Job Hunting While Abroad

Searching for a Full Time job in the United States while abroad started out as perhaps one of the most difficult challenges I’ve ever had to face. As I entered my Consulting Major at Audencia Ecole de Management, I thought that I might want to pursue a career in consulting. While the major showed me that this wasn’t a field I wanted to enter into directly, it equipped me with a lot of great skills for presenting and case interviews.

Additionally, I applied for a few interviews via FisherConnect, and with the help of Mark Wilson from Fisher’s IT Department, was able to Skype interview from abroad. All of the interviewers commended Fisher for making it so easy for them, and I also appreciate the time they dedicated to ensuring my interviews went smoothly. It was nice to always see the familiar face of Mr. Wilson before I went forward with my interviews!

Overall, the process definitely had some added stresses, but Fisher’s resources made it much easier to apply and get in contact with companies. I also sought out a few companies outside of the ones that normally recruit at Fisher, and found the process to go smoothly. Some companies did request to send me back to the United Staes for a second round interview, which certainly made the process more difficult. Others, offered to interview me when I returned in December.

Audencia Ecole de Management offers a number of resources for job hunting, including resume reviews in both English and French. The school also has its own job fair, called the Audencia Forum, in early October. These jobs are typically in Europe, and more specifically, France. Currently, I would like to work in the States, so I neglected to attend. However, there were many top companies such as Ernst & Young, Amazon, and Unilever. If you are planning to apply abroad, it is imporant to note that they use a different format for resumes (CVs).

My advice for anyone who is wondering about studying abroad in the semester while they are seraching for jobs, is to go for it. The path ahead will require a lot of research before you leave, and it will make things more complicated, but I definitely believe it is worth it. So many of my interviewers commented on how they loved their study abroad semesters, or wished they had gone abroad during their undergrad. I’m happy to report that I have accepted a full time offer, and have gotten to enjoy this semester to the fullest, even with the pressure of the job hunt!

This is not meant to scare you!- EMGL Blog December 2nd, 2014

When the presenter starts with the disclaimer, “This information is not intended to scare you!” you know you are in for quite an interesting presentation. This is exactly what happened to the students of the EMGL to Manaus, Brazil yesterday evening. Dru Simmons, the International Risk Manager for The Ohio State University, came to our class to debrief us on all of the different scenarios we could encounter in Brazil; from the rare disease of chickengunya, a mosquito- born illness that is becoming more prevalent in South America, to alcohol and drug safety in Brazil. One would think this information would be dry and hard to sit through, but Simmons included a multitude of anecdotes that broke up the information and made it more extremely interesting. We learned about what the responsibilities of the Department of States Program are and what they are required to do in case there is an emergency in country. Simmons also advised us to dress down and not wear jewelry in public. To supplement this advice, Simmons illustrated how imperative it is when he told the short story of a woman who was being interviewed on the street of Rio about the street crime that was rampant there, and while she was in mid-sentence, someone came up and ripped the necklace right off of her neck!

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Simmons also encouraged us to invest in a money belt, so the money we carry on us is not visible to the public eye. Furthermore, he noted that there are a good number of credit card scams in Brazil, so we need to make sure we are monitoring our account while in- country to watch out for fraudulent activity. One of Simmons’ closing suggestions was to never ever under any circumstances leave a person behind. Even if they are being a drag or are not interested in what the group is doing, they should never be left alone. One point was made very clear in that the group sticks together.

As Simmons was wrapping up his spiel, Zach Grammel, the Program Coordinator for The Office of Global Business at OSU, jumped up to start his presentation about more specifics of our Brazil trip. He split the class into guy and girl groups as people exchanged curious looks thinking they were back at elementary school recess about to be selected for dodge ball teams- boys versus girls. It turns out that our task was to create a packing list in 3 minutes of exactly what we are going to take to Brazil. The girls came up with more items, but the boys ultimately won the challenge because they quantified what they are bringing i.e. two pairs of dress pants, three leisure shirts etc. Grammel expressed how small our flight would be by displaying a photo of the inside of the airplane and you could hear whispers throughout the room. Mr. Sword took this opportunity to urge the class not to be selfish and only bring one light suitcase, so no one would hold the class behind when we arrive in-country.

