Financing Education Abroad

Questions on financing education abroad? Katelyn Mistele, who when on the Student Exchange Program to Denmark, has some suggestions for you!

One of the biggest challenges and often times a reason individuals shy away from education abroad is the topic of determining how you will finance your experience. I’m here to tell you that it can be done, and be done economically! It’s important to take into account the following when determining how to finance your study abroad experience: what type of program you are looking for, what locations you are looking at, and how much traveling do you want to do off program.

For starters Fisher offers a variety of programs for education abroad each ranging from a variety of prices. I personally participated in a Fisher Student Exchange Program. The great part about the exchange programs is that they are simply your Ohio State tuition. You don’t have to pay more or less you simply pay your Ohio State tuition as you normally would and essentially you “swap places” with a student from the university you will be attending. There are other programs as well that have different financing plans, but these can be affordable as well! There are many opportunities through scholarships and even using STEP money if you happen to be involved in that program. Fisher’s Office of Global Business has a scholarship program that I know myself and many other students who were studying abroad were lucky enough to receive. I personally only applied for one scholarship the Fisher’s Office of Global Business FCOB Global Experience Scholarship. It was a super easy process and didn’t even require that much time. I just had to fill out a brief questionnaire! It’s all about keeping an eye on those opportunities early, and simply applying! Fisher does a great job at outlining those opportunities and making it easy for you to take advantage of them.

Another important factor to take into consideration is where you want to go abroad. This is something that I didn’t take into consideration and it was quite the shock for me. I studied abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark which I didn’t know but is one of the more expensive cities in Europe. It’s important to consider this and plan accordingly. I didn’t plan out a budget prior to leaving but I definitely should have. I had to be frugal when I was in Denmark. I didn’t eat out as much as I would to have liked because I had to prioritize my finances and I wanted to travel, as opposed to experience all of the restaurant’s the city had to offer.

Finally, the most important thing you need to plan for financially is how much traveling you want to do during your program. Personally, this was a key point for me. I really wanted to travel all around Europe and I did! I ended up going to 19 countries when I was out there, but it definitely required a lot of financial planning. I worked the summer and semester leading up to my exchange to save for this purpose. Besides saving I would suggest to prioritize. Like I mentioned before eating out in Copenhagen is very expensive meals ranging from $25-45. So instead of eating out multiple times a week I would opt to cook and use that money to travel instead.

Just to break down an average trip for you I have some costs listed below that were associated with each trip. This of course varied from trip to trip as some cities are more expensive than others, and some places are more expensive to fly into, but this will give you a general idea for when you are planning out your finances.

  • Plane Ticket = $100-200
  • Airbnb or Hostel = $50
  • Food = $100
  • Activities = $50
  • Transportation = $30
  • Souvenirs = $10
  • Other = $50
  • Total = $390-490

Overall, education abroad can be financially challenging, but totally do able! I would suggest that no one not study abroad because they are worried they can’t afford it because the experience is so valuable and amazing. All you need to do is plan carefully and prioritize and you can have a semester full of traveling and experiences that can’t even have a price tag. Also again apply, apply for scholarships they are there and you never know unless you simply apply!

Tips Before Arriving in Strasbourg

Ling Shao shares her tips and advise on pre-departure preparations for studying abroad on the Student Exchange Program to France. Covering topic on accommodation search, to visa process, to traveling!

This is not my first-time studying abroad but the only difference is that I am doing this independently this time. I used to go abroad with a friend and or have somebody picking me up at the destination, so I had concern and had to plan for all the circumstances that I might confront ahead of time. I have had two biggest challenges:

Finding Accommodations

Preparing the accommodation is very complex. Luckily, I was able to find my accommodation through the website my host institution gave me. For France, there are several websites that you can use: leboncoin / housing anywhere / airbnb. If you really cannot find a place before you arrive, an option may be to find a cheap hostel and try to communicate with your host institution. Strasbourg is a really safe place comparing to other places in Europe, but still be careful of the location of the hostels, and definitely do some researches on the destination that you are going to!

Visa Process

My visa process was really challenging and tough. I am an international student and I had to transfer my academic status from the US to my home country to get a French Student Visa. However, after all of the challenges that I dealt through this application, I now feel confident that I am able to deal with any visa application in the future. Just to start early and do not hesitate to ask questions to the embassy in your country.

