Top 5: Designs of Denmark

Finance student and Sustainable Business Global Lab participant, Zack Wells, shares which buildings top his list of innovative Danish design.

In U.S. cities like Cleveland or Los Angeles, an intricate Frank Gehry rooftop will decorate the occasional intersection, but a good portion of American architecture seems to jostle between minimalism and utilitarianism.

I was delighted to find in Copenhagen however that the streets were lined with warrens of large apartment buildings and businesses alike, each uniquely taking on striking, almost fashionable designs. It’s true that the city is industrious and respectful of tradition, home to several palaces like Amalienborg which houses the Danish royal family, all to be seen from guided canal tours. Yet in other avenues Copenhagen displays airs of playfully fresh designs that are as “modern” as anything you’d find in New York or Paris. In some cases these structures are so lively and numerous that one begins to wonder if they are naively overabundant; rather, it’s likely they are the result of a few generations of ambitious people in Denmark who are fully committed to designing societal solutions that are creative, clever, and even lucrative.

Here are some of the most attractive and bewildering works of architecture & design I saw while in Denmark:

 

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8 Topple – This apartment complex in Ørestad has a classic courtyard with inward facing balconies but also features two converging slopes that run from rooftop to ground level, and host a number of different types of grass; this type of “green” architecture attempts to support and enmesh itself into local ecosystems and it’s springing up all over, especially in Scandinavia.

 

 

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Tietgenkollegiet – We came across this student residence hall while roaming a lively Copenhagen campus. Its plan looks like a large circle with a courtyard inside, and its outer façade hoists and juxtaposes idiosyncratic apartment units with sleek wood paneling and community terraces.

 

 

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Amager Bakke (Amager Slope) – While this project is still under construction, our group got a good glance at what the finished product will look like, and even saw what work has been done on it already (physically it looks more than halfway complete). This futuristic, nauseatingly large slope will efficiently burn trash underneath, capturing most of the C02 fumes – on top, however, locals can ski down the slope or scale the 300 foot rock wall on its side (Google this one).

 

 

Autumn in the Dome of Visions.

Dome of Visions – located in Copenhagen harbor, we saw this little structure on a breezy canal tour. It’s a transparent dome with pieces of breathable, recyclable, polycarbonate triangles tessellated across its surface. It contained enough live vegetation or some type of plant matter when we saw it, that the site was visibly green from the harbor – this is no surprise, as the dome functions as both a space for art, music, and cultural showcases as well as a discussion space for future sustainable housing projects.

 

American industry has a lot to learn from places like Copenhagen and regarding our own sustainable practices, perhaps going back to the design phase is where we might focus our efforts. Some of the zaniest concepts and buildings might find themselves replaced with more fitting solutions as time passes, but artfully creative thinking and brainy designs are what the world needs from sustainable businesses.

What Comes Next? Life after Sustainable Business Global Lab

Senior Colleen Magee reflects on how her time in Denmark and The Netherlands continues to shape her life and future career in sustainability.

Returning home from Denmark and The Netherlands, I felt re-inspired to help bring sustainability to the corporate world. Everyone I met on Sustainable Business Global Lab was driven and fun, the business sites were unique and informative, and the guest lectures at other international schools were enlightening. The confidence I felt returning home made me into a go-getter.

So what did I do once I came home?

Went straight to my internship eager to learn and also give back. After two weeks at my internship, I saw an opportunity to present to the company I interned with, IGS Energy, on Sustainability and Sustainable business. Long story short, that’s exactly what I did this summer, applied what I learned abroad, back home in a professional manner. I approached my manager with an idea that I felt would be extremely useful for the company, and immediately was given support. Then I created a presentation about sustainability, presented in 3 separate sessions to a classroom of 18 professionals and received incredible feedback, scoring letters of recommendation from my study abroad professor and my internship manager who highlighted on my project. The inspiration I felt coming home, gave me the courage to follow through with this project, which ended up being an amazing experience that aided my growth as a professional.

One more perk to this Global Lab, the food is awesome…especially the breakfast.

What you can take from my story? Study abroad, but more importantly, go on a trip that will inspire you to be successful in your future career. This trip was highly engaging, and offered cutting edge information that’s not always an available resource on campus. Take it from me that Sustainable Business Global Lab helped me become a much more driven and knowledgeable individual in my field.

Private Thoughts: A Question of Motivation

Alex Rhodes, junior in Public Policy Analysis & Political Science, gains new appreciation for private sector profit maximization in the decision making process during his participation in the 2016 Sustainable Business Global Lab.

As a student studying public policy, I must admit I was quite interested in the implication of public actors in achieving the level of sustainability that I and many others had presumed Denmark and The Netherlands to have. I believed that private actors, or firms, were quite limited in their ability to widen the scope of their analysis of their own functions to incorporate or internalize negative externalities like pollution. I was taught that it is often only the government that can force businesses to consider the environment.