At the end of class, we went over some of the planned events that we will be doing in Brazil and after hearing about chickengunya diseases and high street crime rates for the last hour, one could visibly notice the morale of the students pick up. Everyone is very excited about the trip and some overly enthusiastic students even started a countdown on their phone. In case anyone was wondering, the Emerging Market Global Lab class to Brazil will be on a plane to the Amazon in 29 days 17 hours 1 minute and 10 seconds from this very moment!

Thankful- EMGL Blog November 25th, 2014

On Tuesday night, as the majority of the student population at Ohio State is gearing up for Mirror Lake jump or is already snuggled up by the fire at their house for Thanksgiving break, the students of the Emerging Market Global Lab class to Brazil are preparing for their last round of presentations. They welcome a surprise guest who was a past food export intern for Mr. Sword at the Ohio Development Service Agency. His name is Eric Krohngold and he now works for Oracle in Houston, Texas doing a myriad of tasks that involve information technology and software. He offered invaluable advice to the students about life after college and how to keep persevering until you land that first job. Krohngold also emphasized how important LinkedIn is for your professional life. “I thought LinkedIn was just for people who wore their cell phones on their belt buckle during high school, but I was wrong!” He told the class chuckling.

Students also took this opportunity to ask him questions about the interview process or what it was like transitioning from college life to “real-world life.” When asked why he chose to work for Oracle in Houston, Texas, he said, “Honestly, because it was the one job I thought I could not do. If you are not constantly learning and pushing yourself to do more, then you need to find a new job.” He commented on the interview process and mentioned that he glances at a candidate’s resume, but also focuses on who the person is as a human being. “Could I get along with them at the office? Do they have hobbies outside of work? These are key factors when choosing to hire someone.”

With our heads now full of wisdom from someone who has not only walked the walk, but has talked the talk, the final two groups prepare for their last presentation. The first group up was the 3-D printing group and they impressed the class with their silent video playing in the background showing the 3-D printer in action. Some comments they received at the conclusion of their presentation were that they were more nervous than in their previous presentations. They defended this remark by saying they cared so much about the project and had worked so hard at it that they wanted to perform well, which is very understandable. Mr. Sword also commented that some information seemed to be missing that was in previous presentations and they reasoned that they did not put this information in because they had said it in a previous presentation.

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The last group to go was the baby formula group. They started off with a skit in a grocery store with a baby doll trying to find the best baby formula. The feedback they got about this is that it is OK in a classroom setting, but would not bode well in an executive boardroom. They were also questioned about the competitor’s for their baby formula in Brazil. Were they American brands? Were they Brazilian Brands? The group struggled to give a clear answer and might have clouded the audience’s understanding even more. Some overall advice that was given to all of the groups was to have additional slides that you do not present, so when someone asks a specific question you can pull this slide up and show that you had thought about that very same topic. Also, another tip was to present the answer and then give the justification. If you keep justifying your reasoning throughout the whole presentation, then the answer is pretty anti-climatic.

At the conclusion of class when everyone was packing up to leave class and drive or fly home to visions of grandma’s homemade pecan pie and delectable green bean casserole, I know I speak for the whole class when I say, I am thankful for the experiences gained in the EMGL; dealing with ambiguous directions and learning not only how to absorb constructive criticism, but how to apply it and improve yourself in the future. The class can sleep easy in the coming days of break knowing that they can face critiques and move forward and for that I am eternally grateful.

A Numbers Game

The last Portuguese Language Lab was held tonight and it went over a useful topic: numbers. I began the class like any other and went over a scenario in which student would be shopping in Manaus and would need to greet the shop owner to ask him/her how much something costs.

Going over the conversation and telling the class what everything means.

Going over the conversation and telling the class what everything means.

I thought is would be a bit dry to teach students the numbers 0 to 100 by just writing them on the board, so I incorporated two Youtube videos which had a native speaker slowly enunciates each number while students repeated after her. In the first video for example, the speaker went over 0-20 which is usually the most challenging for learners because you need this base in order to say bigger numbers.

Youtube video detailing Portuguese numbers.

Youtube video detailing Portuguese numbers.

In order to encourage retention, I had my peers turn around from the board while they randomly tell me Portuguese numbers. Most of the time they found it easy to recite the numbers due to the similarities with Spanish (most students took Spanish in high school), but at times the pronunciation did confuse them. For example, the numbers três, quatro, cinco, and seis (three, four, five and six) have basically the same pronunciation as Spanish since they are both Romance languages, but there are some differences such as with sete, oito, nove and dez (seven, eight, nine, and ten).

