and if you find that you’re on a more non-traditional career-path like I was (non-profits) that’s perfectly okay. Don’t compare yourself to others. Twirl down your own road. There are opportunities at Fisher and ways you can network to get yourself where you want to go. I joined Fisher Board Fellows simply because it was something I loved, and that’s how I got my job.

2) Find kindred spirits. They will advocate for you harder than anyone else. I doubt I would have made it through my program without Dr. Shashi Matta, Michelle Petrel, and Professor John Barker. They are wonderful human beings and I am so grateful for them. If you aren’t finding help through what seems like the more traditional pathways, start knocking on office doors and see who will sit down and talk with you.

3) Never stop asking for help. Ask for help from your teammates, from your friends, from professors, from staff, and from alumni. People are much more willing to help than you think they are, because everyone had someone to help them (or several someones). So ask. And make sure to follow through with a thank you and maybe some chocolate. Everyone likes chocolate.

4) Learn how to be a team player. Work hard to learn how to work with other people. This doesn’t mean be a pushover or a people-pleaser, it means learn how to work together to accomplish a goal. Be a leader when you need to be, but know that the best leaders know how to step back and let others lead, too.

5) Network. Look at everything as a networking opportunity, and a way you can meet new people. Don’t think of it as work. Don’t think of it as asking someone for a job. Think of it as making friends. And you can never have enough friends.

6) Take a leadership position in a student organization. My time on a leadership team pushed me in ways I didn’t expect it to, and it taught me how to adapt to the very different needs of the people on my team. I learned the most about leadership by being on that team, and I’ve seen the most growth in myself because of it.

7) And last, but not least, try not to stress out too much. Two years goes fast, folks. So go to follies, go to girls’ night, and hit all the happy hours. Because the work will be there, whether or not you panic. So try not to panic, and enjoy the time you have at Fisher.

Speaker Series 2 – Mike Kaufmann – CFO of Cardinal Health

kaufman,-mike_cardinal

Speaker Series = Equality in the workplace & challenging the status Quo

I would first and foremost like to give a shout – out to Rebecca Kimball for making this happen. The other Thursday, I had the pleasure of attending CFO Kaufmann’s speaker event at Gerlach Hall. This has become one of the top speaker series that I have actually been to. The subject revolved around professional development in the workplace and equality of the sexes in the workplace. The latter in my view is not talked about enough. When he started outlining how he championed the initiative to encourage more women to speak out and take the international assignments and promotions as well as other positions, it hit home with me. I have had the pleasure of working with women who I thought were the best candidate for the promotions offered but whom did not put their names in the boxes for fear of not having the complete qualifications and reprisal by their workmates. I definitely have always asked myself how that issue can be tackled.

In his answer to tackling the issue, he alluded to what most of us fear doing but always imagine doing. He said just do it in short. If a workplace does not respect equality, then it behooves us as the employees to decide whether our values are aligned with the company’s. I definitely agree with that viewpoint, especially in this age where the workforce is so diverse and firms can benefit from diversifying and the different outlooks that different sides of the sexes can bring to problem solving. It definitely reinforced what I want to see in a culture at work.

He did also go over his personal professional growth which struck me as very courageous. A trained accountant, he decided that he did not want to keep going through that track and went the sales route which he had a passion for. It shows how doing the uncomfortable can often result in our utmost success. I think it hit a nerve with me because when I was working, I had those thoughts where I would see myself in the future and ask if I was challenging myself enough….if I was doing what I needed what I needed to do so that in the future, I could do what I wanted to do.

Overall it was a great speech and I learned a lot from his speech and again a big shout-out to Rebecca Kimball.

CFA Research Challenge Pt. 2

Well, after almost five months of research, writing and preparation, we were finally readyEditing to give our presentation. On Tuesday, my research team and I got up in front of a panel of CFA charter holders to give a recommendation on Owens Corning, a basic materials company headquartered in Toledo. Just to recap, every year The CFA Society puts on a research challenge open to all colleges. The challenge consists of writing a research paper (my last blog) and giving a presentation to the local CFA societies (in our case, Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati). We successfully made it past the paper stage a few weeks back and have since been preparing a slide deck and presentation based on our paper. The presentation was to be 10 minutes long and broken down into a few sections: company introduction and recent events, business segment descriptions, industry overview, financial analysis, valuation (the most important part) and risks. After the presentation there was another 10 minute session but this time the panel could ask us any questions they had.

