‘Tis the Season

One of the best parts about the Holiday Season in Europe is the Christmas Markets, or the Weihnachtsmarkt as they are called in Germany.  You may be wondering what exactly a Christmas Market is.  Well it is all of the joy of the holiday season, thousands of people, great holiday shopping, delicious food, and historic towns all rolled into one.  Since these markets are so irresistible I’ve visited the ones in Koblenz, Strassbourg, Offenburg, Rothenburg od der Tauber, and Nuremberg.  Living in Germany for this past semester has obviously made me partial to  the authentic German Christmas experience so this past weekend I made my final travel destination the markets of Rothenburg and Nuremberg.

Rothenburg was my favorite town in Germany that I’ve visited so far because of all the great history that comes with it.  It’s the best preserved Medieval town in Germany and it certainly looks the part.  Wandering through the lanes of houses and around the historic wall that dates back to the town’s founding and is still standing one can forget for a moment what century they are really in.  When I visited I even went on a tour of the city with a Nightwatchman who told us all about the city’s long and interesting background.  And while their Christmas market certainly isn’t the largest I’ve seen, it’s definitely the most adorable and authentically German.

Rothenburg 1 (640x471) Rothenburg 2 (640x480)

Nuremberg also had a great market, it’s heralded as one of the most authentically German as the town has very strict rules about stall decorations and merchandise to try and keep the market as traditional as possible.  While I was in Nuremberg I also got to participate in a local myth, there’s a fountain in the main square that has a gold ring on the gate.  It’s rumored that if you spin the ring twice and make a wish, it will come true!

Nuremberg (640x480)

The Christmas Markets have been a great conclusion to my semester in Germany but they, among a plethora of other factors, are going to make it so hard to leave in just a few short days!

The (Not So) Hidden Benefits of Studying Abroad

It’s no secret that when you study abroad you get to see a different part of the world and experience so many new things that you never expected. What I didn’t realize was just how much I would get to see when I left Ohio at the end of August.  Not only have I gotten the opportunity to explore Germany and the area around where WHU is located, I have been able to travel to places that I’ve always wanted to visit.

This past weekend I travelled to Amsterdam and was able to see the Anne Frank house, something that I’ve wanted to do since I was in 3rd grade. I’ve also been able to hike in the Swiss Alps, see where the Sound of Music was filmed, visit Oktoberfest in Munich, the Berlin wall, Westminster Abbey, castles in Cardiff and so much more!  I never dreamed of being able to visit so many cities in such a short amount of time or see things that I’ve been reading about for years. Next stop is a tour of Italy where I get to hike to the top of Mount Vesuvius!

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At the East Side Gallery in Berlin

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In the mountains of Engelberg, Switzerland

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Castle in Cardiff, Wales

Yet another benefit that I didn’t realize before I studied abroad was how much these experiences are helping me prepare for future jobs and interviews. Just the other day there was a huge train strike in Germany and I couldn’t get home from where I was travelling and ended up having to find an alternate route home. I used this experience as a positive example of how I could adapt to change and respond under pressure in a skype interview a few days later; the recruiters loved that I had such unique experience and that I was able to incorporate seeing different pieces of the world into my education.

The people you meet while travelling have also been so interesting and something that was completely unexpected. There is such a variety of people in the accommodations I used at all these different places, from people in their mid-20s who quit their jobs to travel Europe for 9 months, to fellow study abroad students, to people from half-way around the world. The diversity is endless and such a wonderfully unexpected part of study abroad because you get to hear the world views of so many people.

There are many more benefits waiting to be discovered and I can’t wait to find every one of them!

Studying at WHU

The German education system has been an interesting experience, but I couldn’t be happier that I selected WHU for my exchange!  WHU is really good about accommodating their Tauschies, what they call exchange students, and making exchange the best experience possible.

Class was a little strange at first as I had to adjust to a 3.5 hour lecture… for all of my classes.  It was rough but the professors really find ways to break up the class since they know we can’t possibly handle all of the information at once. My very first lecture I was shocked when all of the WHU students started applauding the lecturer at the end of the period. It’s just what you do at the end of the lecture, no matter if it’s your regular professor or a guest speaker and it was an interesting culture difference.