Students practicing numbers as we go around the room.

Students practicing numbers as we go around the room.

The second video went over how to count from 20-100. It was simple because students only have to know the tens (20, 30, 40, 50, etc.) and the base numbers from 1 to 9 in order to form numbers. We practiced this by counting around the table from 0 to 100 as each person said one number. A number like 43 would be translated as “40 and three” or “quarenta e três“. After each video students were then able to go back to the conversation and practice saying something costing seventeen reals or “dezesete reais”.

After watching the video, I would go back to insert a random number and have volunteers practice using it at the "market".

After watching the video, I would go back to insert a random number and have volunteers practice using it at the “market”.

All in all, my experience as a Language Tutor was very beneficial. Not only was I helping to plan lessons and teach students what I knew, but I was able to review some concepts for myself. Those who were able to attend even one class were able to learn something that they would have otherwise never learned if they had not taken this Emerging Markets Lab course to Brazil.

A final treat of buckeyes as  students commemorate the last language lab.

A final treat of buckeyes as students commemorate the last language lab.

D- Day: EMGL Blog November, 18th 2014

Dun dun… dunn dunn… dunnn dunnn. This was the sound that was going through every EMGL students’ head at 5:27pm yesterday evening. The music to the Jaws movie was fitting because it was D-Day, the day of our final group export projects. The quick 5- minute presentations we have been giving every week for the past month of class pale in comparison to this mammoth final presentation. This presentation is required to be 15- 20 minutes or four times the length of our usual presentations.

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Everyone could sense a different energy walking into the classroom in Bolz Hall. This change was due to a combination of everyone being in “business professional,” the lack of sleep due to preparing for the presentation, the amount of other exams that just happened to fall on this Tuesday, and the frigid cold temperatures outside. Professor Sword could sense the anxiety in the room and acted quickly to reverse the energy. Less than a minute later, everyone in Bolz Hall could hear the beautiful musical intonations of the one and only Taylor Swift as she sang us the best advice to just “shake it off.” After the students took Swift’s advice, the parade of presentations began. First up was the air conditioning group. Throughout their presentations over the past month, they had been urged to increase their enthusiasm when presenting. All the students who have sat through their weekly presentations could sense a positive notable difference in their enthusiasm. At the end of their presentation, they were questioned on why they passed a template of an invoice around rather than just displaying it on the screen and were also probed about the break down of their numbers. Overall, they got solid feedback and set the bar high for the rest of the presentations.

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Up next was the latex glove group. In past classes, the audience had expressed concern over where they were going to sell their gloves and exactly what kind of glove they would sell. They did a nice job of clarifying the concerns by being very specific on what kinds of gloves they were going to export etc. They even added a talking point about culture considerations when doing business with another country, in particular Brazil. Some things that we learned were that it is rude to use the “aye okay” symbol and that women should dress more feminine in the workplace than they do in the United States. They also received positive feedback, but some suggestions that were made included more eye contact with audience, stand closer to the audience and get rid of notes because they are an unnecessary clutch.

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After the latex glove group, the Luna Burger group was up to bat. They had a very visually appealing PowerPoint and reached out to a variety of different business people to enhance their presentation. When it came time for feedback, the comments were not all peaches and cream. Some criticisms were that it was four mini presentations in one that were not coherent with each other. As the saying goes, “it is not personal, it’s just business.” This feedback was not to insult the group, but to encourage them to improve. We cannot be “fired” from this class, but we can learn from our mistakes and improve so that we do not make the same errors when we are giving “real” presentations in the “real world.”

Team Voldemort & Team Dumbledore

A major improvement can definitely be seen among students in the fourth Portuguese class. I began the class like any other night with a conversation, but instead of moving on to a new topic, I reviewed the previous half of the hypothetical restaurant conversation so we could practice the entire dialogue thoroughly.

Leading the vocabulary review

Leading the vocabulary review

Though attendance was lower than usual, it allowed for more individual attention among students. In fact, all students were at one point able to come up to the front of the class and pronounce all the phrases written on the board while I interrupted once in a while to correct errors.

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I spiced things up with a game in which two teams formed to put together words on pieces of paper to form the phrases we have been learning the past month. I would switch up between English and Portuguese so that students would have to try thinking in each language. For example, if I said “Where is the bathroom?”, they would have to find the words “Onde“, “Fica“, “O”, and “Banheiro” and then raise their hands before the other team.