So we knew exactly what the presentation would be like, we just needed to finalize what we wanted to say and practice until we had it down. It took almost no time to put together our slide deck…memorizing what we were going to say took a bit longer. As a team, we met a few times in the week leading up to the presentation to practice. In the end, we knew that getting up in front of the panel would be a beast all on its own.

Practicing

Finally, presentation day came and what better way to bond with your team then to ride in a minivan together. We made our way down to Wilmington, Ohio (a midpoint between Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati) and signed in right around 4pm. The schedule was: Ohio University at 5:00, Capital University at 5:30, Ohio State Team Sheridan at 6:00 and Ohio State Team Wellman at 6:30 (that’s right, Ohio State sent two teams!).

whole team

While Ohio University was presenting, we decided to find another room where we could practice a few more times. Needless to say, we were a little nervous. For the life of me, I could not remember one of my lines and I was worried it wouldn’t come to me when the spotlight was on. Time was drawing near as we headed back to the waiting room. Ohio State Team Sheridan came out of the presentation room looking confident which, honestly, made me more nervous! Nonetheless, it was go time!

winners

We walked in, greeted the panel, and off we went. I think we did pretty well and apparently the panel agreed! Ohio State Team Wellman took home the victory and will be headed to Chicago in April to compete in the national level competition. Who knows, maybe we can make the Americas competition or even the global level! Look for more to come on the CFA Research Challenge, the journey isn’t over!

(Winners!)

Speaker Series 1- Charles Brandes of Charles Brandes Partners

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Speakers = Knowledge outside of the Classroom

In addition to all the intrinsic value we get from going to such a great school, we are often privy to great speakers who add yet more value to our education. I have had the pleasure of attending a couple of speaker series and would like to share some of these series with all of you. As I am a Finance Major and am pursuing the Investment track within the Specialized Master of Finance Program, I am always intrigued by what standards are practiced in the Industry. Mr. Brandes is a proponent of the Value Investing method made famous by Benjamin Graham and further made popular by Warren Buffet.

Mr. Brandes came to speak to the business school at the beginning of the semester last year and shared his experiences with us. To the ones who wanted to do equity research, he drove the point of value investing home. To be more specific, he imparted the importance of fundamentally valuing firms rather than speculating to the performance of a company. It takes time to truly understand what a business is doing, how it operates, and what its drivers are. When one understands that, then it makes it easier to value a company and not be part of the crowd.

More interestingly is what I just recently learned in my Trading and Markets class. Mr. Brandes was the second Investor to put money into the Investor Exchange founded by Brad Katsuyama as portrayed in Michael Lewis’s book. I definitely was able to understand why Mr. Brandes was and is such a proponent of value investing. I could not do justice to the whole subject of Mr. Lewis ‘s book  (Flash Boys) in such few words but would recommend everyone who reads this blog post to read it and read his other books as well.

Q&A with a Part-time MHRM Student: Chanelle V.

 Chanelle
Hometown: Eagan, Minnesota
Undergraduate Major: Economics & Strategic Communication
How do you manage work and school (views on work/life balance, and tips): Planning, planning, planning! I have realized that my time management is better when I have more things to do. I have no choice but to allocate my time wisely; however, it is easy to get so caught up in work and school that personal life is often an afterthought. My advice would be to schedule time for yourself – just like you would schedule a group meeting or devote time to studying. It’s important to let yourself recharge by doing things you enjoy so school and work don’t become overwhelming. (My favorite thing to do is playing with my dogs!)
"Mom! Enough studying, I need belly rubs!”“Mom! Enough studying, I need belly rubs!”
Favorite MHRM class thus far in the program: One of my favorite classes in the program has to be Talent Management taught by Dr. Larry Inks. There are so many interesting topics covered in the course including talent acquisition, performance management, succession planning, and more. This class helped me realize my professional interests and challenged me to be introspective and think about how the course material has related to my personal experiences.
Favorite extracurricular activity at Fisher: I love being on the MHRM Council! It is so much fun to come up with ways to strengthen the MHRM community and watch them come to fruition. Our goal is to positively impact the program both in and out of the classroom, and the ability to watch the program evolve with the support of our efforts is incredibly rewarding.
Advice you would give prospective students considering the program part-time: Go for it! There are so many learning, networking, and development opportunities that are made available at Fisher, and having the ability to pursue the program part-time is an excellent way to further your education at your own pace. The MHRM program’s evening classes don’t conflict with the traditional workday, so students (myself included) have the opportunity to work toward their graduate degree while remaining employed full-time. As a part-timer, you also get to have classes with first-years, second-years, and other part-timers as well, so I’ve really enjoyed having such a large MHRM family!