All of the campus buildings, and the buildings around Germany, are really neat because they’re typically constructed around the remains of 15th or 16th century buildings.  For example, one of the buildings on campus was a monastery at some point but has since been converted into an office/general purpose building on campus. It still has the original chapel and vaulted cellar (where the monks used to store the wine they made); it’s so cool being seeped in so much history!

Another thing that I love about the WHU class system is that it allows plenty of time for travel. It’s such a cool experience to be able to hop on a plane and be in a totally different country, culture, and environment in just a few hours. I’ve already been to Spain, Belgium, and Switzerland and am going to Berlin this weekend!

WHU is also really great about introducing you to German culture. We went on a tour of the region a few weeks ago to see one of their local vineyards in Boppard (as the Upper Rhine River Valley where I’m located is famous for its wine) and then to eat a traditional German meal (which was DELICIOUS). I also visited the Deutsches Eck, the point where the Rhine and Mosel rivers meet. It’s located in Koblenz, the bigger city around the teeny tiny Vallendar where WHU is actually located. It was such a cool experience!

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In the vineyards of Boppard!

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At Deutsches Eck

All in all WHU is a great school; they really welcome their Tauschies and allow us to get a great education, but also leave us plenty of time to explore the world!

The Final Delivery to DHL

At long last, after months of state-side preparation and three weeks of conducting interviews here in Germany, we’ve reached the end of our project with DHL. Wednesday was presentation day for us, meaning we spent most of the morning and early afternoon fine-tuning content, doing dry-runs of the PowerPoint, and of course, having the occasional last-minute freak out. Oh, and we also forgot to do a blog post amdist all of the final preparations (#SorryKurt).

Look at that sick VIRO model on my screen...

Look at that sick VIRO model on my screen…

Mike, Vince, and the rest of the DHL team invited us north to the company’s headquarters in Bonn one last time to deliver the final presentation. Through the magic of teleconferencing, our findings would be shared with not only the DHL executives in Germany, but also the US-based team back home. And while a few technical snafus delayed the start of the presentation, we delivered our best presentation yet over the next two hours. Each person on the team brought their A-game and was very knowledgeable on their own section and the entire presentation at large. Overall, our presentation was very well-received and will be a tangible asset for DHL to use when educating employees on the buyer behavior of automotive companies for supply chain services.

Team DHL Celebration Selfie

Team DHL Celebration Selfie

However, the success of the project would not have been possible without the incredible level of accessibility and time that each and every person at DHL gave us. Mike White, DHL Supply Chain’s Senior Vice President for the Global Automotive Sector was beyond generous with his time, working with us prior to the trip and on a daily basis once we arrived in Germany. Mike connected us with a wide variety of DHL personnel, including Vince, Scott, Markus, Frank, and Jan, who gave us genuine and transparent insight into the business’ current operations and what lies ahead in the strategic vision. We owe them everything for their genuine interest in our project and openness to share their thoughts.

We also felt very privileged to speak with many of DHL’s customers, some of which headed up multi-billion dollar business units. We greatly appreciated DHL’s immediate faith in us that we would represent our sponsors well in these meetings. As this project was very customer-focused, these client interviews were the backbone to our final findings, and without them, we would not have been able to deliver the true value that DHL was looking for when they brought on this project.

Road Trip!

Road Trip!

DHL also gave us the opportunity to see not just the city of Koblenz, but much of Germany itself. Over the course of the three weeks, we covered over 4,000 kilometers of traveling via the Autobahn (likely accumulating our fair share of speeding tickets once we found out that posted limits were legit and not merely suggestions) and saw much of the beautiful German countryside.

