Audencia, Nantes Education

Hello everyone! It is near the end of the semester here at Audencia in Nantes France, and so far I have had the time of my life on the Student Exchange Program. Studying abroad has been the best decision I have made in my life so far and I have made memories that will last forever.

In this blog, I will discuss the academic side of my experience. I attend a business school that is ranked in the top 5 in France that consists of about 3,000 students. This has been a huge change coming from being around 60,000 students at Ohio State, as you see classmates every single day at the University. The classes each consist of about 40 people, and roughly 30 of these students are in every single one of your classes. This has allowed me to really get to know a lot of people in the classroom setting, which I feel is much different than back in the US.

Also, the classwork here is heavily oriented on group work, also helping further develop these relationships. The groupwork in France is much different than in the United States, as people do not have a strong time structure on when to get things done, and tasks are often not split up like they are back in the US. The whole group normally meets to do the entire project together, and meetings often consist of a lot of talk outside of things pertaining to the project. Another difference in the education system here is the way things are graded. The scale is from 0 – 20 instead of A – F, and grades are rarely given back on any of the work turned in during the semester. This makes it hard to judge how well the student is doing in the course, but also helps keep each student motivated to do well from start to finish. Classwork consists of mainly case studies and presentations, and then the semester ends with final exams worth anywhere from 50% to 100% of the grade.

The overall experience at Audencia has been great, and the classes I took in the Grand Ecole (general course) program served as a great connection of the material of what I have learned in the US. Audencia has been a fantastic choice to continue my educational career abroad!

Social Life and Traveling in Nantes and Europe

Hello everyone!

In this post, I will discuss the social life living in Nantes, as well as the travel I have been able to do living in Europe. Before departing for Nantes for the Student Exchange Program, one of my main concerns was leaving my friends back in the US and having to meet all new people from different countries when I arrived here. I am a very social person and looked forward to being around all new people, but it was definitely nerve racking.

However, the social life I have had here in Nantes has been absolutely incredible. I have met and become close friends with people from over 30 countries, and I will have these relationships for the rest of my life. Just on my floor in the residence, I have friends from Ireland, England, Belgium, US, Spain, Finland, Mexico, and Argentina. This group, along with about 50 other international students and 10 friends from the basketball team I joined at Audencia, travel, hang out, and pretty much do everything together. This was a big adjustment, as at Ohio State you only see 5-10 people every day, and the rest maybe once or twice a week. It really allows you to become close very quickly, and everyone has truly become a family. It is so cool how everyone has a different background and culture, but are all here for the same reasons and connect right away.

Outside of the social life, traveling has been another great thing about being in Nantes. Nantes has both a main airport and main train station, making it very easy to get anywhere around Europe for a low cost. So far, I have traveled to Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, and roughly 6 cities around France. I still have plans to be in Portugal, Spain, and 6 more cities in France before returning home, and I cannot wait! There are several websites and travel methods that can be used to get around Europe, and through searching all the options it can be done at a very low cost! The trips I have been on have shown me many different cultures and ways of life, and have truly allowed me to have a better view on life. I will never forget the people I have met here and the travel I have done, and am so thankful to have had the opportunity.

Nantes Culture and Lifestyle

Hello from Nantes!

In this blog, I will talk about the culture and lifestyle living in Nantes, France while on the Student Exchange Program. The culture is so much different than what we are used to experiencing living in the United States, from the architecture to the food eaten every day to the clothing worn.

To begin, everything in Nantes looks fancy compared to what I am used to seeing in Columbus. All of the stone buildings, miraculous churches, and weaving roads along the river truly are part of the French culture. It provides a sense of happiness, as even on the grey and rainy days the city still looks pretty. The food eaten in France is not overly different from that in America, but the stereotype about the bakeries and baguettes is definitely true. Being able to wake up in the morning and have breakfast from one of several fresh bakeries is definitely something I will miss back in the US. It is a part of the culture here, as people take the time each day to go and buy fresh products, opposed to buying things from the grocery store for a week. The clothing worn in France is definitely more stylish than the common clothes seen walking around a college campus in the US, as no sweatpants or sweatshirts are worn unless sports are being played. However, I did expect it to be a little more fancy than it is. A pair of jeans and a sweater is okay to wear to any night venues, and the majority of restaurants do not require professional dress as well.As far as the lifestyle goes in Nantes, things are a lot slower. Through the hour and a half lunch breaks, everything being closed on Sundays, and long processes to complete normal day tasks, time is stressed much less here. It is clear to see the citizens of France value building relationships and taking time each day to relax and enjoy life, opposed to the constant upbeat living style in the United States.

