Using Study Abroad to Explore Your Passions

Emma Goilo shared her passion of travel, which motivated her to go abroad on the Student Exchange Program to Trinity College, Ireland. What she gained was an expansion of knowledge on different countries and many skills and qualities that developed her further personally.

My passion is traveling, I love to visit new countries and learn about the culture, the language and most importantly the people that live there. I have traveled to 35 countries and I am just getting started. I was fortunate growing up to have parents that valued travel, that made sacrifices to ensure my brothers and I saw the world and always supported what we wanted to do—whether that be volunteering in Colombia for a few months, dropping everything to travel or studying abroad. Having parents that support my passions has empower me to seek more opportunities.

Acropolis
Sahara Desert – Morocco

The ability to travel was the main reason I chose to participate on the Student Exchange Program at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland – a main hub for Ryanair. While abroad I made it a goal to travel to places I had never been before. I went to Scotland, Estonia, Latvia, Finland, Greece and Morocco, as well as some places I had been before. I learned the history of the places I went and definitely enjoyed the food. I think I grew a lot the past semester as a result of my travels. I went to places where  most people don’t think to travel and to places that pushed me as far outside of my comfort zone as I had ever been—which is where growth happens. An example of how I grew during my travels was in my thoughts for others. When traveling with others, I had to learn to make decisions and choices that benefited the group and that addressed the desires of the group and not just myself. The study abroad opportunity that Fisher provided for me, and even supported, allowed me to live my passion and for that I will always be grateful. And the best part about studying abroad is now I have friends from all over the world to visit!!! My passion for traveling was only quenched for the moment, I will always be planning my next trip.

To summarize, here is a list of some of the skills I learned abroad:

  • independence
  • adaptation
  • cultural intelligence
  • collaborating with individuals from high and low context countries
  • self awareness

I think it is really important that students have goals for their abroad experience – personal goals, experiential goals, and academic goals. But I think it is just as important that students be open to change and experiences they couldn’t have imagined. The best thing about studying abroad are the things you don’t expect, the friends you don’t know you are going to meet. My biggest piece of advice for students preparing to go abroad is balance. Have goals, but don’t let them put you in a box. Be prepared but don’t become paralyzed by the unexpected.

How Traveling Develops Better Leadership

On the Student Exchange Program at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, Emma Goilo describes how she developed her leadership skills and global citizen mindset abroad.

Since I was little, I dreamed of living abroad. I wanted to live in a glamorous and architectural city, with rich history. And last semester I achieved that dream. I spent four months living in Dublin, Ireland and attending Trinity College. I studied, made life-long friends from around the globe and got to travel. What I didn’t realize about education abroad is how much I grew, the challenging academic environment and diverse social situations made me a better leader. I came back from Dublin more self-aware, a truly global citizen and with the ability to work with and empower diverse groups of people – all factors I consider vital in leadership. I went abroad to travel, to study and to make friends but came back to the USA a more developed leader.

I believe that to be a true leader one must be self-aware, have the ability to empower others and be a global citizen. Being self-aware means to know not just your strengths but your weaknesses. I believe that addressing weaknesses and compensating for them is even more important than flexing your strengths. The biggest strength that I encountered within myself is adaptability. I was able to quickly adapt to my environment: a new country, a new university, and a new group of friends. This adaptability will serve me well in my career, I will be able to quickly adapt to new work teams and to new work locations. I think I was adaptable prior to my semester abroad but this exchange experience gave me a chance to practice and further develop that strength. One weakness I encountered while abroad is that I require structure and at Trinity College there was a lack of structure I am used to in the USA. Classes don’t have weekly assignment, exams or even structured class. I quickly learned that I had to adopt the classes to my strength. I had to make small weekly assignments for myself or come exam time I would flounder. This experience made me realize that I must adjust situations to play to my strengths, rather than to my weaknesses. Another key component of leadership is having the ability to empower others. While abroad I was able to empower my friends to face their fears and to speak up to things they didn’t agree with. I believe that being a true leader isn’t about making yourself look good but making whatever team you work on look good as a whole. Finally, being a leader means being a global citizen.

This doesn’t mean that you have to travel to be the most traveled, it means that you have an appreciation for cultures different than your own and you value the perspectives that come along with those diverse cultures. I believe those are some of the key components to successful leadership and that my time abroad pushed me to work on being self-aware, on empowering others and on being a global citizen.

Intro To Ireland – The Return

This is my last post as I am now home in Ohio! It’s weird being home and not being able to wake up and walk to Trinity, but after four months it’s great to see friends and family again. Though, I did prefer Dublin’s winter weather to Ohio’s. The snow was a major plus but the temperature could be better.

