Academic Culture at Bocconi University

The academic culture at Bocconi University is a little different to that of Ohio State University.  Bocconi University is ranked as one of the top Economics and Finance Institutions throughout all of Europe, and by the content and difficulty of their coursework, I would have to say they live up to their standards.  I am enrolled in classes they specifically assign for their exchange students, so my classes are taught in English and they are filled with students from around the world.  It is interesting to have students from so many different backgrounds all in one room.

Although this is a business school in Italy, we study how the financial markets and institutions work in the United States of America.  I think it is interesting that such a prestigious university from across the world studies the financial markets of America, and not so much of their own country.  I am thinking that this has to do with America’s dominant central role in the world economy.

Something else I thought was interesting was how Bocconi sets up their class structure.  As an exchange student, we have an option to either be an “attending student” or a “non-attending student”.  As an attending student, you have group assignments, and homework that count towards your final grade in addition to your final, and mid-term exams.  As a non-attending student, you are only graded on the final exam, and that is 100% of your grade.  You have no homework, group assignments, or anything.  The exam is just based on the textbook.

Overall, I am enjoying my experience as a student at Bocconi, because they have a very efficient office set up for exchange students to help them get around, and answer any questions exchange students may have.  Thus, because of them I had a very smooth admission process into the university.  In addition, the courses that I am studying are taught with professors who are genuinely interested in seeing their students succeed, so that makes learning much more fun and enjoyable.

Travel Lessons

Over the past two weeks during Bocconi University’s fall break, I have travelled to five different cities in 14 days.  I travelled to Paris France, Dublin Ireland, London Britain, Berlin Germany, and Rome Italy.  It has been quite an adventure, exploring different cities, beautiful architectures, delicious foods, and of course we can’t forget, figuring out public transportation.

Over the course of my traveling I have learned two very important lessons about traveling.  First lesson; it is the journey that matters, not the destination.  I travelled with a friend of mine, and we really got along well and we realized that it was more enjoyable to travel and spend time with each other than it was to reach the final destination point or tourist location.  The second lesson I learned was that it is okay to trust people, and share some laughter with strangers (but of course you have to be smart about it).  The world is usually not out to get you, so have fun with life as it passes you by.  Time is precious so laugh, live, and love.

Ireland, Land of Lush Green Pastures!

Recently I made a trip to Ireland, and it was absolutely beautiful.  At this point, I have traveled to France, London, Italy, and Berlin all of which had beautiful architecture and great food.  However from my personal experiences, buildings begin to look the same after some time, but there is something about nature that never gets old.  I think that is one of the two reasons I loved Ireland the most.  I traveled throughout Ireland’s beautiful countryside and it was as picturesque as Hollywood portrays.

Countryside of Ireland!

The landscape was incredibly green and had pastures of sheep and cows grazing on green grass.  There were ruins of medieval fortresses all over Ireland, which made this country seem like a land from fairy-tales.

Ancient Tombstone in Ireland built around 3000 BC

Medival Fortress built 3000 years ago

The other reason I loved Ireland was the community of strangers.  Although I did not know anyone there, the people were incredibly nice to me, and were genuinely interested in engaging me in conversation.  I made friends with guitarists at bars, and I was told traditional Irish folklore from strangers.  From my experiences Ireland is full of lush green landscapes, and friendly, cheerful folks!

District of Food and Shops in Ireland

“Unforgettable” Food in France…

These past few days, I travelled to France for the first time!  Everything in France is as beautiful as they say, the Eiffel Tower, and Versailles Palace just to name a few.  However, I had a very bad experience at the first restaurant my friend and I decided to go to.  There were quite a few people at the restaurant so we thought that it would be a good choice.  We sat down, ordered food, and ate every delicious bite.  The food came with a huge bowl of six different sauces, and as we almost finished our food, we noticed something we wished we hadn’t.

We sat right next to the cashier’s counter, so we noticed that every time the waitress returned a bowl of sauce, they did not throw the rest of the leftover sauce out.  Instead, they just added more sauce to the bowl, then handed it to the next customer.  My friend and I were rather grossed out, because if others ate as we did, then that meant they would have double dipped, as well as used their own spoons to scoop out the sauce.