DHL Truck Selfie

Last night, we reflected back on the past year (our first year as MBA students) officially come to an end with the conclusion of the GAP program. It’s hard to believe that just nine months ago, we barely knew each other or where our experience at Fisher would take us. Since then, we’ve formed deep friendships, survived the competitive internship search, and broadened our business knowledge through the classroom. However, without question, the most memorable experience of the entire year will be the thrill of flying to an unfamiliar land to work on a pressing issue for a Fortune 100 company that will have a real and meaningful impact on their business. It was truly an honor and unforgettable experience to work with DHL over the last few months and we thank them for giving the six of us lifelong memories.

With that, we also thank you, the readers, for following our adventures over the last three weeks.

Auf Wiedersehen!

Team DHL at HQ

Water water everywhere!!!


We just got back from Cologne after wrapping up our final review session with the client. This is it guys… tomorrow is the D-day (So glad we are done before my birthday!!). We have traveled a lot during this trip, some days coming back to Koblenz to only sleep! Like our client mentioned today “it was like you guys were put in a dishwasher or dryer and rotated”! But we had a jolly good time!!!

No matter what Rick Steves has to say we are in love with our Koblenz; a quaint little European town with numerous town squares, historic statues and the river by our apartment. It is fascinating to see the cuisine variety we here. I came across three Indian restaurants near a single square! But what I loved the most about Kolblenz were the fountains.

Most of us from team Germany have forgotten the taste of still water (much to Devin’s dismay). Whenever you ask for water here it is normal to be served “wasser mit gas” (water with gas) so we (by we I mean only Devin) have to specially mention “wasser no gas” or still. There is not free water/tap water concept here!! Even though it is completely safe to drink tap water Germans don’t offer it; the word for tap water is “leitungswasser” which converts as plumbing water, sooo offering plumbing water is a no no!! So, where does all of Devin’s water go in Koblenz… the fountains!!!

The most famous one though is the Spitting Boy of Koblenz. We found that out the scary way. Imagine taking a late evening stroll and stopping to admire this statue and suddenly he starts spitting water (I think one of us even screamed!)

Spitting Boy!!!

The Spitting Boy is actually called Spitting John who represents all the bastard sons of invading French soldiers. This shows the town’s dislike for foreign authority.

More beautiful fountains:

The Koblenz Fountain: depicting its history

The Koblenz Fountain: depicting its history

Girl playing with ducks

Girl playing with ducks

Dancing Couples

Dancing Couples

Trying to figure out the strange take on Noah's arc!

Trying to figure out the strange take on Noah’s arc!

See… water water everywhere!!!

Now we get back to fine tuning our final presentation. FYI everyone is invited to the Wednesday night karaoke project ending/birthday party!


Cruising on a Sunday Afternoon

Did every GAP team spend the weekend in a vehicle besides a car? Seriously, between boat trips in Oman and Malaysia and Team France taking to the air, we covered enough modes of transportation fit for a Steve Martin/John Candy buddy comedy.

Well, Team Germany was no different. Sunday was our big social outing with the DHL team, as we celebrated the conclusion of our three-week stint in Europe. Koblenz, our home base for the project, is nestled at the confluence of the Rhine and Mosel, making it the perfect spot for hopping on a boat and seeing some castles. Let’s do this thing.

Look! There’s one now!

Castle #1

Little did we know that Sunday also happened to be the Koblenz Marathon, thus creating a logistical snafu (ironic given the subject matter of our project) and causing two of our guests to literally miss the boat. Seriously, couldn’t they have run 26.2 miles (sorry, 42 KMs) somewhere else?!?!

More Rhine Prettiness...

More Rhine Prettiness…

To no-one’s surprise, Natalie became claiming castles for her future reign in a merciless Cerci Lannister-like approach that left few survivors in her wake.

Castle #3

While the weather in Koblenz has mostly been reminiscent of our much-envied Columbus climate, the sun broke through this afternoon, initiating the overdue brews on boats segment of the trip. Fun fact we learned on the trip: Germany has an official association of castles, headquartered at the stunning building below.

Castle #4

Germany Castle Association HQ

While on our trip, we got to bond with our contacts at DHL (Mike, Vince, Yan, and Scott – a Fisher alum!) and their families. Little did we know that we were sitting amongst a celebrity the whole time. Our main POC at DHL, Mike White, was an extra in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (thank God it wasn’t the fourth one).