Human Resource Invitational Case Competition

Last Saturday, Fisher held the Fifth Annual Human Resource Invitational Case Competition. This competition is an annual competition which involves five premier master’s programs in human resources in the U.S. to compete against one another. These programs including: Cornell, Illinois, Minnesota, Rutgers, and of course, Ohio State. Sponsored by PepsiCo, the case competition requires candidates to come up with solutions based on the case that PepsiCo provided in 20 hours. Derek Lancashire, one of our team members, and my classmates, told me that the process was stressful because they received the case on Friday morning and had to give presentation on Saturday morning. But our team did a good job. They ranked second in the competition. In addition, Marlina Frederick, a second year MHRM student, was given the award of Best Q&A. Well done, buckeyes!

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Uncovering the World of Career Conferences

It was my first year in the MBA, and school had started just a couple of weeks ago. I received an email from the president of the Fisher Graduate Latino Association (FGLA) telling us about this conference happening in Philadelphia: NSHMBA Career Expo (National Society of Hispanic MBAs). It was a 3-day career conference hosted by NSHMBA, an organization dedicated to “increasing the number of Hispanics graduating with MBAs; and to assist in networking by helping secure leadership positions and enhance professional development.” I had only been in the MBA program for a couple of weeks, and I had no idea what this event was, or the great opportunities it provided.

After talking to the president of FGLA and my advisor, I decided to attend, along with 5 other first years and a couple of second years. We arrived in Philadelphia Thursday night, and would be attending the Conference first thing Friday morning. The night before at the hotel, we all researched the companies we were interested in, and took a look at the conference map. There would be so many companies attending! The map, however, only conveyed the scale of the conference to a small degree. When we arrived there Friday morning before the conference started, it was a busy, crazy scene of hundreds of MBAs in suits and with portfolios, eagerly waiting to go talk to the company they were interested in.

The doors to the conference finally opened. I decided to walk around the conference and get a feel for the environment before I talked to any recruiter.  It was an overwhelming experience, since it was my first time in a conference such as that one, but it was also so energizing and thriving. So much talent and opportunities everywhere. I walked around the floor and observed the layout of the conference. Once I felt comfortable and ready to take part of this experience, I put down my coffee and looked at the first company name in my list. It would be a great, long day ahead of me – and I felt as ready as ever to start!

Touring Philly the day we arrived
Touring Philly the day we arrived
Right before starting the conference
Right before starting the conference

 

EY MAcc Speaker Series—Susan Blasik-Miller

This past week Susan Blasik-Miller from the law firm Freund, Freeze & Arnold came to talk to our class. As a lawyer, most of her daily work is spent either training doctors how to avoid malpractice suits or defending them in court. However, unlike many of our other speakers, she chose not to talk about her work. Instead, Mrs. Blasik-Miller talked about things she has learned over her career that she wished someone had told her in college.
Some of her main points were:

Email vs. Personal Communication:

While it is often times easier to just simply send emails to a colleague, it is very beneficial to pick up the phone or stop by their office. By having live or face-to-face communication, you will be able to develop strong connections and strengthen your personal network.

Remember Who Owns Your Work Computer:

What you do or what you send from your work computer can probably be recovered by the IT department of your company. Never post anything from your work computer that you wouldn’t want your boss to see!