Traveling 

I googled and searched a lot of tips about traveling to Europe (useful website can be TripAdvisor and youtube videos, and there is a channel that I really love named “DamonandJo”), but the one I stress is: PACK LESS! You can buy everything you need in Europe, especially in Strasbourg.

Safety

BE SMART! Just be aware of your surrounding and avoid going to higher risk places in the cities you visit. Ask! Most people in Europe can speak English, even if you cannot communicate with them in the local language.

Using Study Abroad to Explore Your Passions

Emma Goilo shared her passion of travel, which motivated her to go abroad on the Student Exchange Program to Trinity College, Ireland. What she gained was an expansion of knowledge on different countries and many skills and qualities that developed her further personally.

My passion is traveling, I love to visit new countries and learn about the culture, the language and most importantly the people that live there. I have traveled to 35 countries and I am just getting started. I was fortunate growing up to have parents that valued travel, that made sacrifices to ensure my brothers and I saw the world and always supported what we wanted to do—whether that be volunteering in Colombia for a few months, dropping everything to travel or studying abroad. Having parents that support my passions has empower me to seek more opportunities.

Acropolis
Sahara Desert – Morocco

The ability to travel was the main reason I chose to participate on the Student Exchange Program at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland – a main hub for Ryanair. While abroad I made it a goal to travel to places I had never been before. I went to Scotland, Estonia, Latvia, Finland, Greece and Morocco, as well as some places I had been before. I learned the history of the places I went and definitely enjoyed the food. I think I grew a lot the past semester as a result of my travels. I went to places where  most people don’t think to travel and to places that pushed me as far outside of my comfort zone as I had ever been—which is where growth happens. An example of how I grew during my travels was in my thoughts for others. When traveling with others, I had to learn to make decisions and choices that benefited the group and that addressed the desires of the group and not just myself. The study abroad opportunity that Fisher provided for me, and even supported, allowed me to live my passion and for that I will always be grateful. And the best part about studying abroad is now I have friends from all over the world to visit!!! My passion for traveling was only quenched for the moment, I will always be planning my next trip.

To summarize, here is a list of some of the skills I learned abroad:

  • independence
  • adaptation
  • cultural intelligence
  • collaborating with individuals from high and low context countries
  • self awareness

I think it is really important that students have goals for their abroad experience – personal goals, experiential goals, and academic goals. But I think it is just as important that students be open to change and experiences they couldn’t have imagined. The best thing about studying abroad are the things you don’t expect, the friends you don’t know you are going to meet. My biggest piece of advice for students preparing to go abroad is balance. Have goals, but don’t let them put you in a box. Be prepared but don’t become paralyzed by the unexpected.

How Traveling Develops Better Leadership

On the Student Exchange Program at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, Emma Goilo describes how she developed her leadership skills and global citizen mindset abroad.

Since I was little, I dreamed of living abroad. I wanted to live in a glamorous and architectural city, with rich history. And last semester I achieved that dream. I spent four months living in Dublin, Ireland and attending Trinity College. I studied, made life-long friends from around the globe and got to travel. What I didn’t realize about education abroad is how much I grew, the challenging academic environment and diverse social situations made me a better leader. I came back from Dublin more self-aware, a truly global citizen and with the ability to work with and empower diverse groups of people – all factors I consider vital in leadership. I went abroad to travel, to study and to make friends but came back to the USA a more developed leader.

I believe that to be a true leader one must be self-aware, have the ability to empower others and be a global citizen. Being self-aware means to know not just your strengths but your weaknesses. I believe that addressing weaknesses and compensating for them is even more important than flexing your strengths. The biggest strength that I encountered within myself is adaptability. I was able to quickly adapt to my environment: a new country, a new university, and a new group of friends. This adaptability will serve me well in my career, I will be able to quickly adapt to new work teams and to new work locations. I think I was adaptable prior to my semester abroad but this exchange experience gave me a chance to practice and further develop that strength. One weakness I encountered while abroad is that I require structure and at Trinity College there was a lack of structure I am used to in the USA. Classes don’t have weekly assignment, exams or even structured class. I quickly learned that I had to adopt the classes to my strength. I had to make small weekly assignments for myself or come exam time I would flounder. This experience made me realize that I must adjust situations to play to my strengths, rather than to my weaknesses. Another key component of leadership is having the ability to empower others. While abroad I was able to empower my friends to face their fears and to speak up to things they didn’t agree with. I believe that being a true leader isn’t about making yourself look good but making whatever team you work on look good as a whole. Finally, being a leader means being a global citizen.