Overall, I have truly enjoyed being in a new culture and adapting to the lifestyle here in Nantes. There have definitely been a few times that things get frustrating, but I have grown tremendously as a person and will treasure my experience here forever.

Traveling Smart with Your Smartphone

I have publicly rebelled against having a smartphone since high school, when all of my friends made the transition. I did not believe they were worth the expense, but when I decided to spend a semester abroad, I realized there could be some advantages. Most notably, having a smartphone gives you access to a GPS which is extremely helpful when you’re lost. Additionally, there are many moments when you’ll need to look up things you wouldn’t have expected, such as the opening hours of a restaurant or store. Internet isn’t as widespread in Europe as I was used to it being in the States, so having a data plan was essential for me to manage my time effectively. I found my data plan to be cheaper than the one in the States, however I did have less data, which required me to be selective with my access. I recommend getting the proper simcard and plan in your host country as soon as possible. This will also be good when you meet new friends at orientation and in your classes, as you can swap numbers right away!

There are also a lot of very helpful apps. Here are a few that I used while abroad:

Word Lens
Worried about getting to a restaurant and not knowing how to order in another language? This app translates the words of any picture you provide, offline. It’s extremely effective when you want to translate a whole paragraph instead of having to type each word individually, and also a lifesaver when you don’t have internet access. I would also recommend getting another translator app with audio, if your phone doesn’t already come with one.

Google Voice/Whatsapp
By now, most people know about Whatsapp. It is a free messaging app for anyone with a smartphone to connect. There is also an app called Google Voice, which works a bit differently. Google Voice actually gives you a vacant US number (if you set it up while you’re still in the States) and then allows you to call and text via this number to US and Canada numbers for free. Neither of my parents have smart phones, and a lot of my friends in the US didn’t have Whatsapp, so I used Google voice to text them. Once you set up the number, you can download the app and text them like you would normally, as long as you have access to internet. Then, you can call them via Hangouts which is directly connected to Google Voice. (Technically, you can call them via Google Voice as well, however if it is connected to your US # it will not work when you get a new simcard)

Instead of dropping hundreds of dollars on Rosetta Stone or an extra language class, Duolingo is a free website and app that allows you to practice a language in an easy and fun way. The app focuses on language you would actually use (for the most part, one exception was when it taught me how to say “I am a butterfly” in French), and goes at whatever pace you are comfortable. I would argue it’s not necessarily sufficient to learn the language totally, but as a beginner or someone trying to refresh their memory, it is a great tool.

CityMaps 2 Go
This app downloads maps of major cities (you get 4 free!) that you can access offline. It is perfect for traveling, and easily highlights tourist hotspots to visit. It’s much easier than carrying a map everywhere, and you can put a thumbnail on key locations (such as your hostel) on it as well, incase you get lost.

At the risk of sounding motherly, I strongly advice you to get this app for safety reasons. If you are going to a hostel by yourself, or on a date with someone you just met, or any other situation you are wary about, you can sign up for this app to check in on you at a designated time. If you don’t respond, it will alert your friends or other emergency contacts. Even if you don’t have a smartphone, you can sign up for this free service online.

Lastly, if there is some sort of Kill Switch you can download on your phone (Android and iPhone both have it), I recommend getting it. Europe is notorious for pickpockets, and I had the unfortunate experience of having my phone stolen. I called my parents immediately, and my phone provider got me a new phone within 6 days, making the process as painless as possible. Another friend of mine was not as lucky, and had to buy a basic phone to use for the rest of the trip. In the beginning of the trip, I found I was very vigilant over my belongings, but as time passed, I became more relaxed. My phone was taken when there was only a month left in my program. On a positive note, as I had personal information on my phone (from Venmo to Amazon), I was extremely thankful I could delete all of this information after my phone was taken.