I was entirely mistaken.

Certainly the role of government cannot be overlooked. When we went to Aalborg University, several presenters fused sustainability ideas with application of public policy. We discussed a previous project one of presenters had worked on: a public biking path. We discussed how a cost benefit analysis of the path was created, how the argument for its construction was created and changed throughout the process of its enactment, and we learned how its effectiveness was statistically measured and analyzed. It was one of the most interesting discussion lectures I’ve attended in my undergraduate career.

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SBGL students visit SolaRoad, the first road surface that absorbs sunlight and converts it into electricity.

However, I soon realized I hadn’t given enough credit to potential of the private sector. I realized that under very unique circumstances, circumstances like those experienced by Kalundborg Symbiosis Eco-Industrial Park, firms can create radically innovative business models with sustainability and profitability to boot.

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SBGL students on a tour of Kalundborg Symbiosis Eco-Industrial Park, an industrial network where companies collaborate to use each other’s by-products.

The Eco-Industrial park consists of a host of factories and firms that have assembled themselves in one location based off of one principle: their inputs are the same another’s outputs, or vice versa. That means less dumping of waste materials into landfills, less pollution from trucks transporting waste material to its resting place, etc.

But don’t mistake this park as being created to be “green”; I quickly learned after arriving that it was created almost solely for monetary reasons. Having only to ship outputs/inputs of a factory down a street instead of across a city means less cost to the business. These businesses just wanted to add a few more dollars to their bottom line. Surprisingly, similar to American businesses, the most sustainable businesses in the country I once recognized as one of the most eco-friendly countries didn’t prioritize the environment in their business model; they just wanted an easier way to maximize profits.

I truly believe that there must exist a catalyst to speed up the creation of unique circumstances that lead to profitable and relatively environmentally-friendly businesses. Perhaps due to their nature, businesses will always prioritize profits. They may just need to augment how they go about earning their profits. Perhaps the government can help them do this.

What to Expect from 2017 SBGL

In preparation for his 2017 program, Dr. Neil Drobny reflects on his experience directing the 2016 Sustainable Business Global Lab in Denmark and The Netherlands.

The opportunity to develop and lead the Global Lab in sustainability is one of the highlights of my teaching career at Ohio State.  And the decision to concentrate the experience on sustainable business practices in Denmark and The Netherlands was icing on the cake.

I have known for many years that physical, cultural and other factors in Europe have intersected to create conditions ripe for innovation and development of sustainable business practice.  The Global Lab experience was an opportunity to validate and observe what I had come to know only through reading and second hand information.  Similarly it was an opportunity to reinforce with students information that I had presented in the classroom.

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During their time in Rotterdam, 2016 SBGL students met with representatives of Unilever to discuss the implications of sustainability in new product development.

The mix of visits to diverse business and cultural sites worked well together in conveying that sustainable practices are well integrated into everyone’s work and non-work lives.  We learned for example from Unilever, whose world headquarters in Rotterdam we visited, that an early consideration of all new product development is what the sustainability benefits and footprint will be.   If a new product idea does not score well on sustainability metrics, it is not pursued.

In Amsterdam we saw the world’s first (experimental) solar road, a roadway with solar cells built into it.  At this point it carries only bicycles and very lightweight vehicles, but there is every reason to believe that the technology will someday be incorporated into major roadways.  It was like visiting with Thomas Edison in his lab as he worked on the first light bulb

In Copenhagen we saw the benefits of sustainability-driven thinking in city planning.  In the older part of the city building height was limited to five stories and streets were exceptionally wide. With a latitude comparable to southern Alaska, sunshine is limited.  The wide streets and limited building heights enhance the penetration of sunlight in the urban core which is well-established as a key ingredient to overall well-being and productivity.  Today the wide streets help with accommodating bicycles and street cars in addition to automobiles and pedestrians.

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Interior of Pilgrim Fathers’ Church – a church in Rotterdam where passengers of the Speedwell departed for America in 1620.

Seeing the robust construction and results of careful maintenance of a 600-year old church in Rotterdam underscored that in the region things are “built to last” – a key element of sustainability.  Considerable interest was also added by the fact that the church was where the Pilgrims stayed the night before they “shoved off” for their voyage across the Atlantic.

For 2017 we will build on the success of the 2016 program by adding a visit to Lund University in Sweden and working with visit hosts to fine tune visits in coordination with course material in advance of the trip.

Design Like the Danes

In studying the successful sustainability of Denmark and The Netherlands, Robin Iritz got a lesson in design theory with FCOB’s Sustainable Business Global Lab.