This doesn’t mean that you have to travel to be the most traveled, it means that you have an appreciation for cultures different than your own and you value the perspectives that come along with those diverse cultures. I believe those are some of the key components to successful leadership and that my time abroad pushed me to work on being self-aware, on empowering others and on being a global citizen.

Coming Back from Australia

Maggie Hobson counts the many blessing from the semester abroad as she returns to the U.S. from Australia, after completing her semester at Curtin University on the Student Exchange Program.

My last day in Australia:

8-10am: Enjoyed my final $10 black coffee and raspberry muffin at my favorite on-campus cafe as I did some last minute studying

10-11:10am: Psychology exam

11:10am-2pm: Made my last meal of pasta using the one pan, one bowl and one fork that I bought for the entire semester and ate it while doing more last minute studying

2-4:10pm: Human Structure and Function exam

4:10-6pm: Packed my things, cleaned my room and had it inspected by the RA

6-9:30pm: Said my goodbyes with the amazing friends I made during the semester over one final group dinner

A few of my friends outside the car, saying goodbye

9:30-11:55pm: Went to the airport and checked in

From that time on, I traveled 32 hours to be greeted by my parents in the Chicago airport where my audit internship with EY started the next morning.

My parents greeting me at the airport with a sign

To some, this may seem like a “day” (it was only a day since I gained 12 hours) they would dread, but to me this is a day to be so thankful for.  First of all, I had the opportunity to study in Australia and take classes a regular accounting major at OSU would not normally take.  Not to mention, my professors were able to move my exams early so that I could get back to Chicago in time for my internship.  Secondly, I made amazing friendships and lasting memories that I will never forget.  Thirdly, I was greeted by two very supportive parents who were able to meet me away from home (Ohio) in order to move my things into an apartment in Chicago for the summer.  Lastly, I am humbled to start an internship with EY where I am able to gain experience working for a big four accounting firm.

OSU has provided me with so many great opportunities and for that I am forever thankful.  Studying abroad in Australia has been hands down my favorite college experience and I would do nothing to change my experience there.  I am satisfied with the time I spent there: the places I was able to explore, the people I met and the things I was able to accomplish.  Now, I am looking forward to continuing my internship with EY.  My fellow interns have already been so enthralled by the fact that I was living in Australia for five months.  I plan to share my experiences in a beneficial way.  The knowledge I learned about different cultures through becoming friends with so many exchange students from all around the world, will only benefit me in the workplace.  Therefore, overall I am thankful for this experience because it did not only influence me personally, but professionally as well.

 

It’s a Small World After All

Calling out O-H! and getting an I-O! back in the Glass Mountains in Australia while on a hike, along with may other encounters, Maggie Hobson studying at Curtin University realizes how small the world can be and how anywhere can feel like home.

It’s crazy how small the world can be.  Especially when you are traveling with an open mind and meeting as many people as possible.  This past week and a half I traveled with four other exchange students to the East Coast of Australia during our time off from Curtin University.  On the first plane ride from Perth to Cairns, I sat next to a girl that looked about the same age as me and we got talking.  It turns out she attends University of Guelph in Canada, the same university that the two guys who were on my trip attend.  What a small world.  We ended up spending some time with her in Cairns, exploring the Great Barrier Reef and  the Daintree Rainforest.  After those few days in Cairns, we departed ways with our new friend and flew to Brisbane.

Selfie with a turtle in the Great Barrier Reef

While in Brisbane, we were able to explore the city as well as nearby areas such as Noosa, Byron Bay and the Gold Coast.  While on a hike through the Glass Mountains, we passed by a group of people headed down the trail.  I took a double take and saw a woman wearing an Ohio State t-shirt. “OH” I shouted and of course she replied with an “IO” and a big grin.  Even though that was such a short moment, there was a part of me that felt like I was back at home.