Remember, the most important thing when you’re traveling is to be smart and safe. With the right Apps, your smartphone can make your travel experience that much easier and more enjoyable!

Job Hunting While Abroad

Searching for a Full Time job in the United States while abroad started out as perhaps one of the most difficult challenges I’ve ever had to face. As I entered my Consulting Major at Audencia Ecole de Management, I thought that I might want to pursue a career in consulting. While the major showed me that this wasn’t a field I wanted to enter into directly, it equipped me with a lot of great skills for presenting and case interviews.

Additionally, I applied for a few interviews via FisherConnect, and with the help of Mark Wilson from Fisher’s IT Department, was able to Skype interview from abroad. All of the interviewers commended Fisher for making it so easy for them, and I also appreciate the time they dedicated to ensuring my interviews went smoothly. It was nice to always see the familiar face of Mr. Wilson before I went forward with my interviews!

Overall, the process definitely had some added stresses, but Fisher’s resources made it much easier to apply and get in contact with companies. I also sought out a few companies outside of the ones that normally recruit at Fisher, and found the process to go smoothly. Some companies did request to send me back to the United Staes for a second round interview, which certainly made the process more difficult. Others, offered to interview me when I returned in December.

Audencia Ecole de Management offers a number of resources for job hunting, including resume reviews in both English and French. The school also has its own job fair, called the Audencia Forum, in early October. These jobs are typically in Europe, and more specifically, France. Currently, I would like to work in the States, so I neglected to attend. However, there were many top companies such as Ernst & Young, Amazon, and Unilever. If you are planning to apply abroad, it is imporant to note that they use a different format for resumes (CVs).

My advice for anyone who is wondering about studying abroad in the semester while they are seraching for jobs, is to go for it. The path ahead will require a lot of research before you leave, and it will make things more complicated, but I definitely believe it is worth it. So many of my interviewers commented on how they loved their study abroad semesters, or wished they had gone abroad during their undergrad. I’m happy to report that I have accepted a full time offer, and have gotten to enjoy this semester to the fullest, even with the pressure of the job hunt!

The Class Structure in France

Never in my life did I think I would be able to sit still for 4 hours. The shock of the French system of classes is hard to take in when it varies so significantly from the American system. I had been used to taking a few classes a day for periods from an hour to two for the three years of my education. However, in France, the material is much more concentrated. We take one or two courses all day for 2 blocks of 3-4 hours. My easy days begin at 9am where I work till 12pm. Then, we have lunch for two hours, and class resumes from 2-5pm. We are usually lucky to get a 10minute break in this period, in which everyone runs to the coffee machine. The classes are mostly lecture based or group project based. There are a lot of group presentations throughout the class, and we are asked to evaluate one another on the spot. Our homework is generally reading chapters and cases, and I have yet to have any mathematical work. Additionally, my school, Audencia Ecole de Management, has a very special structure. For the first two weeks, we only take elective classes (1 or 2) and this tends to leave your schedule more open. However, afterwards the core or major classes begin. I am currently enrolled in the Consulting Major program which is one of the more rigorous and project oriented. The program is incredibly interesting, and I feel that I was able to learn a lot about the industry which I have never had much exposure to in Fisher. It is nice to apply the analytical skills we acquire throughout our classes at Fisher to the problems we are faced with. My class is composed of 2/3 international students and 1/3 French which also leads to a lot of interesting inputs and learnings. All in all, the Audencia classes have proved challenging but very valuable! We are presenting to a large consulting firm, Capgemini in just a few short weeks! I cannot wait for such an awesome opportunity.

This was my schedule for Week 4, within my Consulting Major

This was my schedule for Week 4, within my Consulting Major

European Destinations

If my last post was written in a state of culture shock induced delirium, this second post is written in a state of culture awe and relish. In the past two weeks, I have had the joy of visiting some of the world’s most famous and attractive cities: Paris, Dublin, London, and Amsterdam.