After cruising down the Rhine for a few hours, we stopped over at Boppard, a small village along the Rhine, to meet up with the rest of the team for ice cream sundaes. And my God were they delicious.



But alas, all good things must come to an end. such as this project in the next 48 hours. As we disembarked for our trek back up to Koblenz, we said farewell to a few of our DHL contacts for the last time. It’s truly been a pleasure to work with the world’s leading logistics provider over the past three weeks. We’ve had incredibly access to executives from leading auto manufacturers and tier-1 suppliers all across Germany, and of course, DHL itself. And now, it’s time for us to return the favor. Stay tuned for more information on our final presentation in the next few days!

DHL Boat Cruise 2K14!

DHL Boat Cruise 2K14!


Having a Dam Good Time in Amsterdam

Yep. That’s right. We went to Amsterdam.

Leaving the open and unrestricted speed lanes behind us (seriously Netherlands, 120 km/h? We’re driving German-engineered cars, not Power Wheels), Team Germany headed north for the weekend to get our passports stamped in another country.

What’s that? You don’t get your passport stamped when you come in by car?!?

Well, whatever, we went to the Netherlands and we have the pictures to prove it.

I Am Amsterdam

Upon emerging from the depths of the Amsterdam Metro system (side note: the city-wide janitorial staff for the Metro system is currently on strike. Every train and station looked like the spaceport in The Fifth Element [credit Tim Kiss for that amazing reference] and we weren’t going to be the scabs to start cleaning up the place), we realized that we sorely lacked the appropriate transportation needed to get around the city.

In Amsterdam, the pecking order for right of way goes like this:

  1. Bikes. All 1,000,000+ of them. Seriously, it’s insane.
  2. Boats (while not conflicting with traffic, they are the object of desire of every pedestrian in the city)
  3. Mopeds
  4. Cars
  5. Pigeons
  6. People with walking sticks
  7. People biking with a giant bucket in the front of their bike to carry other people who were too lazy to bike (shocker: Natalie wanted to rent one of these)
  8. Regular people walking

In front of my very own eyes, a guy was clipped by a biker and started bleeding from his arm right in the middle of the street. This was treated by the locals as a regular occurrence.

Speaking about unusual lacerations to the body, Friday night’s events included a stop over at the Vincent van Gogh museum, which doubles as a music venue on Friday evenings for aspiring DJs and contemporary jazz bands. @JoeyClarktheIII would have uttered the phrase “the jams” a record number of times.

Friday Night Lights at the Van Gogh Museum

Friday Night Lights at the Van Gogh Museum

Later on, we took to the streets to continue our Street Dance Party: International Tour Edition (copyright 2014). Knowing that we would be calling Saturday an early night as we needed to hit the road first thing on Sunday, we committed to Friday being a big night and subsequently closed down the Amsterdam bar scene. Hamburg trained us well.

Sruti and Natalie Dance Party


Saturday was filled with enjoying quite possibly the nicest day in human history. We kicked off the morning with a boat ride from our hotel through the heart of Amsterdam’s canal system, checking out the best of the best houseboats Amsterdam had to offer. While this was a great way to experience the entire city by day, we were suffering from serious FOMO once we realized that you could rent private boats and drive them yourselves. Unfortunately for us, everything was already booked for the day. I’ll regret not driving around a boat for the afternoon and having my team refer to me as “Captain” until the day I die.

Over the course of the day, we worked through one of the biggest open-air markets in the world, took a nap in a beautiful park, stumbled upon the Royal Palace, visited Anne Frank’s house, and caught the Netherlands soccer (excuse me, football) game with a wild crowd of spectators. Oh, and we got a bunch of cool pictures too. Check ’em out.

Netherlands Bridge



Team DHL at Royal Palace


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Man I really mailed in the end of this post. Until next time Amsterdam…


92 Plates of Sushi on the Wall…

With just under a week to go until our final presentation to DHL executives, our group was hard at work on Thursday, formulating our strategy and pulling together the frameworks for a cohesive presentation. This week, we were able to augment the wealth of information we gathered the week prior with newfound information we gained from a global OEM and Tier-1 auto supplier in Hannover. We finished combining these two data sets to prepare the first draft of our presentation for Professor Matta (our academic advisor for the trip) who would be arriving in Koblenz shortly.