Nick, Steffi and I in the Glade Mountains, right outside of Brisbane

After a bit of a drive, we made it to Sydney.  We were able to meet so many people who had been traveling around the world for months, sharing stories of their adventures.  I found it amazing how so many people travel to places alone and just meet people as they go.  All the travelers we met had such open mindsets, making them people we wanted to spend time with.  So we spent a lot of time with them and one day while hiking along the coast from Coogee Beach to Bondi Beach, an older gentleman stopped my friend from New York because of her shirt.  Turns out he had attended the same university as her, New Paltz.  We learned from him that he has lived in Sydney for quite a few years now, but was a born and raised New Yorker.  What a small world.

Views on the hike from Coogee Beach to Bondi Beach in Sydney

Finally, towards the end of our trip, we flew to Melbourne.  It happened to be Kings Day, which is a Dutch holiday and the last girl traveling in my group was Dutch.  That evening, after exploring the city, we attended a Dutch festival to celebrate the holiday that was so important to her and her culture.  I spent my night trying all kinds of Dutch food and meeting spirited people who were happy to talk about their Dutch traditions.

My friend Steffi enjoying food in China Town in Melbourne before heading to the Dutch festival

By the end of our week an a half trip on the East Coast of Australia, myself (from Ohio), my friends Mitch and Nick (both from Toronto), my friend Paige (from New York) and my friend Steffi (from Amsterdam) were all able to experience something from each of our home towns.  In my time exploring the world and seeing so many new things, I was baffled by how small the world can really be.

Learning Cultural Intelligence (CQ) – Core vs. Flex

“‘Everyone assumes that Cultural Intelligence (CQ) comes from understanding other people’s cultures, but you really have to understand your own’ (Middleton). Julia is so right about this point.” says Sydney Lapin studying abroad on the Student Exchange Program at Ecole de Management Strasbourg in Strasbourg, France. Read more on what she learned about CQ and how it related to her experience abroad, as well as how being abroad has helped her learn about her own culture and about herself.

Friends from all over Europe getting together for Valentine’s Day

The other day in my International Marketing Strategy class, we watched a Ted Talk that really spoke out to me. It was called “Cultural Intelligence: The Competitive Edge for Leaders” spoken by Julia Middleton. In the beginning, Julia defines cultural intelligence as “the ability to cross borders and boundaries between different cultures,  and actually thrive in doing so and love doing it and never want to not do it”. Julia grew up in the time where IQ meant everything, where it was considered crucial. Then, EQ (Emotional Intelligence) came around and people realized that it would be good for leaders to have this trait as well. However, people who are “good with people”, may really just be good with people who are like them. That is where CQ (Cultural Intelligence) comes into play: “the ability to work with people, and lead people, who are not like you”.

Julia went around the world, studying and interviewing people who she thought to have a good amount of cultural intelligence. Through her conversations, she found one large thing in common: “They had sort of figured out which bits of them was core, and which bits of them was flex”. By core “bits”, Julia means the behaviors, values and beliefs that are absolutely crucial to you being who you are, and a part of you that you are not willing to change. By flex bits, Julia means everything else that you are willing to compromise, or be flexible about. She states, “The more core you are, the more people trust you. The more flex you are, the more people trust you”. By this I believe she means that one needs to find a good balance, and that balance is what people who obtain cultural intelligence have found. For example, a salesperson is extremely flexible, and you lose all parts of your core and no one trusts you. And then, as Julia mentions, you have people like your grandparents, who are so set in their core that they refuse to be the least bit flexible.

Julia stated that cultural intelligence is found on the line between one’s core and one’s flex, and it moves from learning new things, gaining new experiences, and meeting new people. This video really got me thinking about which parts of me are core, and which parts are flex. I thought about my life, and my culture, and I tried and am still trying to figure it out. I think it will take a long time, if not forever, for someone to truly figure out where they stand because like Julia says, the line is always moving based on the things you learn and the people you meet.

Being abroad, I completely see how this video connects with my life. I have met people from all over the world, and not only met them but have held conversations, been involved in group projects, and traveled with these people of different backgrounds. There are parts of me I have and still need to adapt in order to get things to go smoothly when I work with people from other cultures.