I was wowed by the utter difference among all the cities; the history, the people, the art, the architecture, the food, the landscapes, everything.


Paris is the most beautiful city I have ever seen. I wrote this sentence before seeing the other three cities, and I must say now it is debatable, though Paris is certainly stunning. Everywhere you look, every street you wander down, every building you gaze up at, is striking. Of course the chocolate, pastries, and bread are to die for (and I would, if I lived there to have them every day). The city is so French; not comprable to any other city in any other country. I am struggling to find words to describe it: charming, but at the same time elusive; hurried, but slow; uptight but relaxed; old, set in its ways, but so much young, vibrancy. I would love to go back and explore it more.



The skies. Dublin skies are the biggest, most-blue, most enveloping skies. The clouds are streamy, stringy, yet fluffy white caps on blue waves that are the crisp, clean, skies. The Dublin people are exceptional. They are welcoming, funny, carefree, and a joy to be around. They’ll thank you after every interaction even when you are the one who should do the thanking. Their self-effacing humor is charming, and, needless to say, the accents are delightful. Also, the food in Dublin is amazing. No, they do not consume only potatoes and other bland anomalies. We feasted on delicious lamb stews, soda bread, garlic burgers, Spanish food, butternut squash soup, and chicken pâté paired with apple compote (surprisingly good).

We were also able to visit a village just outside Dublin called Howth. It is one of the most endearing seaside villages. I want to retire there. We climbed to the peak and wandered down the hill that is the town, seaside views all-encompasing. In the distance was one a magical-looking isle before I’d only seen in movies. It was an enchanting afternoon.


I loved London. It reminded me most of the US (which I did not mind, as being away for 3 months will most certainly make the heart grow fonder). It is reminiscent of New York City, but concurrently nothing like it all. Again, the people are lovely. Even the metro system announcers are incredibly polite, letting passengers know to, “Please, mind the gap” when disembarking, and also making announcements just for the sake of letting people know all trains are in good service. It was interesting to see that a lot of Londoners are in fact not British. I heard many languages, accents, and the like, where I expected to be surrounded by posh “Dear boy”’s and “Cheerio”’s. The British ones, though, call everyone “Love” and wish you a “Cheers” on the constant.

It was lovely to be in London during the first signs of Spring. We were able to go to their gorgeous parks and see the first flowers blooming and (much to our terror) birds taking flight.

We paid a visit to the queen outside her castle. By visit, of course, I mean we (and hundreds of others) gathered at a safe distance outside her gates and took pictures of her accommodations completely unbeknownst to her majesty.

I would love to go back to the UK. We had to take hour-long bus rides to and from the airport through the country. The countryside is phenomenal. There actually are sheep grazing on rolling green hills and thatched-roof houses, like something out of a storybook.


Amsterdam was our “wildcard” city, if you will. We were originally not supposed to visit, but we messed up our ticketing to London, and had a few days to spare: why not Holland?

I am so glad we did.

Amsterdam is the Venice of Western Europe. 60 miles of canals weave throughout. There are over 1200 bridges and some 600,000 bicycles. It is, for lack of a better word: incredible. Someone else on the internet wrote:
“It may sound like a generic word to describe a place, but Amsterdam epitomizes what Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines as ‘too extraordinary and improbable to be believed.’”.

And it’s true.

Amsterdam is like a fairytale. The architecture is remarkably charming: townhouses, each one unique as the last, packed next to each other line bicycle-filled streets following meandering canals throughout.

Upside Down and Backwards: My First Week in France

Wow. I live in France now. This place is crazy. Not crazy like “OMG this is cah-rayyy-zayyy”, but crazy like EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT.

I don’t know why this took me aback so. I mean, I was more than prepared to deal with culture shock, and of course, I understood I would. But this week has been intense. I have created a list of all the differences (some, opposites) between my home country/state (the US/Ohio) and my host country.

1. The weather is the same here every. single. day. Wake up: cold, dark, probably rain. Lunch time: sunny, warm. Night: cold, dark, rain. This is not Ohio where Tuesday you’re laying out and Saturday wearing your parka.