In addition, I was told that drinks (juices and sodas) were free, however when I went up to pay for my meal, they charged me extra.  I was very frustrated because, I could not properly complain due to the language barrier, and I could not properly tell them my dissatisfaction with how they reused leftover sauces. I ended up paying what they wanted, and left angry.  I realized that as long as I have a language barrier, I would be more likely targeted for unpleasant things such as being ripped off, getting pick-pocketed, or even violence, just because it would be easier for them to get away with it.

 

Language Barriers

There is a stereotype about how Americans assume people from all around the world can and should speak English since it is the universal language.  As an American myself studying abroad in Italy, I would have to say I fit that stereotype.  I personally do not believe that people from other countries should automatically know how to speak English nor do I expect them to, but it is the fact that I did not try to learn any Italian prior to coming to Italy.

Before arriving in Italy, I was not concerned that language would be a great barrier to overcome, simply because I figured I could carry around an Italian phrase book and that all would be good.  And yes, I am still alive and have been able to travel around with minimal problems, so language was not a large issue of survival, but in terms of being able to grasp the full experience, knowing the language is crucial.

Many times, I would be in a museum or at a famous landmark and not know the significance or the history behind the beautiful artifacts and sculptures.  This is because many attractions are written out only in Italian, and I found this to be frustrating because buildings and sculptures all start to look the same if knowledge about that object is unknown.  However, I had no one to blame but myself.  Also, language is essential to any culture and because I did not know any Italian, I already missed out on great opportunities to explore new places, restaurants, and people.

Although not knowing a language is frustrating, I would have to say it was not all bad experiences.  Learning a language along the way is much more fun than learning it through books and classrooms.  Also, picking up the local language while abroad has helped me improve my problem-solving skills and non-verbal communication skills, and now I have more confidence in my ability to overcome barriers.

My with some Italian speaking friends helping me learn the language during my time in Italy

At least for next time, I know that before I travel somewhere for an extended period of time, I must learn the basics of the local language in order to maximize my experience abroad.

Getting Lost

Recently, I made a trip to Lake Como in Italy.  Lake Como is renowned for the beauty of their scenic landscape.  It is a lake surrounded by large hills that are right on the water’s edge, and gorgeous mountains in the distance.  Lake Como is about forty minutes by train from Milan, Italy so I, along with five other friends of mine, decided to travel there for a day trip and return by evening.

We all met up at the Milan Central Station, which is the main hub for trains coming to and from Milan.  From there we bought the train tickets at a ticket machine, and we had two options, to either pick the train that would leave in fifteen minutes or the train that leaves in an hour and a half.  We decided to pick the train that was going to leave in fifteen minutes, however, that ended up being a poor decision because we were incredibly rushed.  It took a while for the tickets to print and by the time we all got our tickets, we only had five minutes to find our train.  It was the first time any of us traveled by train so we did not know how to read the tickets or which train was ours.  In a frantic rush we tried asking people passing by in our broken Italian, and everyone we asked would point to a different train.  We heard the station bell ring for last minute passengers so in a panic we all decided to board the train nearest to us.

None of us knew if we were on the correct train or not until the ticket stamper came around asking for our tickets.  He looked at our tickets and was about to give us a fine for taking the wrong train!  In hopes to avoid a fine, we all blurted out the few words of Italian we knew, and him, realizing that we were all confused foreigners, told us that he wouldn’t fine us, but that we would have to get off at the next stop.

On the wrong train, but still smiling 🙂

So when we got off, we realized we were in the middle of the countryside and all we could do was wait for the next train.  The next train came about thirty minutes later and we were on the wrong train once again!  In total, we rode on three wrong trains, and almost got fined three different times, but finally we hopped on the right train the fourth time around.

Getting lost usually frustrates people, but for me, it was a positive experience. I not only learned that I should always plan ahead for my travels and my studies, but it also gave me an opportunity to strengthen my relationship with my friends.  There was something about struggling together that allowed us to trust each other and to know that we could depend on one another. Also, since we had a lot of time to waste while waiting for trains, it provided us the opportunity to have enriching conversations and grow in our understanding of each other.