With that, I am talking about the part of the video where Julia mentions knots in the core. We all have knots: parts of our supposed core that are based on PRE-judgement, rather than judgement. These are things we should push at and work on changing about ourselves. They might not be pretty, but I feel like that’s the point. For example, something I know I need to work on is my emotional resilience. When coming abroad, I thought that I had a pretty good grip on the things that would be difficult: the language barrier, the bureaucracy, the new school system. However, I did not think about preparing myself for how to react when difficult things are occurring. This is emotional resilience, the ability to bounce back and be okay when something is extremely frustrating and difficult. I have bounced back, but there are situations that I know I could have been more flexible and less reactive about.

An important part of the Ted Talk was where CQ comes from: “Everyone assumes that CQ comes from understanding other people’s cultures, but you really have to understand your own” (Middleton). Julia is so right about this point. She talks about the need to understand how your culture helps you versus hinders you, how it could open doors or close them, when your culture causes other people problems, and when your culture causes you to miss opportunities. To quote myself from my application, I thought one of the most important things was for me to “experience new cultures, learn about different backgrounds, and immerse myself in these cultures”. However, I now realize that the most important thing I am doing here, aside from learning about other cultures (which of course is still important), is learning who I am and how my culture, my core and my flex, affect my life and the people around me.

It is actually extremely complex, because when I think about the many things that I thought I was flexible on, it turns out that in some situations here I have found these things as “knots” in my core: they are things I want and aim to be flexible about, but I am currently not there yet, like my emotional resilience for example. It also turns out that when thinking deeper, things that I thought were in my core are actually things that I am quite flexible on. The biggest example of that I can think of is my Judaism. Being Jewish has always been one of the most important parts of me. I grew up in Cleveland, in an amazing Jewish community, that gave me so many opportunities I am grateful for. While being Jewish is something I hold very close, this video has made me think about the fact that yes, I am Jewish. Yes, this is important to me, and a part of me that I will not change. But, Judaism is actually one of the most flexible religions in the world. For instance, I personally do not think I believe in God, or in a lot of the things that supposedly happened back then, but Judaism still accepts me as a Jew. I am flexible to new opinions that go along with Judaism, and my thoughts and beliefs about it are always changing. So while being Jewish is something in my core, something that makes me who I am, I am still quite flexible about my beliefs through my religion.

I am beyond grateful to have seen this video while being abroad, and to be able to relate it to my everyday life here in Strasbourg, France. I feel as though I am much more aware of my personal strengths and weaknesses, and what I need to work on in order to become more culturally aware and to gain cultural intelligence. I know that the journey to having cultural intelligence is not easy, and will take a long time, but I think it is so important to be open to changing things about yourself, while also realizing what you are not willing to change in order to be who you are.

A trip to the Black Forest in Germany

Singapore Management University: Singapore’s Urban Business School

Megan Reardon introduces Singapore Management University (SMU), the university that she studied at for a semester on the Student Exchange Program. Hear about the classes she took, the faculty, the facilities, and all other things about SMU!

Attending Singapore Management University (SMU) was instrumental in shaping my experiences while abroad. SMU is an urban, multi-cultural learning hub designed to integrate the bustle of business with the drive for learning in Singapore. Unlike the two other universities in Singapore, SMU is incredibly urban. It is within walking distance of the city center, and offers the most activities compared to the other two school – Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and National University of Singapore (NUS). SMU has five different schools (similar to how OSU has Fisher, the College of Arts and Sciences, etc.), all of which offer classes you can take as an exchange student. Compared to Ohio State, SMU was very small. Only about 8,000 students attend SMU, compared to OSU’s nearly 60,000. Being in the middle of the city, it didn’t feel that small, but it was still a stark contrast to OSU. The typical class size at SMU was 30-40 students. This includes the “intro” courses, which at OSU consist of hundreds of students in one lecture.

