Christmas Days

Rikkyo University is also named Saint Paul’s University, and it was founded by Channing Moore Williams, an Episcopalian missionary. Therefore, there are deep religion traditions at Rikkyo University.

This is the main gate of Rikkyo University, and the two big trees are decorated as Christmas Trees. There was also a lightening ceremony of these Christmas Trees on December 3rd 5:00 pm this year. On that day, many people came to Rikkyo campus to see the ceremony. I had a class at that time, so I could not see the ceremony myself =( This picture was taken by my friend.

Besides these two trees, there are also many beautiful paintings inside the Rikkyo campus, celebrating Christmas this year.

These three paintings are on the buildings at Rikkyo University. Several days before, I saw some students were working on them, and now, they are all finished. I like these paintings because they make me feel warm in heart.

Job hunting season at Rikkyo

The job hunting season in Japan is quite different from that in the US. Most colleges students in Japan tend to finish their study when they get the bachelor’s degree and start to work in companies, rather than entering a graduate school. Therefore, college students have to start their job hunting process in their junior year, and most of the students will find jobs before their graduation.

My Japanese classmates and professors at Rikkyo University told me that the Junior year is the busiest year for students because of the pressure to find a job. Also, the chance to get a job after graduation is very low for college students in Japan.

The year arrangement in Japan is also different from the US. The school year always starts in April or May, so the autumn semester is the last semester in their Junior year. The job hunting season this year started in November. So it is very common to see students wearing suits walking in the Rikkyo campus starting November.

Weekend in Kyoto-Japanese Autumn and Red Leaves

Last weekend, I had a very short but memorable trip to Kyoto, the old capital city of Japan from more than a thousand years. Before Japan changed its capital city to Tokyo, Kyoto was the center of Japanese politics, economics and culture.

We were taking the Shinkansen (the high-speed railway network in Japan) from Tokyo to Kyoto. It took around 2 hours, and on our way there, we met the Mount Fuji, famous for its snow-white “hat”.

In Kyoto, there are a lot of traditional Japanese Shrines, or Jinja, and temples.  Many of them exist since the ancient times. When we were visiting the Yasaka Shrine, there was a conventional Japanese wedding held inside the shrine (Shown on the middle of the picture above).

Kyoto still keeps the traditional side of Japanese culture. Unlike Tokyo, which is more modern and westernized, people living in Kyoto are more likely to wear Kimono, the traditional Japanese clothes. At first, I was curious to see so many people wearing Kimono walking on the streets. I asked my friend whether there was a festival these days so that people wear Kimono. My friend told me that this is their life style.

Also, we saw several Geigi on our way to a temple, shown on the lower left corner of the picture above.

The natural sight in Kyoto was so breath-taking! It made me feel as if I were in the ancient time of Japan.

And… we also tasted the food in Kyoto. I just think that is is art rather than merely food!

Self-pressured Learning Pattern at Rikkyo

The teaching pattern at Rikkyo University is quite different from that of OSU. Although, this semester, I am enrolled in 8 classes, but I never feel stressed out. At first, I unaccustomed to the teaching pattern here, because instructors didn’t us a lot of pressure.

There is a kind of course called Research Seminar here at Rikkyo University. The Research Seminar is held every year, and according to the standing of the students, they could choose to enroll in the seminar. I enroll in the 4th Year Research Seminar for International Business. The class size is small, and there are only 12 students in our class. I talked with my Japanese classmates in our class, some of them told me that this is the only course that they are taking this semester. The time arrangement in Japan is also different from the US, college students always graduate in March, so this is the last semester for them. The content of this seminar is unique, too. Every week, we have a report or part of a book to read, mostly they are theories about the current international business.

This is one of the books that we have to read in three weeks. It analyzes the changing patterns of Japan and Germany under the global trend of Financialization and under the impact of US and UK.

Our instructor, Professor Ozaki, never forces us to do anything. At the beginning of this semester, he told us about our assignments and time arrangement. Then, all we have to do is to study by ourselves, reading the books and discussing during the class time.

I think this kind of teaching pattern is really depending on students ourselves. It is really self-pressured. And it requires me to be more careful on the time arrangement for my study. Professors do not keep sending us email to tell us what is due. And this is also another new thing I learn from this exchange experience.