2. There are no baggers at the grocery store. The clerk and all the people behind you literally watch you bag your items and you wonder why you bought so much. (AKA efficiency is not prized)

3. Oh! Another grocery thing: they have NO plastic grocery bags. You either bring your own or buy their reusable ones, so now I have 4 grocery bags . . . (My city, Nantes, prides itself on being one of the greenest cities in France).

4. THEY DO NOT EAT PEANUT BUTTER HERE. IT IS NOT A PRIORITY, AND I DO NOT UNDERSTAND THIS. You have to pay roughly 8 USD for a tiny jar of Skippy (the only brand they have). Where the PB should be in the grocery, all you see are shelves packed with Nutella and cookie butter.

5. This leads me to: everything is sweet! They put chocolate in everything, and I am 100% okay with it. I have become obsessed with this amazing dark chocolate chunk granola. It is really difficult to find a cereal without some kind of chocolate component. They have chocolate chip bread right there with the sandwich slices. They have chocolate yogurt, rows and rows of every kind of cookie/chocolate combination imaginable, and a truly sinful treat: chocolate stuffed croissants, or, pain au chocolat.

6. Their sandwich bread has no end pieces. So what does that mean? Do they make super long loaves of bread and just sell us sections of a loaf? Or do they throw away every loaf’s end pieces?? These are the things keeping me up at night . . .

7. Another food thing: the largest pack of lunch meat I can find has 4 slices. 4. What am I supposed to do, buy lunch meat every 2 days? What do they eat for lunch?? BAGUETTES. The stereotype is SO TRUE. People literally walk down the street eating baguettes. I did it. It was fun and yummy.

8. Their coffee is amazing. If you order a small black coffee. They give you the teensiest cup of espresso and a wafer. It literally woke my jet-lagged butt UP. It was also incredibly delicious, and I’d drink it every day if I was sure it wouldn’t give me a heart attack.

9. They sell their milk warm. It sits on the shelf like any other beverage. I’ve seen this before in other countries, but I just think it’s so weird.

10. They have pink toilet paper. (Yeah, I bought it)

11. Nothing is open past 7pm during the week or at all on Sundays. There is literally NOTHING to do on Sundays. Even our university closes.

12. They take 2 hour lunch breaks.

13. The people are quiet in public. It’s so quiet here. People rarely talk on trains or sidewalks. They dress in all dark colors and neither smile at you nor excuse themselves when obstructing another’s path. In class though, the students talk over the professor while he’s lecturing, and over each other when we present projects. It’s an odd juxtaposition.


That is what I’ve noticed so far. Mostly food/grocery related things. Oops.


Keep checking up on this blog; I will try to post weekly/biweekly depending on how many exciting things I have to tell you! Thanks for reading et au revoir!

“Unforgettable” Food in France…

These past few days, I travelled to France for the first time!  Everything in France is as beautiful as they say, the Eiffel Tower, and Versailles Palace just to name a few.  However, I had a very bad experience at the first restaurant my friend and I decided to go to.  There were quite a few people at the restaurant so we thought that it would be a good choice.  We sat down, ordered food, and ate every delicious bite.  The food came with a huge bowl of six different sauces, and as we almost finished our food, we noticed something we wished we hadn’t.

We sat right next to the cashier’s counter, so we noticed that every time the waitress returned a bowl of sauce, they did not throw the rest of the leftover sauce out.  Instead, they just added more sauce to the bowl, then handed it to the next customer.  My friend and I were rather grossed out, because if others ate as we did, then that meant they would have double dipped, as well as used their own spoons to scoop out the sauce.

In addition, I was told that drinks (juices and sodas) were free, however when I went up to pay for my meal, they charged me extra.  I was very frustrated because, I could not properly complain due to the language barrier, and I could not properly tell them my dissatisfaction with how they reused leftover sauces. I ended up paying what they wanted, and left angry.  I realized that as long as I have a language barrier, I would be more likely targeted for unpleasant things such as being ripped off, getting pick-pocketed, or even violence, just because it would be easier for them to get away with it.