For the second straight day, our team sought shelter in one of the comforts of our homeland – Starbucks. While our three week long conquest against our struggling WiFi continues to hamper our progress at-home, it’s been a bit of a blessing in disguise. With connectivity fit for the Ethiopian team, we’ve immersed ourselves throughout the city of Koblenz, befriending any dining establishment willing to provide even a moment of free access.

After our group reached a consensus on the first draft of our presentation, we headed upstairs to check out the food court in Koblenz’s one and only mall. Having dabbled into many of the different ethnic food groups throughout Koblenz, we realized that sushi was a glaring hole in our cuisine bucket list. For the low, low price of 9,90 Euro/person, we dove into the sushi buffet and never looked back.

Sushi Plates

At least for the first 92 plates. Between five of us, we came damn near close to pushing the century mark on plates of sushi (thanks but no thanks to Sruti for not joining us in body but not in spirit on our quest). At one point, I made a quip about how disgustingly American we were with our large appetites and raucous personalities. Our German-Japanese (what a combo!) waitress silently agreed. And by silently agreed, I mean she verbally acknowledged my comment and agreed that we were basically the worst.

Later in the day, Professor Dr. Matta graced us with his presence. We had a chance to walk him through our progress and gain valuable insight into how to make this a memorable and actionable project for the DHL executives.

Team DHL with Matta

Once we finished usurping the lobby of his hotel for an impromptu meeting, the group headed out for authentic German-inspired Italian cuisine along the Rhine. Having nearly eaten the entire town’s supply of sushi between five of us earlier that day, our stomach and digestive track rallied from a deep hole to dig in on the delicious food.

All in all, Senor Professor Dr. Matta seemed as content with our presentation as he was with his seafood dinner. With much of the legwork of our presentation behind us, we called it an early night to prep for our final site visit on Friday before heading off to Amsterdam for the night.

If we happen to find anything noteworthy from our trek to Amsterdam, we’ll be sure to share it here over the weekend. But I’m doubtful that will happen.

Guys, We Might Die Tonight

There were many things we planned for heading into the GAP program: dealing with a language barrier, powering through brainstorming sessions at odd hours of the morning, trying out new cuisine, and building great rapport with our client.

But nothing could prepare us for this. Guys, we might die tonight.

I write this message from my phone in a bedroom on the upstairs floor of a random family’s home. How did I end up here, along with Sruti and Brian, you ask?

In an effort to beat traffic and knock out the four-hour drive before our 1:00PM meeting in Hannover tomorrow morning, we decided to make the trek up this afternoon. After adopting a lexicographical approach (#thanksmatta) by lowest price towards our living quarters for the night, we landed two sweet $90 apartments just outside of town. When we “checked in” this evening, we found out that the “apartments” were really one apartment and two rooms in a separate house across town.

In my mind, Natalie, Tim, and Devin are basically staying at the Ritz. We, on the other hand, are staying with a random family that doesn’t speak English, already mocked us in front of the neighbors, and is sleeping in the next room over. Brian and I have adopted the buddy system in one room and Sruti is left to fend for herself in the other room. Sorry Sruti.

This night ends in one of three ways:

  1. We wake up tomorrow like nothing happened and after a night of crying ourselves to sleep, arrive at our 1:00 meeting in one piece
  2. We befriend the nicest German family of all time and enjoy a hearty breakfast with them
  3. They turn Brian’s ribcage into a lampshade, wear my skin around like the guy from Men in Black, and feed Sruti to their dog. BTW, the dog is also mean

My money is on #3. I’d upload pictures so that the authorities know where we are but our host family’s WiFi password doesn’t work and we’re too scared to ask them for help for a third time.

If we survive, we’ll post a picture in the morning. If not, thank you for your loyal readership and best of luck on your 2015 GAP Project!