Encounter with Jinja

When I was hanging out with my friend today in Tokyo, we just had a unexpected and surprising encounter with a traditional Japanese Jinja. Jinja is the Japanese name for Shrine. It is the place where people come to make wishes to Gods. Most Jinja’s in Japan were build in old times and are kept perfectly almost in the same way until nowadays. We never thought about that there could be one there, because it was a really modern area where we were walking along. The Jinja itself is located between modern buildings in a small street.

These are wish-paper that people tied on the ropes, expecting the Gods can know and help them to achieve their wishes.

The atmosphere in Jinja was really amazing, because it made me feel that I was taken back in old days. Through the marks by the time left on the building and wood, I can imagine how many years has passed along with this Jinja. The Jinja never seem to be unhomonized with other modern surroundings, rather, it is a place where I can get closer to the tradition and culture of Japan.

Quietness in the Modern City

Tokyo is known as a modren city in Asia and even in the whole world. Long before I arrived here, I was expecting the life in Tokyo would be in rapid pace. But when I actually experience the life here, I just found out that the quietness of life in Tokyo is really enjoyable.

Every morning, I was walking from my dorm to Shiki Station to take Densya. When I pass through the street, I can feel the atmosphere of leisure conveyed from other people. It does not imply that everyone is quite relaxed, of course. People in Japan are very hard-working. What I meant is that people are really enjoying their life, even though they have to try hard in their work or study.

Sometimes I can hear people greeting their acquaintance on the street, or saying “Hi” to their familiar store owners. And the way they are talking is not like western-style, such as speaking very loudly or giving a hug to others. They always speak in a relatively low voice and very politely. And my Japanese friends also act in this way. I am also changing my greeting-style gradually. Instead of running to my friends as I always did, I’m now rather smiling to them firstly and waiting until we walk toward each other closer, then we start to talk.  But this way that people are communicating with each other never makes me feel we are more distant. This “quieter” way of communicating can also strengthen our friendship, and sometimes a smile can convey more and people can feel more even if we do not say  a lot of things.

I think this is not just because of the differences between the east and the west. Rather, it is more about Japanese people’s life attitude and the Japanese social culture. And I am really enjoying and appreciating this quietness in Japan, because it tells that even in the modern city like Tokyo, I can still feel the warmth conveying from others.

 

 

School Starts! New life in Japan.

Rikkyo’s fall semester starts relatively late, and it was September 23rd. Thanks to that, I was given enough time to get myself used to the new life in Japan and also explored interesting things around here. Actually, I am not unfamiliar with what Tokyo is like and how life in Japan would be, because I have been watching Japanese dramas and animations for several years.

When I finally got here, I just found out that my life will be more exiting that I thought before. The first “challenge” that I met in Tokyo was that I have to take Densya (It is a public transportation similar to subway) to get to Rikkyo University everyday. My dormitory is actually in Shiki, which is about 25 minutes Densyaride away from Ikebukuro where the university is located. And I had firstly to figure out which line to take and remember the pronunciation of the names of the station where I need to got off. This was a big task for me because even though I could recognise the Kanji’s (similar to Chinese characters), they have really different pronunciations between Chinese and Japanese. And since Ikebukuro Station is a big and crowded station, every time I wanted to take Densya, it was really hard for me to find out which platform I should go to.

This challenge is tightly related the cultural shock that Japan gives me. I am Chinese, so I can read nearly all the Kanji’s shown outside. But the meanings of Kanji’s are also different from Chinese. Now, when I read Kanji’s in Japan, especially the name of stations and Densya lines, I automatically arrange myself in to three steps: read the Kanji’s, memorize the characters in Chinese, and then memorize the pronunciation in Japanese.

People in Japan are really really polite. When I go to convenience stores or other places, the sales person there are talking to me in KeiGo, which is a highly formal way of speaking. I was not very accustomed to it, so I just kept saying “Thank you very much” to them. As for the business part, I think the courses here can serve as a great example. I registered for two Research Seminars and a course named Bilingual Business Project. The reason why I mention these three courses is that we will be working on real business projects in these courses. For instance, in the Bilingual Business Project course, we need to finish a Marketing Project for Wendy’s retargeting Japanese Market, and the client, representative of Wendy’s will also come and evaluate our projects. I think I had a really good start for my new term and new life in Japan, and I hope that I could learn a lot not only in the business field but also in cultural field.