We arrived at Lake Como about four hours later when it should have only taken forty minutes.  Lake Como was beautiful, but surprisingly, I enjoyed the journey to Lake Como more than the destination itself.  Trying to communicate with strangers about how to get to the proper train, solving problems together as a team, and trying our best to tear up when almost getting fined, were more memorable than picturesque mountains.  This has taught me to be flexible with plans because they can, and did go wrong, and to adapt well in any situation I find myself in.  I guess it is true what Ernst Hemingway once said.  “It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”

We finally arrive at Lake Como!
Lake Como was definitely beautiful

Food in Italy!

Food is unique all over the world, and although Italian food has become such a large part of American cuisine, there are a few differences in dining culture between Italy and America.

First and foremost, Italians love espresso.  I remember the first time I ordered coffee, I thought the cafe would have a regular Starbucks sized Americano or a regular black coffee, but they do not.  Instead, what they have all over Milan is a tiny tiny cup of espresso, or a small cup of cappuccino.  When I say tiny, I mean very tiny as shown in the picture below.  There are no Starbucks in Milan, and no gas station sized coffee.

Tiny Tiny espresso cup!

For lunch, sandwiches or pizza are popular options.  The pizza in Milan is delicious, and so cheap.  Pizza in Milan is quite different from pizza in America, because the toppings and texture is not the same.  Some common pizza toppings in Milan are basil, seafood, sometimes no cheese, mozzarella cheese, and so on and so forth, but never have I seen a pepperoni pizza yet.  The sandwiches in Milan are somewhat simple.  It is usually some sliced deli-meat with tomato, and some sort of cheese such as brie or mozzarella. Sandwiches such as cheeseburgers or any Subway chains are not common, and actually, I have not seen a burger place or Subway shop yet.

Margarita Pizza in Milan

For dinner, aperitivo is a popular choice.  Aperitivo is the Italian version of Happy Hour, but instead of getting just half off drinks, you get a drink of your choice whether that be Long Island, a cocktail, beer, etc with unlimited appetizer like food that is set out in a buffet style.  It is usually only 6 to 10 euros, and is delicious!

Aperitivo!

 

Beautiful Milan

During my first week in Milan, I traveled out to the center of the city.  When I say the center of the city, it is literally in the center of the city of Milan.  In the center, there is a main cathedral called the Duomo, which is a term used for church, more specifically a catholic church.  The Duomo is literally in the center of Milan.  Then from the Duomo, the city is built as a circle that radiates outward.  The structure of the city can be described as a small circle as its center point, and then a circle of buildings built around the center, and so on and so forth as it keeps radiating out.

The Duomo of Milan. It was absolutely stunning.  Of course this picture does not do it justice.

Above is a picture of the Duomo that I took from behind.  It is absolutely stunning.  The building is so large, with hundreds of handcrafted sculptures of famous disciples, and people described in the Holy Bible.  This church took about 600 years to build, and it is still under reconstruction (if you notice to roof of the building)!  I know from pictures it just looks alright, but it is similar to looking at a picture of the ocean, and actually going to the ocean; two very different experiences.

This is a picture of me about 100 meters from the entrance of Duomo. It is absolutely huge!

I was not allowed to go into the Duomo the day I took the picture above, because I was wearing shorts.  The entrance guards were really strict about what kind of clothing one could wear when entering the cathedral.  It was understandable, because they viewed this as a place to meet God, and they wanted people to wear respectable, very conservative clothing, so I have yet to still go inside, which I am sure is just as beautiful.  This small encounter with the entrance guards was a slight culture shock for me.  At my home church, which is a protestant church, I am allowed to wear whatever I please as long as it was socially appropriate, so shorts and a T-shirt would have been no problem back in many churches in the States, but here at this specific cathedral, they wanted people to dress better when entering a building of God.

Moving on from the Duomo, I was walking around taking pictures of everything around the center plaza and my friend was taking some pictures of me too when a man came from nowhere, just grabbed my hand, and put bird food into my hand (see picture below).

Getting hustled my first day in the center of Milan.