Trinity

To anyone thinking of going abroad, after my experience, I would highly encourage it. Exchanging is way more than seeing sites or mastering a language, but those are great pluses. It’s the friends you make and the once in a lifetime experience that you will remember your whole life. Since I grew up in Ohio and have lived here my whole life, it’s an amazing feeling to know I have friends not only in Ireland but spread across the world. It also boosts your confidence in your ability to travel and adapt to new situations. Think about it. If you can survive in a foreign country, entering a new company culture will be nothing even if it’s across the pond. Personally, I would love to work abroad one day, but always felt like that was a huge daunting step. Now that I have lived abroad I know how it feels, how the adjustment period goes and that it wouldn’t be as daunting as I thought.

One of the biggest highlights of my exchange was getting to go to a Gaelic football game at Croke Park, the main stadium that all finals are played in. I have grown up seeing these games and the stadium, but going to a game as a local was amazing. I’m sadly still not 100% sure of the rules but got to experience something that I only could in Dublin, Ireland. Even the less glamorous parts, like getting there was exciting as I knew the bus system and the city well enough to do it without help.

Game

One big piece of advice I would give to anyone is to stay organized! It can get overwhelming during the application process and while abroad. If you apply to Trinity the process is slow, so don’t panic if it takes longer than others. Other than that don’t forget to explore outside of the city your in and have so much fun.

Intro to Ireland – Packing

Packing you life in a few suitcase it tough, but Grainne Hutchinson, attending Trinity College on the Student Exchange Program, share some tips with you as she packs up her life in Ireland.

As my time in Ireland wraps up I thought I would give helpful tips on how to pack your life up when your time abroad has come to an end. It’s a tedious process and a kind of sad experience, but a happy good sad. I also strangely love to pack so I know a few tips.

One major tip I would give is regulating what you buy abroad! Make sure to keep in mind what you buy either has to fit in your suitcase or get left behind. Bringing an extra bag so that you have extra room on the way back is a great way to accommodate all the purchases you will make abroad. Because have no doubt you will be acquiring souvenirs no matter how hard you try. You’re going to want your exchange school’s attire, aren’t you?

Another tip is to pack early and slowly at the end of your time abroad. You have a lot of stuff so packing the morning of your flight or even the night before is not a good idea. Maybe start packing the week before and focus on all your souvenirs and stuff you won’t need in the next week. Also start gathering stuff you don’t think will make the cut home; if you have time, you can donate them to charity shops like Oxfam, basically the British version of Goodwill. All the kitchen stuff and bedding you will buy can be donated to charity shops or left for the next students who go abroad.

Oxfam

This is also a great time to narrow down your wardrobe, especially if you need room or weight in your suitcase. Keep in mind if you didn’t wear it while your abroad and have a limited wardrobe you probably won’t wear it at home. When packing to leave the U.S., bringing things that you plan to donate at the end will help with the room in the suitcase at the end.

My room all packed up.
My room all packed up.

Other great packing tips include rolling your clothes instead of folding them; witch helps with space and wrinkles. Putting socks in shoes to save space in your suitcase, especially if you’re putting them in your carry-on. Wear your bulkiest shoes on the plane; you can always take them off as well as your bulkiest jacket. That’s all for now!

Intro to Ireland – Last Days

You might know how to navigate the end of semesters at OSU, but do you know how to in Trinity College, Ireland? Grainne Hutchinson shares her advice in navigating Trinity’s exams and end of semester as she studies on the Student Exchange Program.

As the weeks are narrowing down, I thought I would give some helpful info on the last days of being abroad.

First the last weeks get a bit crazy. Trinity usually has their exams at the end of the school year, but as an exchange student, you will have papers in their place as you either won’t be there for them or have missed some of the class. I would completely recommend making plans with your new friends to meet and say goodbye before you hit your last week as you might get to stressed with packing and papers and run out of time, as near the end, it fly’s by.

I would also ask your teachers how papers are required to be turned in, most often in Trinity a hard copy of papers are turned in to the department office with a cover sheet assigned by the department. If you’re leaving somewhat early, I would check with the professor to make sure you will be in the country to do that. If not don’t worry, they can also be uploaded on Blackboard, Trinity’s version of Carmen. Also as it’s the end of the year, the library is always crowded and any textbooks you might need will probably be rented out.

Ran my fastest 5K in Ireland! Thanks to research into what 5K where available.
Ran my fastest 5K in Ireland! Thanks to research into what 5K where available.