Courses at SMU are designed as modules, with one module consisting of roughly 3 OSU credit hours. While abroad, I took four courses: International Finance, Sociology of Terrorism, Introduction to Marketing, and Cultural Policy and Practice. My personal favorite was Sociology of Terrorism because it offered a unique perspective on terrorism versus the views I was used to seeing in the U.S. International Finance was incredibly difficult as an exchange student whose classes aren’t Pass/Fail. Though I passed this course, I chose to retake it at OSU to get a higher grade. Introduction to Marketing was similar to what I would expect an OSU class to be like. Cultural Policy and Practice was outside of my comfort zone as it was an intense dive into arts policy, but taught me the most about Singapore’s culture. Like at OSU, many of the professors had PhD’s or had strong institutional knowledge of their specialization. For example, my International Finance professors had both PhD’s and entrepreneurs who worked across international borders.

Classes at SMU had different formats than at Ohio State. I had one class on Tuesday, one on Wednesday, and two classes on Thursday. Each class was 3.5 hours with a 15-minute break in the middle of class. Classes rarely, if ever, were let out early. If I wasn’t traveling on Monday or Friday, I would spend those days catching up on homework or studying for exams in the library. Typically, a course was structured so that a group project was the main focus of the class. There was also a final for each course I was in, but placed at the same time as the group project was due, so prior planning was essential. I tried to allocate all of the time on my weekends to exploring Singapore or other countries in Southeast Asia.

If you look closely, you can see me!
The newly renovated quad at SMU

Why You Should Create a Study Abroad Blog

“I am going to tell you why I chose to blog and why you should too.” says Samantha Ludes, as she studies at Universidad Pontificia Comillas in Madrid, Spain for a semester on the Student Exchange Program. How will you document your time abroad?

There are endless ways to document your time abroad but it ultimately comes down to what works best for you. Is it keeping a written journal? Or an Instagram account? Or a combination of the two? Upon my arrival in Spain I had decided that I was going to have an Instagram account where I posted photos from my travels. What I didn’t like about this route was that I found myself not including details about the places I went and primarily just sharing pictures. I decided that this was not the best option for me, so I moved to journaling. The issue with journaling is the lack of convenience as well as the inability to share photos. This was when I decided I would try out a blog.

The benefit of blogging is that you can do it anywhere you have access to technology, I often write posts on my phone and then use my computer to add photos and tag restaurants. There are also many sites that offer free blogs but I found that I liked WordPress the most. The themes are endless and you can personalize it to your liking. I spent a bit of time playing around with my site until I settled on a theme I loved. Now I write a post on every trip, my favorite places to shop, and whatever else that comes to mind. If you don’t want people to see your posts you can password protect them.

WordPress can seem a bit overwhelming at first but you can Google just about any question and there should be an answer. Whenever I go on a trip I make sure to start a post with the date and place so that it serves as a reminder to work on it. After a weekend trip I go through my photos and put them in an album under the location so that when I am working on my blog I can Airdrop all of the photos to my computer with ease. WordPress has a really great app that is super simple to use and if you want to write down notes during your trip, this is a great place to store them. Also, if you don’t feel comfortable with everyone viewing your posts, then you can password protect them.

At the end of the day, find some way to capture your memories and experiences, you will thank yourself later. Don’t worry about grammar rules, just write your posts how you would share your stories. My blog is primarily for myself and my family but when I share it on Instagram or Facebook I can see that over 200 people have visited my site that day. The one thing people always say to me after they read my blog is that they read it in my voice, which sounds funny but that is ultimately my goal; to share my stories as if I am sitting across from you in person.

I chose the name “No Pasa Nada” for my blog because it best represents my time here in Spain. “No pasa nada” means “don’t worry about it” in English and to me, this embodies the relaxed Spanish culture.  People here take longer lunch breaks, grab coffee with friends, and always stop to say hello. They don’t worry about rushing places and go about life with less urgency, something I have worked on adopting. I decided that I am going to continue my blog (as well as the “no pasa nada” lifestyle) when I go back to the states. I have found that I enjoy keeping my memories in one place and I can’t wait to look back and see everything I have done and all the people I have met.

Building Your Global Career

Having aspiration of working abroad one day, Katelyn Mistele attends a professional speaker event at Copenhagen Business School (Denmark) about setting yourself up for a global career. She learns about the pros and cons of having a globally mobile career, and shares her insights on her experience studying abroad and what she gained from being abroad.