He lifted up my hand and walked away, and right after that, pigeons flew towards me and ate everything in a matter of a few seconds.  First, I hate pigeons…I sometimes see them as rats with wings.  And secondly, once the pigeons (although the picture has just one pigeon, about ten came) landed on my hands, I immediately thought of bird flu.  After that very unenjoyable experience, the man walked back towards me with another friend of his and he pointed to my hand and gestured for money.  He spoke to me in Italian but I understood what he probably said, which was something along the lines of, “You used my bird food and now I want my money from you”.  Him and his friend kept getting closer and kept asking for money so two thoughts flew into my head.  First, for some odd reason, I was quite enjoying this experience.  Maybe because it was the first time I got hustled and I was waiting to see how I would react.  Secondly, I was thinking that they chose the wrong girl, because if they knew anything about my father, they would have known that he has done a good job teaching me not to waste money, and I was sure not going to spend money on these guys. So I told them I did not have money.  They kept following me still so I said in a harsher voice, “I don’t have any money” and walked away (which was quite an obvious lie, since I had a very visible fanni-pack).  They followed me and kept gesturing for a couple minutes but I walked quickly and made sure I was by other people so they eventually gave up.  I know this situation could have been much worse if it was later in the night or if I was alone with not many people around but thankfully that was not the case.  After this experience, I noticed that there were so many people trying to hustle money from tourists or people who looked foreign.  I realized that just because I am Asian, I will probably be targeted more often than other people of Caucasian ethnicities because I will have a harder time “looking” like a typical European.  Also, it won’t help my case that Asians often come with the stereotype that we are all rich, and innocent…especially since I am a short Asian girl.  From this experience I learned to be more aware of my surroundings, to not let strange men give me bird food, and to not wear a fanni-pack around.

Near the central plaza of Duomo, there are hundreds of stores just around the corner selling beauty products, clothing, and accessories.  Milan did live up to its title as the “Fashion Capital of the World”.  There were several malls in which only designer products were sold.  Just below is a picture of a shopping mall that only sold designer products.  There were many expensive cafes next to the shops as well.  Some stores even had their own cafe such as with Gucci, in which they had their own Gucci cafe right outside their store.  The architecture of the mall was beautiful as you can see in the picture below.

This was a designer indoor/outdoor shopping mall right next to Duomo.

Of course I could not afford to buy anything, but I was happy to just walk around and take everything in.  It was a beautiful day, with blue skies, nice friends, and a lot of experiences,   with many more to come!

My Arrival Upon Milan

Shortly after I got off my plane, I found myself in Milan, Italy!  It was very exciting to realize that I was actually going to live in Milan for about four months.  I never lived outside of Ohio for very long, especially out of the country, and being in Italy was a good reminder that the world is a very, very big place.

Flying over Europe!

I got out of the airport and found many cabs waiting for me.  I did watch the movie “Taken” right before I came, so I made sure that I did not share my cab with any attractive European men.  Stranger danger I told myself.  Once I hopped in a cab, I gave the driver directions to my dorm, and shortly after we began talking.  He immediately knew I was from America because of my accent, and also because of how little Italian I knew.  I have to admit, it was rather embarrassing not knowing much, if any Italian, because I felt like I supported the stereotype that “Americans don’t care to learn other languages because they think everyone speaks English”.  Of course I don’t think that is true, but I am aware that it is a negative stereotype we bare.  But the driver didn’t seem to care too much, and I had a nice discussion with the cab driver.  He told me about the history of the Italian language, as well as the history of the city and how the city was built.  I was amazed at how much history there was to the Italian culture, and Milan itself.  Comparing the history of Italy which dates back from thousands of years, with America’s recorded history of only two-hundred years is quite a big difference.  Until now, I never really thought about how young United States was.

Next thing I knew, I found myself at Arcobaleno Residence, my dorm.  I was expecting there to be a very quick and organized sign-in system, however, I had to wait in line for about an hour while people ahead of me in line slowly filled out their paperwork.  I compared this with my move in experience at OSU.  At OSU, although there were thousands of new freshmen moving into the dorms, it was a very structured and organized process, that took very little time (in comparison with how many people were moving in).  This is one of many future instances where I realized that in Italy, it sometimes takes a long time to process and file things.  This is something I had to adjust to, because in America, everything seemed to get done much faster.