Upon reflection, the big thing I would tell people is If your thinking of going abroad I would start a checklist of the places you want to see and things you want to do before you leave. At the very least I would do some research into what there is to do. This ensures that you don’t get to your last week and find some incredible things you didn’t know existed. I would highly recommend doing this with weekend trips as well, as you are limited on time, you want to make sure you do all the things you want to.

Intro to Ireland – Brexit

As Grainne Hutchinson studies in Ireland on the Student Exchange Program, she enjoys her involvement with the University Philological Society. From seeing the first minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, and talking about Brexit and the affect on Ireland, she shares her experience of the wonderful events held at Trinity College.

I know I have mentioned the great things you can do when you join societies, but I had the awesome opportunity through the University Philological Society to see the first Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon speak, and I feel like I should stress it again. The Hist (College Historical Society) and the Phil (University Philosophical Society) are both debating societies within Trinity, and I highly recommend joining one as they host some great speakers every term.

Hist

Nicola Sturgeon was being presented an honorary membership in the society and answered questions first from the head of the Phil and then from the audience. She was, of course, asked about Scottish Independence, as there was a referendum in September of 2014 where the Scottish people voted to decide if Scotland would remain part of the United Kingdom or become an independent country. She gave her opinion that she would love to see Scotland as an independent country and she also said she feels it could happen in her lifetime.

Nicola

She was then asked how the first ministers of Scotland felt about Brexit. For anyone who doesn’t know Brexit is, it was another referendum that took place in the United Kingdom asking the people to vote on whether they want to remain the European Union (EU). They voted to leave, but the logistics for how and when they will leave has yet to be decided. She expressed her opinion that she would like to see the parliaments of Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales have a say in the logistics of the departure from the EU. She also stated when asked if she thinks Brexit will lead to another referendum in Scotland, and she said that she is aware that the vote in Scotland was in favor of staying in the EU and doesn’t want the people of Scotland to be forced into something they don’t want, but she is also aware that more people may want to stay in the UK than in EU.

Before I came to Ireland I didn’t now what Brexit would affect, but through discussions in class, my visit to the dial and Nicola Sturgeon I have learned a lot. As the logistics are still being worked out, no one knows what it will affect. There are many factors that will need to be worked out between the EU and the UK, so everyone is waiting on the UK government to decide a few things. In Irish opinion, there are opportunities and fears surrounding Brexit. One huge opportunity for the economy is that business that needs headquarters in the EU and is currently headquartered the UK may move to Ireland to stay in the EU as it is the only other English speaking nation. A big fear is that, as immigration was a big issue in the discussion leading up to the referendum, Irish citizens might have a harder time getting visas and working in the UK, as before there was freedom of movement and they didn’t need a visa. There is also concern over if current EU citizens that are living in the UK will be expected to apply for visas to stay.

Mostly it’s a waiting game to see what Brexit will do, but Ireland will be just affected as the UK when it does happen. It’s a bit scary and anxious to think about as there is no way to really prepare. We will just have to wait and see what happens. I still don’t know enough about international relations and trade to predict how it will affect the US but I imagine there will be ripples that will reach us even across the pond.

Intro to Ireland – Travel suggestions

Want to know some travel tips to Dublin, Ireland and London, UK? Grainne Hutchinson, studying on the Student Exchange Program to Trinity College-Ireland, shares her favorite places in these cities!

Over the week of Thanksgiving, my brother came to visit me in Ireland as he could take time off and didn’t have to pay for accommodation. We then took two days and flew over to London, my favorite city in the world! Not that Dublin isn’t great but London has so much history and culture and a little bit of everything for everyone. So I thought I would dedicate this post to two things, the main things to do if you ever visit Dublin and all the great things there are to experience in London if you visit there as well. Even if you study someplace else in Europe, I would highly encourage you to visit these magnificent cities.

The first thing is a list of thing to do in Dublin and why. Defiantly look into the Guinness Storehouse Tour, it’s a bit touristy but very informative. Plus where you end your tour has a great areal view of Dublin that’s perfect for pictures. There is also the Viking Splash tour, which I highly recommend. It takes you through the city and gives you great insights into Dublin’s history and culture. But it’s not just any tour you’re in an old “duck,” a car that can also be a boat, and your tour guide is a Viking as are you (complete with a hat). If you’re ever walking through the streets of Dublin and a weird looking car full of people wearing Viking hat’s roar at you, you’ve encountered the Viking Splash tour. The last thing you have to see is, of course, Trinity College Dublin! It is one of the most beautiful campuses around and is home to the Book of Kells and the long room.

