Quietness in the Modern City

Tokyo is known as a modren city in Asia and even in the whole world. Long before I arrived here, I was expecting the life in Tokyo would be in rapid pace. But when I actually experience the life here, I just found out that the quietness of life in Tokyo is really enjoyable.

Every morning, I was walking from my dorm to Shiki Station to take Densya. When I pass through the street, I can feel the atmosphere of leisure conveyed from other people. It does not imply that everyone is quite relaxed, of course. People in Japan are very hard-working. What I meant is that people are really enjoying their life, even though they have to try hard in their work or study.

Sometimes I can hear people greeting their acquaintance on the street, or saying “Hi” to their familiar store owners. And the way they are talking is not like western-style, such as speaking very loudly or giving a hug to others. They always speak in a relatively low voice and very politely. And my Japanese friends also act in this way. I am also changing my greeting-style gradually. Instead of running to my friends as I always did, I’m now rather smiling to them firstly and waiting until we walk toward each other closer, then we start to talk.  But this way that people are communicating with each other never makes me feel we are more distant. This “quieter” way of communicating can also strengthen our friendship, and sometimes a smile can convey more and people can feel more even if we do not say  a lot of things.

I think this is not just because of the differences between the east and the west. Rather, it is more about Japanese people’s life attitude and the Japanese social culture. And I am really enjoying and appreciating this quietness in Japan, because it tells that even in the modern city like Tokyo, I can still feel the warmth conveying from others.

 

 

Creativity in Singapore

Last week during my Current Issues in Business, Culture, and Society class, a very interesting speaker came in to give a talk.  Randolf Arriola, a Singaporean musician spoke to our class about the importance of creativity.Randolf is known for his experimentation with loops music. He plays with a guitar and attached is a machine that can record the music the guitar plays and then play it back through the sound system. Randolf layers sounds on top of each other so that it comes together to create the illusion of a one-man band. It was an extraordinary thing to see him play. You can watch one of his recordings here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJvTT-x8ZAI

After his performance of a few songs, he explained why he thought creativity is lacking in Singapore. Randolf argued that creativity is lacking in Singapore’s society and economy because the culture was first built on effectiveness. Singapore is still a young country (only 50 years old!) and for it to become of the best cities in the world to live in (in terms of safety, health insurance, economy), the culture was geared towards effectiveness rather than creativity. Singapore is a city of rules. Or should I say, a city of fines. People like to stick to the familiar instead of risk-taking (Singaporeans are pretty high on the risk-aversion scale). The arts are considered inferior compared to science and math and people are encouraged to stick to a structure in the workplace (things that a local student told me about). Randolf also argued that in order for Singapore to compete in the 21st century, it would have to become a more creative and innovative society.

This is a big difference compared to the US, as Americans are supposed to be embedded with the spirit of entrepreneurship. Creativity and innovation is the backbone of American businesses and this talk made me more aware of it. To me, this always just seemed …obvious. As if creativity and innovation were fundamental parts of any country’s culture and society (which I now realize is not true).

It made me realize that working abroad could have a lot more implications than I originally thought, (I’m relating this to working abroad because it’s something I’ve thought about and is one of the reasons I wanted to go on exchange). Not only would you have to get used to the culture, you would also have to learn to adapt to a completely new work culture. My friend told me that Singaporean businesses like things to be done in a certain way and there’s very little freedom in how you complete your work because they are so focused on doing it the most efficient way possible. Compared to the US, I think people in the workplace are usually given more freedom, given that they get the results their boss wants.

This doesn’t discourage me from wanting to work abroad however, in fact it makes me even more curious.

 

Food in Italy!

Food is unique all over the world, and although Italian food has become such a large part of American cuisine, there are a few differences in dining culture between Italy and America.