"Team Voldemort" looks for their complete phrase during a round of the game.

“Team Voldemort” looks for their complete phrase during a round of the game.

Teams became quite competitive and it made language learning fun because if one person was not sure of the answer, they would work together to form the sentence structure. The game ended in a tie and afterwards I felt that combining words already available to people may be more effective than asking for rote memorization. Perhaps students would have an idea about what phrases “looked familiar”, but not necessarily remember them from memory. I believe just that familiarization is important for beginning language learners.

"Team Dumbledore" in discussion

“Team Dumbledore” in discussion

Continuing Adventures in Ireland

Since my last post about my stay here at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland I have had so many new experiences worth talking about it’s hard to pick just one. In my last post, Irish students had just moved in, school activities were just starting, and classes were getting underway. My courses are not so different from my experience in the states; I have lectures and tutorials (smaller group recitations) each week for classes. The biggest difference is in the actual work for each course. In many of them the workload is focused into a few heavily weighted assignments, which is unlike my experience in the states where I have many more assignments that help alleviate weight on the final. Most of the time the only grade is a final exam (all of which are taken in May) and possibly a smaller assignment in the first term. Students only staying for the fall term have a substitute assignment, usually an essay, due just before term break. I should be starting my essays soon.

Somewhere between my classes I found some time to do some traveling in Ireland and do something special that I don’t think many people get to experience. First off, one of the reasons I chose Ireland to study was because my family is predominantly Irish. I knew my family history back to my maternal great grandmother who was the first to come to the US from Ireland in the early 1900’s. When my grandfather heard where I was going he jumped at the opportunity to visit me on the condition that we try and meet our relatives. We did some research and found his cousin living in the south of Dublin outside of county Cork in a small town called Rosscarbery. She said she would be happy for us to visit and said she would let the family know we were coming. So when my parents and grandparents got to Ireland we traveled south not knowing exactly what to expect when we got there.

Arriving in Rosscarbery we got a picturesque view of the town across the bay. We met my grandfathers cousin and she led us to O’Driscoll’s, a pub my family still owns and runs. There we were greeted with an unexpectedly large number of family members, some of which were meeting each other for the first time as well. One of the first people we met was my grandfather’s 94-year-old step uncle. It was really incredible seeing these two men (pictured below, my grandfather is on the right) meet for the first time and talk like they had been friends for years. I had never seen my grandfather so excited. While there we discussed our family history and when all the heads were put together we were able to fill in the family tree as well as extended it an additional four generations back from my grandfather.

On a cultural note, I said before that we were in O’Driscoll’s, my family’s pub. Today, a pub is synonymous with a rustic bar, but the word is actually short for public house, which is more than a place to get a pint. They were used as community centers for rural towns where people of all ages were welcome. O’Driscoll’s is reminiscent of this original style of pub. We were there on a Saturday and in the evening local families started to wander in. Mothers sat around and chatted, children played games in the corner, and fathers and older sons played darts and rings with surprising talent. I tried my hand at both and found the matches were uneven considering our opponents were the local champs. This was truly a pub in the original sense; it was a social center for the largely rural community. The place felt more like a home then a bar. The community feel reminded me of my own town where families would meet on porches on the weekend to socialize. Being able to go there with my grandfather and experience my own personal history was incredible and be in an original pub was one of the highlights of my trip so far and something I am really grateful to have had the opportunity to do. IMG_4518  IMG_0657_copy (1)

Restaurants and Repetition

So last week was the third class, making my official halfway mark as a Student Tutor for my peers. The topic of the day was ordering food at a restaurant and talking about allergies. I believe that this was a useful yet tough topic to teach as there were many new vocabulary words that I was trying to get across.

Me showing the class the next conversation and later having to cut it in half to allow for the words to set in.

Me showing the class the next conversation and later having to cut it in half to allow for the words to set in.

But with the limited time of only 45 minutes per class, I found it challenging in this session particularly to express all definitions and meanings so that students could understand them and apply them in the future. I had to continuously repeat words and answer any questions on pronunciation for any students.

Some students actually take notes! It makes for conducive learning outside of class.

Some students actually take notes! It makes for effective learning outside of class.

One thing I found interesting was that depending on the student and their background, there would be difficulties that they experienced more. For example, two students originally from China had some trouble with words that involved “R” sounds and would instead make an “L” sound in a word like frango (chicken). Each student has their strengths and weaknesses, so it is to my benefit to identify what those are and work to improve them through the short time I have.