IMG_3957

Now on to London! There are so many great things to do in London, and it may depend on your time and what kind of things you like to do. Some of the greatest museums are in London; my favorite is the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A). The V&A is basically just a giant collection of things from jewelry to keys. The British Museum is better if you’re only in the city for a few days, it has the Rosetta Stone, parathion marbles, and an Easter Island statue among many other things. Buckingham Palace, Big Ben, and the London Eye are all kinds of tourist but in my opinion not worth missing. The changing of the guard in front of Buckingham Palace can be missed, though; it’s also impossible to see with all the tourists and it takes about an hour. One last thing I would suggest is the Cutty Sark in Greenwich. It’s a tall ship that has been transformed into a museum, so you can go inside and all through the ship. It is on land now, but it is still impressive, though I love boats.

IMG_5644

There are a lot more great things to do in Dublin and London, but these are the ones you can do if you are pressed for time and things average tourists don’t think of.

Intro to Ireland – The Business Community and Gender

Grainne Hutchinson shares her observations as she attends Trinity College’s first ever women’s leadership conference while on the Student Exchange Program in Ireland. The event consisted of professionals from Microsoft, CPL Resources, UK Investment Bank, J.P. Morgan, and former McKinsey & Co Consultant.

This week I got the amazing opportunity to attended Trinity College Dublin’s first ever women’s leadership conference. The Stronger together, women in business conference featured many different women speakers as well as a Q&A panel with various women and men in leadership roles throughout business and government. The Keynote speaker was Brenda Trenowden, who is the global chair of the 30% club. The 30% club’s primary purpose is to help achieve the goal of women holding at least 30% of leadership positions throughout companies. She started by explaining as alumni of Trinity she saw her graduating law class of about 70% female, and when she moved on in her career to assisting with her law companies recruitment of graduates, she saw them take in around 70% as well. But then when you look at leadership level the number extremely drops off. She went on to explain that in her opinion there are many contributing factors as to why this happens and that by discussing this matter and the reasons, we can come to an answer on how to overcome them. I personally was shocked to hear that with 70% of graduates being women that only around 10 to 20% make it to the leadership level.

http://tba.ie/women-business-stronger-together-conference/
http://tba.ie/women-business-stronger-together-conference/

Following the Keynote speech was a panel discussion moderated by Dearbhail McDonald, the Group Business Editor for the Irish Independent (A Newspaper in Ireland). The panel consisted of Catharina Hallahan, Managing Director of Microsoft, Anne Heraty, CEO and Co-Founder, CPL Resources, Ina De, Co-Head of UK Investment Bank, J.P. Morgan, Stephan Donnelly, Independent TD and former McKinsey & Co Consultant. The panelists first answered questions put to them by the moderator and then took questions from the audience.

From this experience, I found that the gender division in the workplace is different in the UK and Ireland than in the US. For example, there is a stronger feeling here that women should be the primary carers of children, and a larger amount of women leave the workplace after having children. Ina De shared her story of when she was expecting her first child and had concerns over working after he was born. She explained that she felt that working would disadvantage her son, but in hindsight, she said she thinks he was more advantaged with her working. In her view, it gave him perception that a woman working were the normal thing to do. She also said that she feels more access to childcare will help women stay in the workforce after having children. I personally agree with her that there is a perception that woman should stay home after a baby’s born and it was interesting to learn that she thought her decision to go back to work actually helped her son more than if she had stayed home with him.

The conference was a great way to learn what challenges and differences there are in the Irish business world. In this case, the problems were very similar but that helped me to see a new view on old problems. I would highly encourage fellow students who exchange to participate in these events. They are an excellent way to get an open dialog about the business community and have any questions you have answered.

Intro to Ireland – Reading week

Have you ever hear of Reading Week? Grainne Hutchinson explains this system at Trinity College, as she studies on the Student Exchange Program in Ireland. Also sharing her tips and advice on how to take good use of the Reading Week.

One surprising difference between the Irish and the American University systems is the Reading week. Essentially every semester half way through there is a week where no classes take place. Students are encouraged to “re-read” through the class notes and readings but mainly the week is a chance to decompress from school. I know we have Thanksgiving break and fall break but there not quite the same as a reading week. I strongly prefer the reading week style of Semester but with Thanksgiving as late in the year as it is I can’t see the U.S. ever switching over. That being said, allow me to plead my case for reading week.