First and foremost, Italians love espresso.  I remember the first time I ordered coffee, I thought the cafe would have a regular Starbucks sized Americano or a regular black coffee, but they do not.  Instead, what they have all over Milan is a tiny tiny cup of espresso, or a small cup of cappuccino.  When I say tiny, I mean very tiny as shown in the picture below.  There are no Starbucks in Milan, and no gas station sized coffee.

Tiny Tiny espresso cup!

For lunch, sandwiches or pizza are popular options.  The pizza in Milan is delicious, and so cheap.  Pizza in Milan is quite different from pizza in America, because the toppings and texture is not the same.  Some common pizza toppings in Milan are basil, seafood, sometimes no cheese, mozzarella cheese, and so on and so forth, but never have I seen a pepperoni pizza yet.  The sandwiches in Milan are somewhat simple.  It is usually some sliced deli-meat with tomato, and some sort of cheese such as brie or mozzarella. Sandwiches such as cheeseburgers or any Subway chains are not common, and actually, I have not seen a burger place or Subway shop yet.

Margarita Pizza in Milan

For dinner, aperitivo is a popular choice.  Aperitivo is the Italian version of Happy Hour, but instead of getting just half off drinks, you get a drink of your choice whether that be Long Island, a cocktail, beer, etc with unlimited appetizer like food that is set out in a buffet style.  It is usually only 6 to 10 euros, and is delicious!

Aperitivo!

 

School Starts! New life in Japan.

Rikkyo’s fall semester starts relatively late, and it was September 23rd. Thanks to that, I was given enough time to get myself used to the new life in Japan and also explored interesting things around here. Actually, I am not unfamiliar with what Tokyo is like and how life in Japan would be, because I have been watching Japanese dramas and animations for several years.

When I finally got here, I just found out that my life will be more exiting that I thought before. The first “challenge” that I met in Tokyo was that I have to take Densya (It is a public transportation similar to subway) to get to Rikkyo University everyday. My dormitory is actually in Shiki, which is about 25 minutes Densyaride away from Ikebukuro where the university is located. And I had firstly to figure out which line to take and remember the pronunciation of the names of the station where I need to got off. This was a big task for me because even though I could recognise the Kanji’s (similar to Chinese characters), they have really different pronunciations between Chinese and Japanese. And since Ikebukuro Station is a big and crowded station, every time I wanted to take Densya, it was really hard for me to find out which platform I should go to.

This challenge is tightly related the cultural shock that Japan gives me. I am Chinese, so I can read nearly all the Kanji’s shown outside. But the meanings of Kanji’s are also different from Chinese. Now, when I read Kanji’s in Japan, especially the name of stations and Densya lines, I automatically arrange myself in to three steps: read the Kanji’s, memorize the characters in Chinese, and then memorize the pronunciation in Japanese.

People in Japan are really really polite. When I go to convenience stores or other places, the sales person there are talking to me in KeiGo, which is a highly formal way of speaking. I was not very accustomed to it, so I just kept saying “Thank you very much” to them. As for the business part, I think the courses here can serve as a great example. I registered for two Research Seminars and a course named Bilingual Business Project. The reason why I mention these three courses is that we will be working on real business projects in these courses. For instance, in the Bilingual Business Project course, we need to finish a Marketing Project for Wendy’s retargeting Japanese Market, and the client, representative of Wendy’s will also come and evaluate our projects. I think I had a really good start for my new term and new life in Japan, and I hope that I could learn a lot not only in the business field but also in cultural field.

Weekend in Cambodia

This past weekend I traveled to Cambodia and I had an amazing time. I traveled with a group of three other SMU students. We flew in Phnom Penh (capital of Cambodia) on Friday and we left Monday afternoon (taking advantage of my 3-day school schedule!).

On the first day we arrived in Phnom Penh, our flight was delayed so we didn’t arrive in the city until 6pm. As soon as we got there we took a private taxi to go up north to Siem Reap where the great temples of Angkor Wat are. The trip took about 6 hours including a stop for dinner. It was a long ride so by the time we go to Siem Reap, we checked into our guesthouse and just went to sleep.

