My New Habit

What new habit I could establish living a busy life in grad school, you might ask. Meetings! Taking four classes implies that I have four groups, one for each class, and a typical week can be like the one I just had.

Thursday evening, my first group meeting of the week as my simulation group decided to switch our regular meeting to Thursdays. We were told that the study room GE R237 was reserved for us. Our group members spent some time searching for that mystery Room 237, with R236 and R238 found but never was another room seen in between. As a result we had to compete with the P&G Case teams—they competed for the prize we competed for a room—and we managed to occupy a medium lecture room for our discussion. As the end of the simulation competition approaches, our company confronted increasing challenges. One night was not enough, and “let’s meet again on Friday morning”.

Friday, our simulation team stayed at the same spot for 6 hours until we finally felt the decision we made was reasonably reliable. We had some Chinese food together afterwards.

Saturday, meeting for the AMIS824 memo at Laura Anne’s place. Laura Anne’s cookies were great, and her hamster Beevo likes me. Working hard and being efficient, we were able enjoy the football games after our meeting.

Sunday, two in a row. Meeting my AMIS804 crew at 2pm, and we were done in half an hour, a new record! I stayed for another meeting with the FIN811 group. And there came the highlight of the week, we figured we were really ahead of time—the professor’s instruction for the case was not available yet. Meeting was canceled. Class dismissed.

Meeting with groups is no longer simply meeting for projects and homework. It has blend in with my daily life. It can be part of hanging out with friends, having dinner or sharing snacks, and even fun and games. Sometimes I even do it without a project base, like the one I mistakenly called for on Sunday. That’s why I said meeting with groups has become a habit of mine.



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