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The World Is Yours (not Scarface related)

With grad school in full swing now, it’s fair to say one thing is certain: Everyone and everybody seems to want your attention. Let me elaborate. First, your professors, they all have passion for what they teach and are very excited to share that wealth of knowledge they have with their students. Whether it be economics, the NPV of a capital budgeting problem, or even professional development and mannerisms; they point is they want to teach you; therefore asking for your attention.

Second, consider your group projects.   Everyone in the SMF program is placed in a group early in the semester.   Its fair to say this group that is used for basically all of your semester classes quickly become like a small family, wanting to work on group projects, thus, asking for your attention.

Third, consider the wealth of extracurriculars that Fisher has to offer.  Whether you decide to join or not, participate as a board member, or casual member, these groups are asking for your attention.

Finally, career services here at Fisher want us to succeed.   As Audra Fry, my personal career guidance partner, excitedly wants to share the wealth of resources available to landing that awesome job after grad school.   You may conclude where I am going with this: they are asking for your attention.

I wouldn’t recommend using the example of Tony Montana, however accept the attention of others is a way to truly make the world your own.

The point is easily made.  What about your personal attention?   That comes with good time management, planning and sometimes a little luck.   However when you choose to focus your attention to something, usually it’s in the form of doing something to better one’s self. Yesterday marked Fisher’s career fair at the Ohio Union.   Approximately 137 employers were present, looking for those that decided to accept the attention others were giving and turn it into something personal for yourself: A Job.  The career fair presented plenty of options for business students both in undergrad and grad school to dive into opportunities of all proportions.   In the end, the attention you choose to accept from others, and turning it into productive personal attention (i.e. the job fair) is just another way as a grad student you can set yourself up for success.  Accepting the attention of others in grad school is of major benefit.   You will learn more, be involved, land a job and even make a few friends in the meantime.   The world truly is yours…


“Chef” Restaurants in Columbus

In my attempt to adapt to the rapid moving life style of a Fisher SMF graduate student, I have personally failed already in my attempt to save more money.  How does one save money?  Cooking at home for most is the best start.   The average meal I have cooked at home thus far costs me roughly $3.50.   Eating out?  Roughly $12 (after tip) and can grow exponentially if you find yourself ordering alcohol.  If any good has come from my failed attempt to cook is that I have discovered two very good home-style restaurants that offer great options for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Chef-O-Nette (2090 Tremont Center, Upper Arlington)

Styled from an era before this millennium, don't be fooled by the offerings of its menu.

Chef-O-Nette’s interior is similar to what one would expect a diner to look like from the 1950s.  I went for lunch with a few friends and discovered a must have item. Their milkshakes. Diners are traditionally known for greasy food and milkshakes, and Chef-O-Nette answers to the call.  Priced a bit steep in my opinion ($3.50 for approx 16oz), the taste makes up for any raised eyebrows on the cost.  I chose the vanilla which was far superior to any shake at Shake-N-Shake or Johnny Rockets.  I politely asked for a free refill but the waitress laughed and looked as if I was psychotic.   The lunch menu offerings are mostly a la cart, but fairly priced in my judgement. I chose a chesseburger and it was excellent.  Its a 1/3 lb patty cooked medium well by default and comes with all the trimmings for only $3.50. Adding fries will cost an additional $2.00 only.   The restaurant however has their “claim to fame” item, which is the “Hangover Sandwich”. Perfect for those late Saturday and Sunday mornings, the Hangover comes with a hamburger patty shacked with shaved ham as well.   In all, Chef-O-Nette is perfect for a breakfast or lunch, with a nostalgic diner feeling paired with excellent customer service.   It is no wonder Google Reviews gave it a 27/30.

Chef’s House (5454 Roberts Road, Hillard)

The second “Chef” restaurant is another diner style restaurant just west of Columbus in Hillard.   Like our first choice, the menu is full of traditional diner items, with a classical, yet simplistic decor inside.  Rumor from the streets was Chef’s House has a major specialty on the menu that sets a favored breakfast item apart from anyone else.   Established in 1989, Chef House’s hash-n-eggs is a cardiac pumping treat.

Chef's House: Tasty Hash and Eggs to get the heart pumping

While most restaurants that offer hash and eggs usually serve some version out of a can, traditionally with tiny diced potatoes and grounded up corned beef (or even ground beef), Chef House’s hash is from scratch.   The actual corned beef part of this meal is ripped pieces of corned beef, pan cooked to perfection with sliced onions and peppers.   The potatoes are sliced pieces that are added as an optional side.   Eggs come with the meal and the portion is generous for about $8.99.   While I wouldn’t recommend eating this daily per the FDA, this is most definitely a treat and worth the drive down interstate 70.   The menu offers traditional mom and pop diner food such as sandwiches, soups and burgers. It would be serving the eggs and hash a great disservice to fail to even consider this meal when ordering.   Urban Spoon rated Chef’s House 8/10, but the hash is a perfect 10 in my book.

In all, the quest to find “Chef’s” in the Columbus area proved to be fruitful for those times I choose to not be one myself.

JB


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