Riding the tuk-tuk from the airport to the center of the city

The next morning we woke up and set out to explore Angkor Wat. Angkor Wat is a magnificent Hindu/Buddhist temple complex. It’s dedicated as a UNESCCO World Heritage Site to further protect and conserve the ruins. Angkor Wat was built in the 12th century under the Khmer Kingdom. There are many different temples but Angkor Wat is the entrance to the entire park. It was the biggest and grandest temple.

The magnificent Angkor Wat!

We spent two days exploring the temples and there was still more to see! I could of easily spent another day exploring as the temples were so peaceful. Also, since it’s currently low season (rainy season) for traveling in Southeast Asia, there were fewer tourists around which made it even better. Luckily for us, the weather was in our favor; the most it rained was an hour during one day.

A part of Tomb Raiders (featuring Angelina Jolie) was filmed in this temple!

The best part about Angkor Wat was that nothing felt contrived. Although some parts of the temples were obviously restored, nothing about the temples felt perfect which made it even more beautiful. For example, there many statues that had their heads cut off because there was a period when riots happened and people stole Buddha heads to sell off to foreign countries. This didn’t make the temples any less beautiful, it fact it made it even more authentic.

If you look carefully, you’ll noticed that one of the statues in this picture is missing a head…

Although the temples were beautiful, I was more surprised by the poverty I saw in the surrounding area of Angkor Wat, Siem Reap, and villages not too far away from the city. Outside the temples, there were many food and souvenir vendors and every time we got off our tuk-tuk (motorcycle bike with rickshaw attached) to visit a temple, hordes of children would surround us and ask us to buy bracelets and postcards for a 1$. These children were very young too. All of them were barefoot and their clothes looked like they haven’t been washed in months. They were extremely clever as they tried to persuade you to buy their items by saying things like “Buy 1 post card get 9 free!”. Another young girl asked my friend to buy some bracelets for his girlfriend and when he responded that he didn’t have a girlfriend, she said, “You know why? Because you no buy these bracelets!”.

It was sad seeing this because it makes you wonder whether these kids go to school or if they don’t have time because they have to help support their families by selling souvenirs to tourists. After coming back from Cambodia, I researched more about it and found out that despite the tourism that Angkor Wat brings in, 36.6% of the population lives below the poverty line (less than 45 cents per day). Many Cambodian children go to primary school (80%) but less go to lower secondary school (25%) and even less go to upper secondary school (9%).

I witnessed even more poverty when I traveled back to Phnom Penh on Sunday afternoon. We drove pass beautiful green rice paddies and along these rice paddies were houses where the farmers and their families lived. The houses are better described as simple shacks as the whole thing consisted of only one room. Even though we were only driving by, I could tell that there was no kitchen or electricity in the shacks. Bedding was just a blanket on the ground or a hammock outside. Kids ran around barefoot and naked but they all appeared to be very happy and carefree.

I didn’t realize that Cambodia is still so underdeveloped (which sounds very ignorant of me), but I’m glad at least now I’m aware. I wish I could of done more to help but we had such a short amount of time there.

I’ve realized that the most important part about traveling is not seeing new things or famous sights, it’s about learning and letting these experiences shape you.

Beautiful Milan

During my first week in Milan, I traveled out to the center of the city.  When I say the center of the city, it is literally in the center of the city of Milan.  In the center, there is a main cathedral called the Duomo, which is a term used for church, more specifically a catholic church.  The Duomo is literally in the center of Milan.  Then from the Duomo, the city is built as a circle that radiates outward.  The structure of the city can be described as a small circle as its center point, and then a circle of buildings built around the center, and so on and so forth as it keeps radiating out.

The Duomo of Milan. It was absolutely stunning.  Of course this picture does not do it justice.