Ocean

So this is kind of implied, but it’s a full week, basically spring break in fall and spring! Two days for fall break and three for Thanksgiving are short and hard to fit relaxing things into like travel and family. In a way, its not enough time to shut your brain off school mode as lots of teachers still gives assignments over break. A week, though, as with Spring break, is plenty of time to travel home, with friends or just have time to do other activities. It also gives time to distress, and returns to school with the same motivated mindset may students lose half way through the semester. It is kind of a weird system we have if you think about it, why do we only get a week in the Spring? Are we not just as stressed in the Fall?

Another point in its favor is the fact that it splits the year up into four equal parts. I have noticed, in my classes at least, that teachers use them as mini-semesters and they sort of wrap up what you should know and what you will be learning next. The week gives students a time to make sure they don’t fall behind or can catch up if they did fall behind. If you feel you don’t understand something its hard to dedicate time to it if you still need to be learning something new every week. A stop in course work can give them that time for further study, to be better prepared for the next half of the class.

Norway

I used my reading week as a time to travel (Went to Norway!) and work on schoolwork (Finished an essay!). A lot of the students here balance their time throughout the reading week, unlike a lot of people in the US including me. I think with the breaks so evenly spaced the year doesn’t feel as confining as our system, so students don’t feel the pressure to relax. I know personally I always want to get away on Spring break, as there seems to be pressure to make it count and by the time is comes around its much needed. Those are just my thoughts on the systems differences, though, and I would highly encourage students who exchange to Trinity to review class work at least once as teachers expect you to have a better grasp on the knowledge after the break and be prepared to build off what you learned.

Intro to Ireland – The Government

Join Grainne Hutchinson as she explores the political world of Ireland while on the Student Exchange Program. Hear what she has experienced visiting the Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Irish parliament, and her observations on how networking is done in Ireland. She also shares some advice on how to get involved at Trinity!

Dia dhuit! (Hello!)

This week I got the exciting and rare experience to visit the Dáil Éireann! The Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Irish parliament. The Houses of Oireachtas, the Irish Congress, has two houses the Dáil Éireann (House of Deputies) and the Seanad Éireann (Senate). The two houses function somewhat the same as their American counterparts. One huge difference, though, would be that instead of the Prime Minister of Ireland being directly elected as our president is, he is nominated by the Dáil Éireann and to stay in power must keep the majority support of the Dáil. That’s a big difference between the US and is made even clearer to me as this is an election year. It would be like if we voted in our state representatives and then they chose the president out of all the candidates the parties put forth.

Picture of the Dáil. Photo from the Independent. Phelan, Shane. "Dail Bars Forced to Chase 11 TDs and Senators over Their Unpaid Tabs." Independent.ie. N.p., 2016. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.
Picture of the Dáil. Photo from the Independent. Phelan, Shane. “Dail Bars Forced to Chase 11 TDs and Senators over Their Unpaid Tabs.” Independent.ie. N.p., 2016. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.

Membership to the Dáil works a lot like membership to the House of Representatives in the US. The “Teachta Dála”, in English “deputies to the Dáil” usually just called TD’s, are elected in by their constituency. The constituencies are determined by population, and there must be a member the represents every 20,000 to 30,000 people. At the current moment there 158 members and 40 constituencies. 

I was invited as part of a Society I joined at Trinity, as it was a political society it’s going to remain anonymous. We were addressed by current TD’s and given a short speech on Brexit, as it will affect Ireland quite a bit as well. Then we were shown one of the two bars that are located inside the Dáil (because it’s Ireland) and a had a drink while we mingled with other students and current TD’s. Networking in Ireland is about the same as in the US. In this case, there were about three TD and 30+ students but every TD tried to say hello to each of the students there while I find in the states they usually let the students come to them.

I would strongly recommend students going abroad to join societies and make the most out of them! They can help you make friends as well as give you once in a lifetime opportunity. Definitely join the ones you have an interest, but consider some country specific groups as well. For a trinity example, there are always sports clubs to join but do consider clubs like The Hist or the College Historical Society. The Hist which I joined is mainly a debating society that everyone is welcome to, whether you debate or not. They are one of the oldest societies and host famous guests from time to time. This experience might be the only time in your life you can experience the culture like a local so join clubs that focus on local things like hiking or food. Or if you’re still feeling adventurous after agreeing to live in a foreign country for 4 months join a sports club you never could back home, in Trinity’s case Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) clubs like Gaelic football and Hurling. I would also suggest looking at the international student club! At Trinity, the club arranges travel weekends all around Ireland and connects you to full-time students from your home country that you can go to for advice or questions. Thats all for this time!

Sláinte! (Cheers!)