Varsity Club: Say Hello To Goodbye

Varsity Club: right there on Lane Avenue, across from the fabled Fisher and Gerlach Halls.  It was one of the first places we went, orientation mixer, and had a chance to really develop the bonds that this Cohort is known for.  Second years are still talking about and envious of how well we’ve meshed. Reference my Cohort blog post here.

It’s the first place we got to say hello, relax a little and let the business school armor fall to the ground with a clang on the concrete floors outside the school where they belonged.  We are MLHR, and we are like none other, not MBA nor MAcc.  There’s a spirit in us that is different, undeniable and incredible. Because of this, we let ourselves be unguarded and vulnerable, mingle, really know each other, and start to form this amazing cohesive unit that we are today.

I did not have the final that everyone took this night, but I wanted to meet up with everyone there at Varsity Club afterward to say goodbye to those that would be leaving soon for their summer internship adventures, because I love each and every one of them.  We have become more than friends, more than colleagues, and more along the lines of family and veterans of a war.  The war is grad school, we are wearing Purple Hearts proudly, tending to each others’ wounds, talking about kills and comparing scars.  We leave no one behind.  I have more brothers and sisters than I could ever have hoped for, and the blood we all share is scarlet and gray.

When we first met at the Varsity Club for our very first mixer, we were a ragtag bunch of adventurers, vagabonds, neophytes and strangers.  We knew nothing about each other and we were sizing each other up as competition.  Varsity Club changed that for all of us, and we are stronger, wiser and better because of it.  We are a melting pot of personalities, cultures, backgrounds and education that reflect the business world so absolutely and perfectly.  Because of that, and what we learn from each other, we will all change the world.

Unfortunately, the last time we got together at Varsity Club as an entire Cohort was sometime early Winter quarter.  Tonight, however, we gathered to say our farewells and good lucks and congratulations and expressions of missing and keep in touches and best wishes.  It was like coming home again for the holidays.  The din of shuffling tables and scraping chairs as we grew in number and decreased and grew again; people playing Chinese Fire Drills as we switched around to talk to each other; voices carrying across the expanse of the bar and tables; flashes of cameras and scents of greasy food was like a reunion.  Here was our family, battered and exhausted, but happy and content.  We were together again.  And for a night, we laid down our burdens and regaled each other with memories of things past and visions of things future.

Varsity Club is the place where we came to shake off Stats, had cold drinks to cast off the coils of Compensation, and release the tension from Research Methods.  It was our hub, the focal point of our angst and anxiety, freedom and fear, happiness and horror. This place served as our escape from errors academic, advent of adventures, loudness of laughter and safe place for sorrows.  Here we could be together and all was well because of that.

Soon we will all part for our separate journeys.  It will be strange to not see each other for hours of days, days of weeks and weeks of months.  But I have no doubt in my mind that the bonds we made and the experiences we shared will stretch across state lines, miles of continents, leagues of oceans and seas, time zones and meridians.

We will be together soon again though, more experienced and worldly, stronger than ever, happier to see each other and more ready for the challenges that will face us come September 21st.  We will be first years no longer.  We will be second years, but we will be second to none.  That is how strong we are, because nothing can come between this Cohort and what we will do.

I love you all and wish you the best for the summer, for the coming year and for all that we will encounter afterward.  Together.

(nearly) Group Photo At Varsity Club

"Mom and Dad" Their nicknames for the year

Two of the MLHR boys, Shawn and David

Me and my mei mei (little sis)


3 Responses to “Varsity Club: Say Hello To Goodbye”


  1. 1 Abby June 7, 2011 at 11:29 pm

    I’ve been through the MLHR program and it’s no war. Comparing yourself to a purple heart recipient for having completed it is just disrespectful to our brave soldiers who have earned such an honor.

  2. 2 Wesley Lin June 8, 2011 at 6:23 pm

    I’m sorry you feel that way, Abby.

    But speaking with members of my cohort, it has been like a war for some of them that came straight from undergrad that have had to learn to balance the course rigor as well as a social life and a job or those that have been in the workforce for several years and, as such, are unaccustomed to the demands of being in an academic setting again.

    My metaphor comparing us to Purple Heart recipients was not meant to be disrespectful, but meant to be a comparison that emphasized how difficult the program has been for some. I have nothing but pride and respect for the veterans that have served our country, including some of my closest friends, colleagues and family members. And thankfully those that have read this blog have not found offense at my metaphor.

  3. 3 The Right to Remain Anonymous June 8, 2011 at 10:04 pm

    As a war veteran, I can attest that there is nothing “like” a war that brings people who have no connection or affiliation together “like” a family. What Wes writes is true — there is nothing like congregating together at the Varsity Club, sharing “war stories” about FastCat, group projects, HPWOs and HR Scorecards. The Varsity Club is our VFW. I took no offense to his comparison and, if you didn’t serve our country as a soldier, sailor, marine or airman, then I don’t believe you are in a position to comment on what is disrespectful and what is.

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