Above is a picture of the Duomo that I took from behind.  It is absolutely stunning.  The building is so large, with hundreds of handcrafted sculptures of famous disciples, and people described in the Holy Bible.  This church took about 600 years to build, and it is still under reconstruction (if you notice to roof of the building)!  I know from pictures it just looks alright, but it is similar to looking at a picture of the ocean, and actually going to the ocean; two very different experiences.

This is a picture of me about 100 meters from the entrance of Duomo. It is absolutely huge!

I was not allowed to go into the Duomo the day I took the picture above, because I was wearing shorts.  The entrance guards were really strict about what kind of clothing one could wear when entering the cathedral.  It was understandable, because they viewed this as a place to meet God, and they wanted people to wear respectable, very conservative clothing, so I have yet to still go inside, which I am sure is just as beautiful.  This small encounter with the entrance guards was a slight culture shock for me.  At my home church, which is a protestant church, I am allowed to wear whatever I please as long as it was socially appropriate, so shorts and a T-shirt would have been no problem back in many churches in the States, but here at this specific cathedral, they wanted people to dress better when entering a building of God.

Moving on from the Duomo, I was walking around taking pictures of everything around the center plaza and my friend was taking some pictures of me too when a man came from nowhere, just grabbed my hand, and put bird food into my hand (see picture below).

Getting hustled my first day in the center of Milan.

He lifted up my hand and walked away, and right after that, pigeons flew towards me and ate everything in a matter of a few seconds.  First, I hate pigeons…I sometimes see them as rats with wings.  And secondly, once the pigeons (although the picture has just one pigeon, about ten came) landed on my hands, I immediately thought of bird flu.  After that very unenjoyable experience, the man walked back towards me with another friend of his and he pointed to my hand and gestured for money.  He spoke to me in Italian but I understood what he probably said, which was something along the lines of, “You used my bird food and now I want my money from you”.  Him and his friend kept getting closer and kept asking for money so two thoughts flew into my head.  First, for some odd reason, I was quite enjoying this experience.  Maybe because it was the first time I got hustled and I was waiting to see how I would react.  Secondly, I was thinking that they chose the wrong girl, because if they knew anything about my father, they would have known that he has done a good job teaching me not to waste money, and I was sure not going to spend money on these guys. So I told them I did not have money.  They kept following me still so I said in a harsher voice, “I don’t have any money” and walked away (which was quite an obvious lie, since I had a very visible fanni-pack).  They followed me and kept gesturing for a couple minutes but I walked quickly and made sure I was by other people so they eventually gave up.  I know this situation could have been much worse if it was later in the night or if I was alone with not many people around but thankfully that was not the case.  After this experience, I noticed that there were so many people trying to hustle money from tourists or people who looked foreign.  I realized that just because I am Asian, I will probably be targeted more often than other people of Caucasian ethnicities because I will have a harder time “looking” like a typical European.  Also, it won’t help my case that Asians often come with the stereotype that we are all rich, and innocent…especially since I am a short Asian girl.  From this experience I learned to be more aware of my surroundings, to not let strange men give me bird food, and to not wear a fanni-pack around.

Near the central plaza of Duomo, there are hundreds of stores just around the corner selling beauty products, clothing, and accessories.  Milan did live up to its title as the “Fashion Capital of the World”.  There were several malls in which only designer products were sold.  Just below is a picture of a shopping mall that only sold designer products.  There were many expensive cafes next to the shops as well.  Some stores even had their own cafe such as with Gucci, in which they had their own Gucci cafe right outside their store.  The architecture of the mall was beautiful as you can see in the picture below.

This was a designer indoor/outdoor shopping mall right next to Duomo.

Of course I could not afford to buy anything, but I was happy to just walk around and take everything in.  It was a beautiful day, with blue skies, nice friends, and a lot of experiences,   with many more to come!

Academic Life at SMU

Since it’s week 5 already, I feel pretty settled in. The adjustment to SMU was interesting at first but now I think I’ve gotten used to it. There are a lot of small differences between SMU’s Lee Kong Chian School of Business and OSU’s Fisher College of Business.