Copenhagen Business School is like Fisher in the fact that many companies and speakers frequently visit the school to give talks and recruit. There was an individual who is currently work with Maersk, the largest shipping company in the world, but also worked with P&G with Gillette, who put on a presentation one day. I decided to attend as the message of the talk was marketing yourself and setting yourself up for a global career. 

The individual who was giving the talk has led a successful and extensive global career. He is from London but after working with P&G for a few years in London he made a jump to Switzerland. From that he changed companies and spent the next decade jumping between Singapore and London with Maersk. Today he sits in Denmark still working with Maersk and his career is still mobile and he will most likely make another career move soon. This background was so interesting to me because I have always heard about individuals being globally mobile with their career but this isn’t as common in the United States. Instead, we see intercontinental movement with jobs. The speaker proposed that the major contributing factor to his ability to be mobile in Europe is the European Union and how it is easier to be mobile for work here than it is across boarders in other parts of the world. 

He asked us to brain storm a list of questions regarding what we would ask if we were asked by a company to confirm that we are globally mobile. As a class we came up with questions regarding the length of the assignment, the preparation in cultural terms before the project, questions regarding the location itself, and the opportunities for development during the assignment and after the assignment. There are a lot of deciding factors that go into deciding if an individual wants a global career and its important to keep in mind aspects regarding preparation and development. In terms of preparation the speaker told us that small moves as opposed to big ones have more problems. For example a jump from England to France is harder to adjust to than a jump from England to Singapore. Another key factor to take into consideration is the development opportunities during the assignment and after the assignment. A lot of times with expatriation assignments there is high failure rates upon arrival back to ones home country as readjusting seems to be harder. The speaker told us that during his return from one of his projects his mentor told him to not talk about his experiences that much because people back at home really don’t care that much. He said it was so hard to keep his thoughts and experiences completely to himself but he said in the long run it was worth it and helped him to get back into to the English culture faster. 

This presentation was very interesting for me as working abroad or on abroad accounts is something I am definitely interested in looking into in the future. At a first glance I, as I am sure most other people would be, just think about the location. We all want to travel and work somewhere cool, but there are many important factors that contribute to what would make this a successful assignment and contribute to a successful global career. The speaker also suggested that if we have any inkling to go and lead a global career that we should. He said that the 70-20-10 model can be applied to working on international assignments as 70% of your learning in your career happens on the job and the best way to learn and grow in an international environment is to just take the job. The 20% is learning what happens with peers or mentors and the 10% is “classroom learning” which can happen in the class room or even on the internet in the form of training videos. All parts of this model apply to any assignment but the speaker was trying to point out that you learn the most from being on the job so if you want to grow your career internationally it makes the most sense to take international opportunities as they arise because that’s when you’ll learn and grow the most. 

He also mentioned how the environment of global employment is changing. There are now an increase in short term assignments which last less than two years and this is a positive as it is making people more mobile. However, there is a downside as customers do not like when people continuously rotate as it is harder to build long term relationships. Also companies are starting to now really look at the cost of expatriation as it is very expensive. So the question that is facing employees and businesses today is what is the balance? 

Personally, I hope that at some point in my career I have the opportunity to go on an expatriation assignment. After spending some time in Denmark, I have grown so much culturally and learned a lot. Only these international experiences can provide you with this personal growth. It is one thing to just read about a culture and learn about its nuances but you really do not reap all the benefits of cultural exposure and integration unless you go and live in the culture. I personally have become not only more mindful of my nature, but also have picked up some of the Danish cultural traits. For example, Jantelov is an integral part of Danish culture. At its core, Jantelov is the idea that everyone is equal and on the same level and the Danish peoples actions should be in accordance with this idea. It goes further to describe how if one fall the society will catch them and help them back up. After being here and living in this culture I definitely can see aspects of this part of their culture and I am hoping that I will be able to assimilate parts of it into my everyday life and bring this part of Danish culture with me back to my life in the United States. 

I strongly believe that cultural integration and sharing is something that I think will not only benefit myself and my career but could benefit a lot of individuals. As the speaker suggested 70% of learning happens on the job, and I think this can extend to study abroad or any cultural experience. It is important for myself to take advantage of these opportunities, and I hope that someday I will have the chance to go on an international assignment and further learn and mold my own cultural identity.