Students turned around to be tested on class material.

Students turned around to be tested on class material.

Class ended with students turning around from the board to be tested on the vocabulary and phrases we have been learning for the past three weeks. I called students to say “No, I don’t have allergies” for example, and they would then have to state the phrase “Não, não tenho”. After receiving feedback after the class, a better approach moving forward would be to ease up on straight repetition and ensure that everyone actually knows the material.

Such excitement in their faces.

Such excitement in their faces.

What even is it? : EMGL Blog November 4, 2014

“What actually is an emerging market?” One would think that undergraduate students at The Ohio State University would be able to spew out this definition in their sleep, but this simple question proved to be deceptively challenging to answer. When I tried to find a concrete definition of how an emerging market is actually defined, it was more difficult than I anticipated. All of the sources had varying answers that were pretty ambiguous. Some definitions included “an emerging market is in a transitional phase toward a developed-market (i.e., industrialized) status and in the process of building liquid equity, debt and foreign-exchange markets” to “an undeveloped country with high-growth potential, in tandem with high risks and significant market volatility” to “having economic activity stronger than a least developed country but generally weaker than a developed country.”

While the definitions range from vague to “vaguer”, so did the students’ answers to hot seat questions in the EMGL class. Students grappled with how to concretely define what an emerging market is and where one draws the line and says the country is no longer “emerging.” Students protested that the term “emerging market” is too general for a country and should be applied to “emerging” regions in a country instead of the country as a whole. For example, China is still considered an emerging market even though it has very developed cities such as Shanghai and Beijing.

Students in the hot seat

Students in the hot seat

For the past month, our EMGL classes have been dominated by student groups giving presentations to the class about specific considerations when exporting a product to Brazil and guest speakers who are experts in a particular industry such as lawyers from Kegler Brown or Mr. Locker from The Ohio Department of Transportation. While the past few weeks have taught the students invaluable skills from how to give an effective presentation to how to acquire solid information and network with superiors, this week was a change in pace that was definitely needed.

This weeks’ class was named “town hall” where 3 students would go up to the front of the room and sit in the “hot seat” while Mr. Sword asked questions from the back of the room. This exercise was completely opposite to what we have been doing so far. Every other week, people knew what they were going to say and how they were going to say it. With the hot seat questions, preparation was not allowed much to the students’ chagrin. After the students in the hot seat gave their perspective, other students in the audience were allowed to weigh in on the specific question. This made the discussion more cohesive and collaborative where all students participated and were permitted to give their uncensored, but still professional opinion. Topics that were discussed ranged from how a company would market organic makeup in Brazil to how a domestic company in the United States would go about exporting potato chips to an interested international buyer.

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It was fascinating to hear everyone’s perspectives on each of the various topics because all of the students are coming from very diverse backgrounds such as China, Kansas, New Jersey and Ohio. There are students ranging from sophomores to fifth- year seniors and with that comes differences in base knowledge about the various subjects discussed. Some might see this as a disadvantage or a tough learning curve, but it has been extremely valuable to be at different stages in our education because each person is taking different classes from Intro into International Business to the highest-level finance course. Sometimes the most beneficial learning does not occur when reading an 800- page textbook or taking a 100 question multiple-choice scantron exam, but by dissecting what one has learned and applying it to real life scenarios even if it is organic makeup or potato chips.

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Exploring Italy

One of the greatest parts about a semester abroad is the opportunity to see the world. Fortunately, the exchange student network (ESN) at Bocconi makes it easy to do so.

The first weekend of the school year we took a day trip from Milan to Lake Como. I had not even heard of Lake Como prior to this, but was immediately blown away by the beauty of it all. From walking through the quaint streets surrounding the lake to riding a “funicolare” up the mountain for amazing views, it was all very well organized and included in the trip.

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This past weekend, we took a trip to the Tuscany region. Four cities (Siena, Florence, San Gimignano, and Pisa) over 3 days, and it was a cultural and historical dream. Tuscany is known for the finest wine in the world, as well as the birthplace of the Renaissance. It was amazing to get a guided tour through each city from ESN members from that area, and walking through the neighborhood Michelangelo lived and worked in was a great experience. I know that it would have been very challenging to fit so much into a weekend without the benefits of ESN, and am glad that these types of trips are made available exclusively for exchange students. More travels to come.

O-H!

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