Overall it’s similar but there are small differences. For one thing, group work is a big deal here. I’m glad that business classes at Fisher required a lot of group work as well because I definitely feel more prepared than my some of my European exchange students (most them were rarely required to do group work for their universities). The group work here is pretty different though, since classes meet for 3 hours at a time instead of breaking it down to smaller chunks of time like 55 minutes, three times a week. Therefore, there is a lot of time for student presentations. Usually the structure will go something like this: the professor lectures the first half of class and then a student group will present the second half of class with material that adds on to the lecture. The students here are very good with PowerPoint and presentation skills as a result.

Another difference between SMU and OSU is the amount of participation that is encouraged here. All of my classes have mandatory participation while I can only think of a handful of classes I’ve taken at OSU that have required that. Every student also has an extravagant name card that they use so that professors will note down their participation. The exchange students really stand out in this case because we all have handwritten name cards on loose-leaf paper. I really do like this part about SMU and I’m hoping some of my classes I take in the future at OSU will be similar.

Classrooms are pretty similar to Fisher’s classrooms!

Since my classes are all 3 hours, I actually only have class from Tuesdays until Thursdays, giving me a weekend of Friday to Monday. This is especially nice for traveling which most exchange students take advantage of. The local students take advantage of this time by having more time to do extra curricular activities (meetings aren’t limited to the week, some are during the weekend) and/or work on group presentations and projects. I’ll post about some of the traveling I will do in a future blog post!

My Arrival Upon Milan

Shortly after I got off my plane, I found myself in Milan, Italy!  It was very exciting to realize that I was actually going to live in Milan for about four months.  I never lived outside of Ohio for very long, especially out of the country, and being in Italy was a good reminder that the world is a very, very big place.

Flying over Europe!

I got out of the airport and found many cabs waiting for me.  I did watch the movie “Taken” right before I came, so I made sure that I did not share my cab with any attractive European men.  Stranger danger I told myself.  Once I hopped in a cab, I gave the driver directions to my dorm, and shortly after we began talking.  He immediately knew I was from America because of my accent, and also because of how little Italian I knew.  I have to admit, it was rather embarrassing not knowing much, if any Italian, because I felt like I supported the stereotype that “Americans don’t care to learn other languages because they think everyone speaks English”.  Of course I don’t think that is true, but I am aware that it is a negative stereotype we bare.  But the driver didn’t seem to care too much, and I had a nice discussion with the cab driver.  He told me about the history of the Italian language, as well as the history of the city and how the city was built.  I was amazed at how much history there was to the Italian culture, and Milan itself.  Comparing the history of Italy which dates back from thousands of years, with America’s recorded history of only two-hundred years is quite a big difference.  Until now, I never really thought about how young United States was.

Next thing I knew, I found myself at Arcobaleno Residence, my dorm.  I was expecting there to be a very quick and organized sign-in system, however, I had to wait in line for about an hour while people ahead of me in line slowly filled out their paperwork.  I compared this with my move in experience at OSU.  At OSU, although there were thousands of new freshmen moving into the dorms, it was a very structured and organized process, that took very little time (in comparison with how many people were moving in).  This is one of many future instances where I realized that in Italy, it sometimes takes a long time to process and file things.  This is something I had to adjust to, because in America, everything seemed to get done much faster.

The Idea of “Kaisu”

Officially, it’s Week 4 of my semester here at Singapore Management University. Only 9 more weeks to go before it finals time! Not that I want the semester to come to end, it’s been amazing living and studying out here.

My new campus!

I’ve been experiencing so many new things here and adjusting to everything at the same time. I find that Singapore is not much of a culture shock for me as I’ve been to Asia before. What I find interesting is however is the myriad of cultures here. Singapore has four national languages- English, Mandarin, Malay, and Tamil. Every day I find myself hearing all four languages. Singapore is still a mystery to me because it’s hard to pinpoint what precisely the Singaporean culture is. It’s a wonderful mix of the West and the East.

