CSCMP Roundtable Event

This past Thursday was my first experience with CSCMP. CSCMP (Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals) is an international organization for supply chain professionals. During the luncheon, I was informed by an active member that the Columbus CSCMP Roundtable is among the oldest roundtables dating back to ~50 years ago. The long history was impressive but what really impressed me most was the new knowledge you get from attending the event.

The adventure started at 10:15am (departing from Gerlach Hall). Steve Singer, career consultant for MAcc, MLHR, SMF, and MBLE, was our driver. It was also his first time to CSCMP Roundtable, and it was really nice of him to take 11 students to the event. Ever since I went to Fisher, I realized that networking is one of the most important things you actually learn in business school. Studying is definitely important but business school separates from other graduate programs in that “soft” abilities such as communication are emphasized more, as they might be the keys to our future success. Therefore, we dressed in “business formal” and embraced the golden opportunity to go into the meeting room with experienced supply chain professionals.

Upon arriving, networking started even before we entered the meeting room. I approached the people around me and made introductions. People were nice and they enjoyed sharing their experiences with me. Also, at the end of the luncheon, Steve taught us a lesson of how to network even if you are not an expert in the field . According to him, using some more personal interest-related topics (e.g. football, etc.) is definitely helpful. Surely, there were people in the fields of procurement, inventory management, transportation management as well as supply chain consulting … how could I have same level of interest to their field and have a nice professional discussion with them all?

This luncheon had a specific topic. IBM North American Leader in Optimization & Supply Chain Software Group gave us a presentation about optimization in supply chain. The presentation was built on very large quantity of data and information. Lack of experience as well as “English as a second language” created somewhat of a barrier for me … however, I still was able to get a sense of the latest trends in the field of supply chain management and I definitely enhanced my understanding of the concept “optimization” as practiced in the real world.



The content and opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by The Ohio State University or Fisher College of Business.