Own your Mistakes:

When you do something wrong, own up to it. It is much better for you to admit your mistake to your boss rather than having your boss find the mistake later on when it cannot be fixed. Be open with your communication and don’t try and cover anything up.

Find a Mentor:

Having someone who is experienced in the work you will be pursuing to bounce questions and ideas off of will help maximize your talent. These relationships develop over time so do not fret if you don’t have a mentor within the first 6 months of work.

Mrs. Blasik-Miller touched on many other topics related to career development. It was a terrific experience receiving advice from someone so successful!

CFA Research Challenge

This year, I have had the incredible opportunity to participate in the CFA Research Challenge with three of my fellow SMF’s. The CFA is considered to be the must-have designation in the finance world and the CFA Society is represented by thousands of charter holders. Each year, local CFA Societies host and review local level research papers prepared by college students. Each region decides on a few papers they deem competitive enough to make it to the regional and global rounds. Our local level includes the CFA Societies of Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati so we are competing against the likes of University of Dayton, University of Cincinnati, Miami University and another Ohio State team. If we are chosen for the next level, we will have to prepare a presentation to give to regional and global CFA Societies who will decide on a global winner.

OC Front

We are assigned Owens Corning (OC) as our company to be researched. At the beginning of the competition, we were invited to an investor presentation put on by the Vice President of Investor Relations for OC and hosted by Ohio STRS (State Teachers Retirement System). At that point in time, we found out we had a lot of work to do. We started by splitting the paper into different sections (business segments, investment thesis, financial analysis, investment risks and industry profile) and worked individually on each section then came back together to edit for content and grammar.

JohnWill

By the time we reached a week out from the submission deadline, we knew we had to get in gear. Over that last week, my teammates and I spent anywhere from 5 to 10 hours each day working on the paper. Most of the content was done with about a day to go, we just needed to finalize our grammar and make sure it was pristine. Despite our beliefs that we were ahead, we ended up scrambling at literally the last moment to get it turned in. Who knew that trying to combine a 35-page paper would bog down a MacBook and take a few minutes to upload to the internet? In the end, the submission went through at 12:00.15 and we were safe. Check back here in a few weeks to see if we made it to the regional round!

MAcc Speaker Series: Susan Blasik-Miller

One of the many great aspects of the MAcc Program (and Ohio State in general) is the abundance of fascinating speakers that are brought in to present to us. We have something called the “MAcc Speakers Series” and this goes on throughout the entire year. We have several speakers from all different professional and personal backgrounds come in to present on a topic of their choosing, and we also get to ask them questions. Recently, we had a speaker who has an extensive background in law. She also happened to be a current MAcc student’s mom!

For Susan’s presentation, she chose to share some of the insights and knowledge she has acquired throughout the years of being a lawyer, an employer, and a mother. Here are some of the things she shared with us:

  1. Email vs. Personal Communication: There are many positive and negative aspects that come with email and constant communication. She stressed the importance of building relationships, and how this is difficult to do from email communication alone. Also, never deliver bad news over email or ask for special consideration over email.
  2. Remember who owns your business computer: Susan shared horror stories of people losing jobs, being sued, and suffering severe embarrassment from things they have done on their business computers. Overall, it is best to keep emails free of jokes or innuendos and to not use your business computer for something that you wouldn’t want others to see.
  3. Own mistakes: We should always admit to our mistakes. Although we might get punished for admitting our mistakes, companies have professional liability insurance in case mistakes happen. The insurance no longer applies if we try to cover up our mistakes, and thus it is important to never try and cover anything up.
  4. Don’t isolate yourself: Get your work done, but also build relationships within the firm and try to meet as many people as possible. This could include doing things such as joining work intramural teams, volunteering, and going to other social events with coworkers.
  5. Find a mentor: It is important to find a mentor at any stage in your career. You are never too old to have a mentor!
  6. Broaden your horizons: Join organizations that you are interested in joining. You never know what people you may meet that will one day be future clients or a future contact for a business opportunity or favor.

I really enjoyed Susan’s presentation and she shared some very good things to think about as we begin our future careers. I also like that many of the speakers, such as Susan, do not have a background in accounting, but they are still able to share very relevant and interesting topics with us.