Before I got here, I didn’t realize that I would be adjusting to SMU (Singapore Management University) culture in additional the local culture. The culture at my university is a whole new ballpark. I’ve noticed that the academic competition is fiercer here. In fact, it’s straight up cutthroat. There’s a Singlish word here (Singlish is a unique blend of English, Mandarin, Malay, Tamil, and local dialects that is spoken in casual conversation) called Kiasu that means, “fear of losing”. Kiasu is a part of Singaporean culture as people grow up ingrained with the notion that hard work will get you ahead. It also means that Singaporeans are generally very competitive by nature in all aspects of their lives.

The idea of Kiasu became even clearer after my class discussion today. I’m taking a class called “Current Issues in Business, Society, and Government” and today we talked about Singapore’s education system. We watched a movie called, “I Not Stupid” by Jack Neo which is about three boys who are at a disadvantage because they’ve been streamlined into EM3. In the past, Singapore used to streamline students into three academic streams (EM1, EM2, EM3), the best students were placed in EM1 and the students who learned at a lower pace were placed into EM3. Although EM3 was supposed to create a learning environment suitable for students who needed a slower pace, it actually had negative effects for the students because it created a stigma that these students were “stupid”. There was also no possibility that EM3 students would move up the ranks. All of this relied on an examination that students took around age 10. As you can imagine, growing up here is very different than growing up in the US.

One of the best things about studying abroad is the exposure to different societies, cultures, and ideas that I would have not realized if I wasn’t here such as the idea of Kaisu. I’m constantly learning something new each day and I look forward to sharing all of these experiences through this blog!

Going Global with Fisher

Welcome to the Fisher Global Experiences blog. The Office of Global Business (OGB) is a resource to undergraduate and graduate students with the intention of enhancing the educational experience through international experience and exposure. In doing so, students will gain the knowledge and skills eagerly sought after by employers in today’s global marketplace. Students participating in OGB programs will write here about their experiences at Fisher and around the world.

Interested in one of Fisher’s global offerings?

One unique opportunity available to first year FisherDirect students is the Freshman Global Lab. This program enables students to study abroad during their first year at The Ohio State University by traveling to four compelling centers of commerce—the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany.

As Fisher students enter their second year, they gain the opportunity to attend short-term study programs that can also provide academic credit to their major. The Emerging Markets Field Study is one such opportunity that gives students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of business opportunities in developing economies, and prepares them to conduct business in foreign markets.

The Green Business program is another short-term program that provides students the opportunity to examine the initiatives of organizations that have integrated sustainability-focused business practices into their operations. The course looks at the business scene from the perspective of indigenous entrepreneurs, multinational operations, and Costa Rica based companies.

Semester-long Student Exchange is undoubtedly the best immersion experience an undergraduate can have abroad at Ohio State. The Office of Global Business has established the partnership that allows students to learn at top global institutions without paying the extra tuition and earning transferable-credit for their major.

Students can gain global work experience and valuable cultural awareness during Fisher’s Global Summer Internship Programs located in countries that are strategic to international business.  Locations currently include Australia, England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Singapore. The internships are eight weeks in length and are selected specifically chosen to compliment the strengths, abilities, and interests of the Fisher student-intern.

Students who still hope to gain global skills and competencies in a paid internship now have the opportunity to so right here in Ohio through the Export Internship Program (EIP).  EIP features a small, specialized export-focused course during the Spring Semester with a twelve week summer internship placement with a small to medium Ohio business looking to increase their exports.

Graduate students have the option of participating in the new Global Applied Projects Program (GAP). GAP students  gain international experience by working on a business challenge with one of Fisher’s corporate partners.  GAP combines a Spring Semester second session international strategy course and a May term global project with a major client designed to differentiate your work experience.