A culture of thoughtfulness sits behind every feature in Copenhagen, Denmark. The same can be said for Rotterdam and Amsterdam in The Netherlands. I traveled these cities in May 2016 as one of 25 climate-conscious Buckeyes. We observed innovative design at each carefully planned city corner.

In the US, sustainability is still securing its legitimacy as an essential consideration in our evolving communities. In Northern Europe, it’s always been in the culture. Our group visited seven influential businesses and universities with the goal of understanding how Europe continuously tops the environmental and social well-being charts. Put simply, what makes these guys so good at solving complex public problems?

It’s all in the design.

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2016 SBGL students at Nordic Food Lab testing a grasshopper-based soy sauce alternative.

It seems as though Danish and Dutch cultures are focused on doing things absolutely right. Everything right. Objects, traffic patterns, personal interactions, all of it is designed with a specific purpose and function. Our group understood this at the Nordic Food Lab in Copenhagen where the principles of sensory experience, functionality, and reflection were presented as important features of successful product-service experiences. This kind of design theory can be applied to any product, service, and professional interaction to create a meaningful experience. At Nordic Food Lab, it was applied to distilling grasshoppers into a nutrient rich soy sauce alternative.

We saw design again in the rapidly developing island Amager in Copenhagen where sustainable architecture is absorbing population growth and minimizing the environmental impact of greater population density. We saw design in incredible works of art throughout the many museums we toured in our free time. Design shined from the steel bridges crossing the river and canals in Rotterdam. The bridges are designed to look like the ships passing through Europe’s busiest port city.

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2016 SBGL students tour facilities at Amager Ressource Center (ARC) in Copenhagen, Denmark.

My friends and I spent nights in hotel lobbies trying to figure out how to make sustainability as attractive in America as it was in our host cities. After tossing around ideas of flashy advertisement campaigns and political calls to action, we realized that nobody ever “sold” sustainability to the Scandinavians. Rather, it developed there out of geographical conditions, availability of natural resources, and a culture of collectivism. To instill such values quickly in Americans is a lofty endeavor. However, I think that our constraints are changing as a result of climate change and social and political pressure. The changing environment could catalyze innovative technology and community development in such a way that we develop our own brand of sustainability. What American Sustainability will look like is up to how we understand and adapt to our unique challenges.

Understanding the European’s approach to sustainable design has taught me how to deconstruct a problem and build the solution from its parts. Their responses to ever-changing limitations are at once inspired, effective, and efficient. My time in Europe was eye opening and a total blast. (Did I mention how well designed the nightlife is?) I couldn’t bring the culture of sustainability home but what I bring back to OSU this fall is a new point of view and a cool group of peers who know what it’s like to glimpse into the future.

Going Global with Fisher

Welcome to the Fisher Global Experiences blog. The Office of Global Business (OGB) is a resource to undergraduate and graduate students with the intention of enhancing the educational experience through international experience and exposure. In doing so, students will gain the knowledge and skills eagerly sought after by employers in today’s global marketplace. Students participating in OGB programs will write here about their experiences at Fisher and around the world.

Interested in one of Fisher’s global offerings?

One unique opportunity available to first year FisherDirect students is the Freshman Global Lab. This program enables students to study abroad during their first year at The Ohio State University by traveling to four compelling centers of commerce—the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany.

As Fisher students enter their second year, they gain the opportunity to attend short-term study programs that can also provide academic credit to their major. The Emerging Markets Field Study is one such opportunity that gives students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of business opportunities in developing economies, and prepares them to conduct business in foreign markets.

The Green Business program is another short-term program that provides students the opportunity to examine the initiatives of organizations that have integrated sustainability-focused business practices into their operations. The course looks at the business scene from the perspective of indigenous entrepreneurs, multinational operations, and Costa Rica based companies.

Semester-long Student Exchange is undoubtedly the best immersion experience an undergraduate can have abroad at Ohio State. The Office of Global Business has established the partnership that allows students to learn at top global institutions without paying the extra tuition and earning transferable-credit for their major.

Students can gain global work experience and valuable cultural awareness during Fisher’s Global Summer Internship Programs located in countries that are strategic to international business.  Locations currently include Australia, England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Singapore. The internships are eight weeks in length and are selected specifically chosen to compliment the strengths, abilities, and interests of the Fisher student-intern.

Students who still hope to gain global skills and competencies in a paid internship now have the opportunity to so right here in Ohio through the Export Internship Program (EIP).  EIP features a small, specialized export-focused course during the Spring Semester with a twelve week summer internship placement with a small to medium Ohio business looking to increase their exports.

Graduate students have the option of participating in the new Global Applied Projects Program (GAP). GAP students  gain international experience by working on a business challenge with one of Fisher’s corporate partners.  GAP combines a Spring Semester second session international strategy course and a May term global project with a major client designed to differentiate your work experience.